Apollo 11 Multimedia

Apollo 11 Image Library

Figure Captions Copyright © 1995-2009 by Eric M. Jones and Ken Glover.
All rights reserved.
HTML Design by Brian W. Lawrence.
Last revised 28 July 2014.

No copyright is asserted for NASA photographs. If a recognizable person appears in a photo, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. Photos may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA or by any NASA employee of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if a NASA photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.

NASA photos reproduced from this archive should include photo credit to "NASA" or "National Aeronautics and Space Administration" and should include scanning credit to the appropriate individuals or agencies as noted in the captions.

Many of the scans of photos taken during the missions were done from the original film. These scans are being done by NASA Johnson, with some post-processing by Kipp Teague. The film is scanned at 4096 x 4096 pixels per image. Kipp reduced each digital image to approximately 2350 x 2350 pixels (equivalent to 300 dpi) and did minor adjustments of levels to ensure that (1) brightly lit areas of lunar soil were neutral grey, (2) objects with known colors (such as the CDR stripes or the LCRU blankets) looked right, and (3) information in bright or dark areas was not lost. These images from original film are indicated by the notation 'OF300' in the image description. In each case, a 900 x 900 pixel version is also provided.


Anaglyphs in the image libraries created from sequential panorama frames by the ALSJ editor exist only because of Yuri Krasilnikov's willingness to teach me the art. Whatever value the anaglyphs have is due to Yuri's insights and guidance. Flaws are my doing. Briefly, panorama stitching freeware Hugin is used to create both non-stereo pan assemblies and remapped versions of the images. The latter are then made into anaglyphs using GIMP. The individual remapped images are linked from the corresponding Library entries for the original frames. The remapped images can be used to create stereo views using other methods.


For those interested in the subject of Apollo Photography and the Color of the Moon, see a brief discussion written for the ALSJ by Michael Light.


This Apollo 11 Image Library contains all of the pictures taken on the lunar surface by the astronauts together with pictures from pre-flight training and pictures of equipment and the flight hardware. High-resolution version of all the lunar surface images are included. A source for both thumbnail and low -resolution versions of the lunar surface images is a website compiled by Paul Spudis and colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston.


Descriptions of the cameras, film and general contents of the various magazines used during Apollo 11 can be found in National Space Science Data Center Report NSSDC 70-06, Apollo 11 Lunar Photography, issued April 1970.


Journal Contributor Paul White has made detailed comparisons of cloud patterns seen in a large number of Apollo images with imagery taken at close to the same time by various meteorlogical satellites.


Sections:


Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera Images

Original LROC image courtesy NASA/GSFC/ASU. Deconvovled/enhanced versions courtesy NASA/GSFC/ASU/GoneToPlaid.



LROC Images of Tranquility Base in order of Solar Phase from Sunrise to Sunset

Date and Time (UTC)
LROC Image
Solar El / Az
LRO Altitude
(km)

Horiz/Vert Res.
(m/px)

Lighting
Features
22 Dec 2009 22:43:38 M116161085R 8.2/90.7 47
0.48/0.55
Early Morn.

18 Jun 2010 10:00:42 M131494509L 10.8/89.7 40
0.40/0.55
Early Morn.

25 Nov 2009 14:44:11 M113799518R 35.8/92.0 47
0.51/0.54
Mid. Morn.
Faint track definition
22 May 2010 02:06:13 M129133239R 36.9/89.2 41
0.41/0.55
Mid. Morn.

29 Oct 2009 08:14:07 M111443315R
63.8/94.9
49
0.49/0.54
Late Morn.
Excellent track definition
01 Oct 2009 23:50:40 M109080308R 87.8/195.3
50
0.53/0.54
Noon
Good track definition
04 Sep 2009 16:18:27
M106719774L 62.7/266.3
122
1.28/1.26
Early Aft.
Better track definition than in August '09 but not as good as 1 October '09
01 Mar 2010 03:50:15 M122054682R 62.3/271.3 42
0.43/0.55
Early Aft.

08 Aug 2009 09:15:31
M104362199R 36.1/269.0
115
1.17/1.19
Mid. Aft.
Armstrong track to Little West faintly visible, LRRR, PSEP
01 Feb 2010 First Pass 19:52:11 M119693197L 34.9/270.3 41
0.46/0.88
Mid. Aft.

01 Feb 2010 Next Orbit 21:45:17 M119699983R 34.0/270.3 41
0.46/0.9
Mid. Aft.

29 Jul 2010 First Pass 08:53:03 M135032851L 28.9/268.8 46
0.53/0.55
Mid. Aft.

29 Jul 2010 Next Orbit 10:46:23 M135039651L 27.9/268.9 46
0.49/0.55
Mid. Aft.

12 Jul 2009 First Pass 01:08:01 M102000149R 10.2/270.2 113 1.18/1.18 Late Aft. LRRR, PSEP
12 Jul 2009 Next Orbit 05:06:36
M102014464R 8.2/270.2
113
1.29/1.17
Late Aft.
LRRR, PSEP not visible
05 Jan 2010 13:46:07 M117338434R 6.4/269.8 41 0.42/0.55
Late Aft.

02 Jul 2010 02:52:17 M132678405R 2.0/270.0 46
0.46/0.55
Sunset



Apollo 11 Site - Sunrise to Sunset WMV Film ( 36 Mb )

ALSJ Contributor GoneToPlaid has used eleven LROC images taken of the Apollo 11 landing site between 12 July 2009 and and 22 May 2010 to show how the appearance of the site from overhead changes with sun angle. Each frame has been converted to a common scale and has been deconvolved and enhanced. The WMV film begins with a presentation of the frames in the order which they were taken. The next section presents the frames in order of solar elevation, beginning with local sunrise and ending with sunset. The third sequence is ordered by solar elevation and shows as area of about 600 x 360 meters, centered on the LM. The sequence shows changes in the appearance of the LM, terrain features, astronaut tracks, rocks, and deployed equipment under different lighting conditions. The sequence also shows bright objects well away from the LM which, because each persists over two or more consecutive images, are almost certainly pieces of Mylar blown off the descent stage during LM liftoff. The final sequence, GoneToPlaid writes, "is a repeat of the previous sequence, but with only a one-sixth-second delay before transitioning to the next image. This helps the sequence flow smoothly from start to finish. It also provides a stronger visual effect where the viewer can clearly see the top of the LM descent stage shifting left and right, relative to the footpads, due to the changing perspective from which the LRO viewed the AP11 landing site."
12 July 2009 First Pass 01:08:01 UTC; Solar El/Az 10.2/270.2; LRO Altitude 113 km.  (2.8 Mb)
A detail enlarged by a factor of three shows the LRRR and PSEP as bright spots roughly 21 and 27 meters, respectively, south of the LM. At higher sun angles, an LRRR cover is visible about 3.5 meters east of the LRRR location. The raw LROC file is M102000149R. The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 0.47N/24.21E.

Deconvolved, 0.50 m/pixel (4.7 Mb TIF) and 1.0 m/pixel (4.9 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

12 July 2009 Next Orbit 05:06:36 UTC; Solar El/Az 8.2/270.2; LRO Altitude 113 km.  (0.6 Mb)
The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 0.53N/22.22E. The longitude difference produced noticable east-west foreshortening. In a 3x-enlarged detail, neither the LRRR, LRRR cover, nor the PSEP are immediately obvious. Labeled versions and a link to the raw file (nacr00000ada) are available at the LROC website. The raw LROC file is M102014464R.

Deconvolved, 0.50 m/pixel (4.8 Mb TIF) and 1.0 m/pixel (5.3 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

08 August 2009 9:15:31 UTC; Solar El/Az 36.1/269.0; LRO altitude 115 km.  (0.8 Mb)
This is our first look at Neil's path to Little West Crater, starting from close to LRRR where he retrieved the ALSCC (Close-up Camera) from a rock where he had set it down. A 3x-enlarged detail shows the LM, LRRR, PSEP. Labeled versions and a link to the raw file (M104362199R) are available at the LROC website. The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 0.83N/23.93E.

On 14 January 2009, five months before LRO was launched, Journal Contributor Scott Cruickshank made use of AS11-40-5961, the last of Neil's photos taken from the rim of Little West Crater, and AS11-40-5962, which he took on the way back to the LM, to correct errors in existing maps of the routes Neil took to and from Little West. Cruickshank's result is very similar to the routes revealed by LROC images.

Deconvolved, 0.50 m/pixel (4.0 Mb TIF) and 1.0 m/pixel (4.0 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

04 September 2009 16:18:27 UTC; Solar El/Az 62.7/266.3; LRO altitude 122.49 km. (0.5 Mb)
Higher solar elevation than the 08 August image. Good track definition to Little West. Just a hint of the LRRR and PSEP visible in the 0.5 m/pixel deconvolved version. The raw file is M106719774L. The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 0.95N/24.33E.

Deconvolved, 0.50 m/pixel (4.2 Mb TIF) and 1.0 m/pixel (3.5 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

01 October 2009 23:50:40 UTC; Solar El/Az 87.8/195.3; LRO altitude 50 km. (1.8 Mb)
A 3x-enlarged detail shows the EASEP components, with the LRRR cover quite bright with the Sun near the zenith. The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 0.62N/23.92E. What may be a piece of mylar blown off the descent stage during ascent stage liftoff is also labelled. The LRRR cover can be seen in its final position in a detail ( 0.2 Mb ) from AS11-37-5548, one of the pictures Neil took out his window after the EVA. A labelled drawing of the PSEP includes dimenions provided by Allan Needell of the National Air and Space Museum. The solar panels face east and west and are oriented 20 degrees off vertical. Labeled versions and a link to the raw file (M109080308R) are available at the LROC website.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (4.7 Mb TIF) and 0.5 m/pixel (2.3 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

29 October 2009 08:14:07 UTC; Solar El/Az 63.8/94.9; LRO altitude 49 km. (1.0 Mb)
West Crater is not in the field-of-view.  A 3x-enlarged detail shows the EASEP components. The location of the possible piece of mylar noted in the 01 October image is marked. The raw LROC file is M111443315R. The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 0.65N/23.42E.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (3.2 Mb TIF) and 0.5 m/pixel (1.3 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

25 November 2009 14:44:11 UTC; Solar El/Az 35.8/92.0; LRO altitude 47 km. (3.7 Mb)
The EASEP components in a 3x-enlarged detail are not prominent. The raw LROC file is M113799518R. The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 1.07N/23.96E.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (5.1 Mb TIF) and 0.5 m/pixel (3.9 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

22 December 2009 22:43:38 UTC; Solar El/Az 8.2/90.7; LRO altitude 47 km. (4.2 Mb)
With the sun low in the east, this image is particuarly useful for identifying boulders and terrain features. The raw LROC file is M116161085R. The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 0.44N/23.66E.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (4.7 Mb TIF) and 0.5 m/pixel (5.9 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

05 January 2010 13:46:07 UTC; Solar El/Az 6.4/269.8; LRO altitude 41 km. (7 Mb)
The image is grainy. With the Sun low in the west, the LRRR and PSEP show up well in a 3x-enlarged detail. The raw LROC file is M117338434R. The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 0.25N/23.29E.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (4.7 Mb TIF) and 0.5 m/pixel (3.1 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

01 February 2010 - First Image - 19:52:11 UTC; Solar El/Az 34.9/270.3; LRO altitude 41 km. ( 1.4 Mb)
Reasonably bright, point-like reflections off the LRRR and PSEP. The raw LROC file is M119693197L. The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 0.03N/24.00E.

Deconvolved, 1.0 m/pixel (2.7 Mb TIF) version by GoneToPlaid.

01 February 2010 - Second Image - 21:45:17 UTC; Solar El/Az 34.0/270.3; LRO altitude 41 km. ( 1.3 Mb)
The LRRR and PSEP are less prominent than in the image taken two hours earlier. The raw LROC file is M119699983R. The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 0.02N/22.97E.

Deconvolved, 1.0 m/pixel (2.4 Mb TIF) version by GoneToPlaid.

01 March 2010 03:50:15 UTC; Solar El/Az 62.3/271.3; LRO altitude 42 km. (3.9 Mb)
The 3x-enlarged detail shows a good trace of Neil's traverse from the LRRR to the southwest rim of Little West Crater and back to the LM. The raw LROC file is M122054682R. The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 0.33N/23.69E.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (3.7 Mb TIF) and 0.5 m/pixel (4.1 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

22 May 2010 02:06:13 UTC; Solar El/Az 36.9/89.2; LRO altitude 41 km. (5.2 Mb)
LRRR, LRRR cover, PSEP, and good definition of Neil's track out to Little West. The raw LROC file is M129133239R. The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 0.7N/23.61E.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (4.9 Mb TIF) and 0.5 m/pixel (3.1 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

18 June 2010 10:00:42 UTC; Solar El/Az 10.8/89.7 ; LRO altitude 40 km. (4.4 Mb)
LRRR, LRRR cover, PSEP, and good definition of Neil's track out to Little West. In the 0.125m, deconvolved version, the east-facing solar panel is brightly illuminated while the shadow cast by the west-facing panel is also sharply defined. The raw LROC file is M131494509L. The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 1.1N/23.31E.

Deconvolved, 0.125 m/pixel (13.9 Mb TIF), 0.25 m/pixel (4.1 Mb TIF) and 0.5 m/pixel (4,8 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

02 July 2010 02:52:17 UTC; Solar El/Az 2.0/270.0; LRO altitude 46 km. (6.2 Mb)
Sunset view of the landing site with primarily crater rims and the body of the LM descent stage illuminated. A 3x detail shows the descent stage shadow overlapping Little West Crater.  The raw LROC file is M132678405R. The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 0.6N/23.38E.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (2.3 Mb TIF) and 0.5 m/pixel (3.9 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

29 July 2010 08:53:03 UTC First Pass; Solar El/Az 28.9/268.8; LRO altitude 46 km. (3.8 Mb)
The area around the LM brightened by the descent engine is easy to identify in a wide view. The raw LROC file is M135032851L. The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 1.07N/24.1E.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (5.9 Mb TIF) and 0.5 m/pixel (6.1 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

29 July 2010 10:46:23 UTC; One Orbit Later; Solar El/Az 27.9/268.9; LRO altitude 46 km. ( 1.4 Mb)
West Crater is out of the LROC field of view. The raw LROC file is M135039651L. The landing site lat/long is 0.67N/23.47E. The LRO spacecraft was at 0.3N/23.05E.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (5.6 Mb TIF) and 0.5 m/pixel (2.0 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.



Landing Site Maps/Images


Apollo 11 Landing Site : Telescopic Images by Ulli and Christian "Pete" Lotzmann

Apollo 11 ESA Smart-1 Image (68k)

ESA caption: "This image, taken by the advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA’s SMART-1 spacecraft, shows the Apollo 11 landing site in the Mare Tranquillitatis on the Moon. AMIE obtained the image on 5 February 2006 from a distance of 1764 kilometers from the surface, with a ground resolution of 159 meters per pixel. The imaged area is centered at a longitude of 23.9 degrees East close to the Moon equator, at 1.7 degrees latitude. The area is close to crater Moltke (outside the field of view of this image) in the Mare Tranquillitatis. The arrow shows the landing site of Apollo 11, where the first men from Earth set foot on another object in our solar system on 20 July 1969. The two prominent craters nearby are named after two of the Apollo 11 astronauts. The first man on the Moon, Armstrong, has a crater named after him outside the field of this image. Credits: ESA/Space-X (Space Exploration Institute)"
Red-Blue Anaglyph from LROC images ((0.8 MB)
Anaglyph by Patrick Vantuyne.
Apollo Zone of Interest (2.1Mb or 0.3Mb)
The Apollo Zone of Interest spanned the Lunar Nearside between latitudes 5 S and 5 N. Eight subregions are labelled and searches for suitable landing site were made in high-resolution imagery of each area, primarily from Lunar Orbiters II and III. The eventual Apollo 11 site is in area IIP-6.
Apollo Zone of Interest ( 2.1Mb or 0.4Mb)
This later map shows five regions, each of which contains one of the five possible Apollo Landing Sites considered for the first landing. These sites were numbered, from east to west, ALS-1 to ALS-5. The eventual Apollo 11 landing site is ALS-2 and is within region IIP-6. Don Wilhelms's book, To a Rocky Moon, contains a wealth of information about site selection. Data from the first three Lunar Orbiter missions are discussed in pages 150-161; and selection of the Apollo 11 site is discussed in pages 188-191.
Apollo Landing Site 2: Flown Apollo 10 Map ( 140k )
This flown map shows the proposed landing ellipse and has three hand-drawn, rough ovals in the southwestern quadrant, possibly areas examined by the Apollo 10 crew in one or more passes over the site. Ulli Lotzmann provides a version with the actual Apollo 11 landing site marked ( 90k ).
Lunar Orbiter Frame 2084 ( 1.3 Mb )
Lunar Orbiter II frame 2084 from the Lunar and Planetary Institute's Lunar orbiter Photo Gallery, with an arrow added to indicate West Crater.
Lunar Orbiter Frame 5076 ( 4.4 Mb )
Lunar Orbiter II frame 5076 from the USGS Astrogeology Research Program's Lunar Orbiter Digitization Project. Eric Nelson has marked the location of the LM and Little West Crater.
Lunar Orbiter Frame 5076 (cropped) ( 84k )
Jim Scotti has provided a cropped version showing West Crater and the landing site. René and Jonathan Cantin have created a film of the Apollo 11 Final Approach ( 10 Mb, wmv ) that is a side-by-side composite of the landing film and LO 5076_h3, with a number of craters matched up in the two views.
Lunar Orbiter compared to LROC ( 25 Mb WMV )
GoneToPlaid has produced an animated comparison between deconvolved/enhanced versions of Lunar Orbiter image 5076_H3 and LROC image M116161085R. The two views have similar lighting.
Selene/Kaguya Image of Tranquility Base ( 183k )
This image was taken on 26 December 2007 with the multi-band imager on-board Japan's lunar orbiting spacecraft. North is at the top. The image was provided from the Japanese language version of the Kaguya Image Gallery by ALSJ Contributor Hiroyasu Hayashi. A labeled version shows both Cat's Paw and West Crater. Eagle landed just west of West Crater in an area which, in this Kaguya image, is relatively bright. High-resolution photographs of the Apollo 15, Apollo 16, and Apollo 17 landing sites taken with the Pan Camera flown in the Service Module's Sim Bay on each of those missions show a bright area around each of the LMs, with the lighter albedo probably due to sweeping of the surface by the descent engine. Journal Contributor Markus Mehring has produced a high-contrast version of the Kaguya image and compares it with the same area of pre-landing photo AS11-37-5447 ( 0.1 Mb ). Markus has also produced a high-contrast version of the image with the Eagle's ground track superimposed ( 0.3 Mb ), demonstrating that the light-colored area is around the LM. The ground track comes from Figure 5-8 in the Apollo 11 Mission Report ( 13 Mb PDF ). Although it is tempting to believe that the bright area seen in the Kaguya image is due to the LM exhaust, it is possible that differences in lighting conditions may be the cause. Higher-resolution imagery will be required before the question can be decided.
Apollo 11 Ground Track mapped onto LROC overlay in Google Moon (5 Mb)
This map shows the ground track during the last 3 minutes 30 seconds of the descent. Each point is marked with the time remaining (mm:ss) until the landing. Many are labeled to indicate transmission from the crew. Ground track by GoneToPlaid.
LM Descent Monitoring Chart - Landing Site No. 2, Sheet 3A Part 1 with Named Features along the Approach Path ( 2.8 Mb)
During the approach to the landing, the LM moves along the ground track from the bottom of the map to the landing ellipse at the top. The longitude range is 32.5 E to 24.5 E. The original map scale is 1:630,000. The named feature at the upper left is probably "Chuck Hole". The feature to the right of the ground track just below "8+00" is "Last Ridge". The feature above and to the left of "Cape Bruce" near the bottom of the scan is "Ruin Basin". Scan courtesy of Stephen Tellier, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston.
LM Descent Monitoring Chart - Landing Site No. 2, Sheet 3A Part 2 with Named Features along the Ascent Path ( 3.2 Mb )
The landing ellipse is off the bottom of the map and, during the return to orbit, the LM moves along the ground track from the bottom of the map toward the top. The longitude range is 23.0 E to 14.0 E. The original map scale is 1:630,000. Scan courtesy of Stephen Tellier, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston.
LM Descent Monitoring Chart - Landing Site No. 2, Sheet 2 Part 1 with Named Features along the Approach Path ( 3.0 Mb )
The longitude range is 53.8 E to 45.3 E The original map scale is 1:630,000. Scan courtesy of Stephen Tellier, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston.
LM Descent Monitoring Chart - Landing Site No. 2, Sheet 2 Part 2 with Named Features along the Approach Path ( 3.0 Mb )
The longitude range is 45.7 E to 36.5 E The original map scale is 1:630,000. Scan courtesy of Stephen Tellier, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston.
LM Descent Monitoring Chart - Landing Site No. 2, Sheet 2 Part 3 with Named Features along the Approach Path ( 2.9 Mb )
The longitude range is 37.5 E to 28.5 E The original map scale is 1:630,000. Scan courtesy of Stephen Tellier, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston.
Descent Flight Path ( 0.6 Mb or 32 Mb )
Thomas Schwagmeier has assembled the Descent Monitoring chart and has used it as a template for lunar maps from the Lunar and Planetary Institute website.
Flown CMP Map LAM-2 ( 2.7 Mb or 0.3 Mb )
Mike Collins used this map to mark the estimated LM locations given to him by Houston. Compare with the sextant locations plotted in Figure 5-14 (below) from the Mission Report. The grid spacing is 1 km and the actual landing site is near J.65 and 7.52. Scan courtesy Bob Craddock and Allan Needell, National Air and Space Museum.

The landing ellipse is centered at map coordinates L.0/14.0 and extends north and south 2.4 km from that point and 9.4 km east and west. Mike Collins marked a number of locations with combinations of lines, arrows, circles, and one ellipse using either pencil or a felt-tipped pen. Most of these are associated with estimated LM locations that were given to him at various times during his solo operations in lunar orbit.

Beginning at the upper left, there is a penciled ellipse labeled 'Auto Optics' and including craters at N.7/7.2 and M.0/6.7 that Mike mentions at 106:43:08. Owen Garriott gave Mike settings for Auto Optics operation of the sextant at 105:19:59; and, at 106:11:49, about 35 minutes before Mike's next pass over the landing site, Bruce McCandless told him "We'd like you to let the Auto optics take care of the tracking and devote your energies to trying to pick out the LM (visually) on the lunar surface."

The 'Auto Optics' ellipse also contains a small circle at L.7/6.6 and attached arrow from the southwest drawn with a felt-tipped pen. I have not been able to associate this circle with anything in the transcript or in Figure 5-14 (below) from the Apollo 11 Mission Report.

Immediately to the right of the upper end of the 'Auto Optics' ellipse, Mike has drawn circle, probably around the 'tiny crater' at M.7/8.0 that he mentions at 104:42:48.

Below the 'Auto Optics' ellipse, a penciled arrow leads to a circle drawn at K.8/6.3. At 112:22:20, Mike requested an estimated LM position for his pass over the landing site at 112:31:52. Bruce McCandless gave him K.9/6.3 and, as can be seen in Figure 5-14 (below), the actual landing site is just outside the sextant field-of-view for this location.

Below and to the right, an arrow drawn with a felt-tipped pen and labeled 'Last Bst Pos Prior L/O' leads to a dark spot at J.5/7.7, which is the estimated location Ron Evans gave Mike at 123:55:23, about a half hour before LM lift off. This location is only about 230 meters from the actual landing site at J.65/7.52. Farther down the map, Mike circled craters at E.3/7.6 and E.8/7.7 and to the left of the E.3/7.6 crater wrote 'SW Rim'. These two craters are in the area he examined during the pass over the landing site at 110:33:40 using the sextant in automatic mode and a set of coordinates Bruce McCandless gave him at 110:18:39. Mike reported the negative results at 110:36:58 but mentioned a "suspiciously-small, white object" on the southwest rim of the E.3/7.6 crater.

Finally, there is a small, blue dot at about K.2/5.6, which may not have been purposefully drawn.

Map LAM-2G ( 356k )

Apollo 11 Landing Site: Mission Report Figure 5-8 ( 347k

This labeled version of 1:5000 LM Lunar Surface Map LSE 2-48 shows the ground track and the landing site about 60 meters west of Little West Crater. The grid squares are 50 meters on a side.
Map LSE 2-48 ( 2.7 Mb or 371k )
Compare with Mission Report Figure 5-8 (above) for the Eagle ground track and the location of the landing site. In a detail ( 750 ), I have marked what is probably a boulder just east of West Crater. The grid squares on this 1:5000 map are 50 meters on a side and the north-south size of the boulder is about 1-2 meters and close to the resolution limit.
Sextant Locations ( 1.6 Mb or 0.4 Mb )
This is figure 5-14 from the Apollo 11 Mission Report and shows the various estimates of the landing location given to MIke Collins while Armstrong and Aldrin were on the surface. Each of the small squares is 1 kilometer on a side and the circles, which represent the approximate sextant field-of-view, are each about 3.2 km (2 miles) in diameter.
Apollo 11 Traverse Map, Defense Mapping Agency ( 0.7 Mb )
This 1978 site map is a product of a long collaboration between the Defence Mapping Agency and the US Geological Survey. It was originally drawn at a scale of 1:250. Compare with a USGS site map dated 11 August 1969. The 1978 map may derive from more sophisticated photogrammetric analysis and the rough-and-ready analysis used to get a map ready for the Preliminary Science Report.
Apollo 11 Traverse Map ( 1.32Mb )
This is figure 10.12 from the Lunar Sourcebook by G.H. Heiken, D.T. Vaniman, and B.M. French, editors, copyright 1991 by Cambridge University Press, and is reproduced with permission. It is dervied from the 1978 air-brush map above.
Traverse Map, Figure 3-16 from the Apollo 11 Preliminary Science Report ( 195 k )
This map shows tracks of footprints that can be identified from mission photographs, film, and TV. Scan by Eric Jones.

Thomas Schwagmeier has re-drafted a high-resolution ( 238 k ) version.

Baseball Comparison ( 2.1 Mb )
Thomas Schwagmeier used a detail from the 5 November 2011 LROC image taken from 25-km altitude to revise his Apollo 11 traverse diagram overlayed on a baseball diamond, based on a suggestion by Eric Jones. LROC image by NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University.
Football (Soccer) Comparison ( 2.2 Mb )
At the suggestion of Joe O'Dea, Thomas Schwagmeier has created an overlay of his Apollo 11 traverse diagram on a football (soccer) pitch.
Landing Site Detail ( 151k )
A comparison of details from Figure 5-8 from the Apollo 11 Mission Report (top) and from the flown copy of LAM-2 (bottom). The latter includes the horizontal 'J' and 'K' lines and the vertical '7' and '8' lines. The resulting box is one kilometer on a side. The actual landing site is near J.65/7.52, sixty meters west of Little West Crater, and the last estimated position given to Mike about half an hour prior to LM lift-off is marked with a felt-tipped pen at J.5/7.7.
Post-Flight Map with Named Features ( 312k )
Phil Stooke, Department of Geography, University of Western Ontario discovered this "untitled, post-flight, Manned Spacecraft Center graphic in the library of the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston.
AS11-37-5437 Map ( 0.3 Mb )
This richly-labeled map of the approach to Tranquility Base was created by Markus Mehring. See, also, figure 1-20a ( 0.8 Mb or 0.1 Mb ) from the Apollo 11 Preliminary Science Report. Compare with a Starry Night view ( 0.2Mb ) of the area at the same time 5437 was taken.
AS11-37-5447 Map ( 0.3 Mb )
This labeled, overhead map of the area around Tranquility Base was created by Markus Mehring. See, also, figure 1-20b ( 0.9Mb ) from the Apollo 11 Preliminary Science Report. Cat's Paw is above and slightly to the right of the landing site in this view.

Mehring notes that rim segments in the Cat's Paw cluster of craters are visible from the surface at the LM, as can be seen in a comparison of a detail from 5447 with portions of frames 5882 and 5882a from Buzz's plus-Z pan.

AS11-37-5447 Map with Landing Ellipse and Immediate Landing Area Marked ( 0.2 Mb )
This labeled map was created by David Harland. A detail from 5447 has been rotated counter clockwise so that east to the right. Flown CMP Map LAM-2 has been used to transfer the ellipse onto 5447; and, finally, a box showing the area covered by Mission Report Figure 5-8.
S69-3716 / Mission Figure 5-8, Final Approach ( 0.3 Mb )
This is figure 5-8 from the Apollo 11 Mission Report and is a composite Lunar Orbiter image covering the final kilometer of the descent path and the immediate landing area.
Photo Map, Figure 3-15 from the Apollo 11 Preliminary Science Report ( HTML Link )
This HTML-encoded diagram shows the locations from which Neil and Buzz took pictures during the EVA. the original map was drawn by R.M. Batson and K.B. Larson and was dated 11 August 1969. HTML coding by Harald Kucharek.

Thomas Schwagmeier has re-drafted a high-resolution, non-HTML version ( 196 k ).

USGS Post-Flight Geology Map Composite ( 590k )
The composite was constructed from high-resolution scans of the map ( 2347k ), the text at the lower left ( 177k ), the central text and scale ( 271k ), the text at the lower right ( 999k ), and the legend ( 999k ). Scans by Frank O'Brien.

Assembled Panoramas

086:18:56 Animated Earthrise Sequence ( 1.2 Mb )

This Earthrise sequence was taken on Rev 6 at about 086:28:15 or 04:00:15 UTC on 20 July 1969. Australia is near the western limb, as can also be seen in a Celestia image generated for that time with an observer 2000 km from the center of the Moon at lat / long 0.0 / 80 E. Animated gif by Paul White.
104:02:26 Post-landing Color Combined Window Pan ( 279k )
These frames were taken out the windows about an hour and half after the landing, and form a contingency panorama in order to briefly document the site, so that the crew wouldn't have left with empty hands in case of a No-Stay decision. Assembled by Karl Dodenhoff before high-resolution scans from the original film became available.

Frames AS11-37-5449 to 5453 form a CDR (left) window pan ( 151k ); and frames AS11-37-5454 to 5458 form an LMP (right) window pan ( 123k ).

104:02:26 Post-landing Color Combined Window Pan - High Resolution ( 4.9Mb or 1.2Mb )
This assembly uses high-resolution scans (OF300) from the original film. The frames are those used in the individual left- and right-window pans that follow, except that "AS11-37-5451 was removed from the final mix to improve rendering around the area of the top of the LM shadow." . Assembled by Syd Buxton.
104:02:26 Post-landing Color CDR (left) Window Pan - High Resolution ( 4.8Mb or 0.8Mb )
This assembly uses high-reolution scans (OF300) from the original film. The frames are AS11-37-5449 to 5453, plus 37-5459, 40-5847 and 40-5848. "Post-EVA frames 37-5497 and 37-5500 were used to help with alignment and to fill in some small gaps." Assembled by Syd Buxton.
104:02:26 Post-landing Color LMP (right) Window Pan - High Resolution ( 4.8Mb or 0.4Mb )
This assembly uses high-reolution scans (OF300) from the original film. The frames are AS11-37-5454 to 5458, plus 40-5849. Assembled by Syd Buxton.
Pre-EVA Double Crater Pan ( 548k )
David Harland as used high-resolution scans of AS11-40-5847 and 5848 by Kipp Teague to create a mini-pan showing the double crater below Neil's window.
109:32:26 Pan 1 ( 0.9 Mb or 0.2 Mb )
Neil took this pan near the bottom of the ladder while he was waiting for Buzz to start out thru the hatch. The frames are AS11-40-5850 to 5858. Pan assembly by Dave Byrne. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.

Full-resolution assembly with derived anaglyphs ( 5.3 Mb ) by Eric Jones.

David Harland has used 5852 to 5854 to create a mini-pan of the double crater ( 2.0Mb ) below Neil's window; and frames 5855 to 5857 to create a mini-pan ( 1.7Mb ) showing the view to the northwest.

109:32:26 Ladder Mini-Pan ( 42k )
After finishing his initial pan, Neil moved 3.9 meters north of the ladder and took three frames toward the south. The frames AS11-40-5859 to 5861. Assembly by Dave Byrne.

High-resolution version ( 3.7 Mb ) and one with anaglyphs in context ( 1.6 Mb ) by Eric Jones.

109:39:43 Buzz on the Porch ( 206k )
Neil took a series of pictures of Buzz's egress and descent to the surface. He also took two frames, AS11-40-5864 and 65 of the area under the descent stage. Dave Byrne has used 5863, 64, and 65 to create this view of Buzz on the porch. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.
109:39:43 Buzz on the Footpad ( 1.8 Mb or 198k )
Jon Hancock has used 5864, 65, and 5869 to create this view of Buzz on the footpad. Jon writes, "I think Neil changed position between 5864/65 and 5869, so the perspective changed slightly; but, by rotating 5969 to correct the horizon and enlarging it a few percent to get the scale to match the other two, they fit together quite well (at least I think so!)". Dave Byrne has created an alternate version ( 469k ) and, with the addition of 5863, a view with Buzz both on the porch and on the footpad ( 559k ). A third version ( 2.1Mb ) has been provided by David Harland.
110:31:47 Pan 2 ( 1.4Mb or 0.3Mb)
Buzz took this pan from due west of the ladder, on the rim of Double Crater. It includes AS11-40- 5881 to 5891. Frame 5886 is the only good Hasselblad image of Neil taken during the EVA. Assemblies by Dave Byrne. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.

High-resolution pan plus anaglyphs in context ( 8.5 Mb by Eric Jones. Other assemblies by Mauro Freschi ( 0.3Mb ); David Harland; and a second portion also from David Harland ( 3.0Mb ).

110:42:14 Buzz and the Bulk Sample Area ( 1.1 Mb )
Neil took AS11-40- 5901 to show the bulk sample area and then raised his aim to get Buzz in 5902. Assembly by Jon Hancock.
110:43:33 Pan 3 ( 1.6 Mb or 0.4 Mb )
Buzz took this pan from the rim of a shallow crater north of the LM. The frames are AS11-40- 5905 to 5916. Assembly by Dave Byrne. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.

Partial version with Neil included on the left (3 Mb). Assembly by Jon Hancock.

High resolution version with anaglyphs in context ( 10 Mb ) by Yuri Krasilnikov and Eric Jones

LM portraits by David Harland ( 3.4Mb ) and Erik van Meijgaarden has created an alternate LM portrait ( 7.5Mb ).

110:53:38 Buzz Removing Passive Seismometer ( 1.2 Mb )
The frames are AS11-40-5928 and 5929. Assembly by Erik van Meijgaarden. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.

David Harland has created an alternate version that includes 5927 ( 2.0Mb ).

110:53:38 Buzz Removing Passive Seismometer - Animated Gif ( 0.6 Mb )
The frames are AS11-40-5927, 28, and 29. See, also, a two-frame version ( 0.3 Mb ) made from 5927 and 28. Assemblies by Yuri Krasilnikov.
110:55:49 Pan 4 ( 9 Mb or 0.9 Mb )
Neil took this pan from a spot southeast of the LM while Buzz's was removing equipment from the SEQ Bay. The frames are AS11-40- 5930 to 5941. Assembly by Yuri Krasilnikov. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.

Anaglyphs with context (12 Mb) by Yuri Krasilnikov and Eric Jones. Other assemblies by Hans Nyberg ( in QuickTime wrap-around format 1.3 Mb ); Erik van Meijgaarden ( 8.2 Mb ); and David Harland ( 3.4Mb ).

111:12:31 Pan 5 (0.6 Mb or 0.2 Mb)
Neil took this sequence of photos on the southwest rim of Little West Crater, which is 60 meters east of the LM. He overflew this 30-m crater during the final approach and, near the end of the EVA ran out to it to take these pictures. The frames are AS11-40-5954 to 5961. Assembly by Eric Jones. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.

Anaglyphs with context ( 8 Mb ) by Eric Jones. Additional assembly by Erik van Meijgaarden version (8.5Mb or 361k)

112:20:56 Post EVA Window Pan (300k)
Neil and Buzz used up the remaining film on magazines 37/R, taking AS11-37-5460 to 5555, and 39/Q, taking AS11-39-5792 to 5839. Bob Farwell has selected frames from Magazine 37/R to create a pan covering both windows.

A second version is presented on a white background.

Note that Farwell's construction involves a certain amount of artistic license because neither Neil or Buzz actually had an unrestricted view from side to side, as shown by pans assembled from Magazine 39/Q images for the CDR window and the LMP window.

Next, Farwell added a frame from the 16-mm DAC mounted in Buzz's window, showing Neil and Buzz erecting the flag.

An additional version, the 16-mm DAC frame is partially transparent, showing the residual differences caused by the fact that the DAC is mounted over the window and is aimed at a steeper angle than that of the Hasselblad.

Finally, Farwell has modified Figure 10.12 from the Lunar Sourcebook to provided a rough comparison with the assembled pan. Farwell has provided a fuller discussion of the assembled pan and related items.

112:20:56 Post-EVA Right Window Pan ( 159k )
These are frames AS11-37-5510 to 5517, taken out Buzz's window. Assembled by Karl Dodenhoff.

A high-resolution version ( 3.5 Mb ) has been done by Eric Jones. The fresh, sharp-rimmed crater beyond and just to the right of the TV camera has been identified in the 8 August 2009 LRO image ( 0.2 Mb of the landing site and is also visible in an anaglyph ( 280k ) made by Yuri Krasilnikov from frames AS11-40-5855 and 56 from Pan 1. The TV camera is about 20 m from Buzz, while the fresh crater is about 70 m away. See, also, a labeled version of the pan and a similarly labelled, animated gif made from the three 2009 LROC images, both by Vlad Pustynski. The LROC have been stretched to correct for E-W foreshortening.

112:20:56 Post-EVA Right Window Pan - Flag and Thrusters ( 2.7Mb )
These are frames AS11-37-5468, 69, and 80 taken out Buzz's window. Assembled by David Harland.
112:20:56 DAC Window Pan 1 ( 0.3 Mb )
Buzz did some quick pans out his window, using the DAC, possibly at this time. Assembly by Ian Regan.
112:20:56 DAC Window Pan 1 ( 0.3 Mb )
Buzz did some quick pans out his window, using the DAC, possibly at this time. Assembly by Ian Regan.
112:20:56 Post-EVA Left Window Pan ( 3.8Mb )
The frames are AS11-37-5496 to 5505. Assembled by Eric Jones.

Pre-Flight Suit Images

S69-38930 ( 885k )

This pre-flight photo shows Buzz's suit in its lunar surface configuration. Note that the sewn-on cuff checklist can be seen on the wrist cover of Buzz's left glove, the one closest to the right suit leg. Note, also, that Buzz is not going to wear a strap-on pocket. See, also, AS11-40-5903. Ken Glover believes that the grey square at the upper right, just below the bubble helmet, is a photographer's grey card; it is certainly not an EMU component. The pattern of Velcro strips and snaps surrounding the connector cluster provided for installation of what seems to have been called an "umbilical cover". There is considerable evidence that the Apollo 11-14 LM crew members' suits all had a similar pattern of Velcro and snaps but, as of June 2007, we have been unable to locate any indication - in photos, checklists, and EMU handbooks - of an umbilical cover having been flown. Karl Dodenhoff has provided a photograph, but doesn't remember where he found it.

Scan by Eric Jones.

S69-38937 ( 136k or 826k )
This pre-flight photo shows Buzz's left glove, including the sewn-on checklist. Scan by Eric Jones.
S69-38937 detail ( 124k )
In the text reproduced below, Neil's items are in parentheses.

LMP(CDR)
Environ Fam (TV Deploy)
Deploy SWC
EVA & Envir Eval - (Bulk S)

Lean/Reach/Walk
Best Pace/Start/Stop
Fast Pace/Traction/Dust
Pene-Photo Footprint
Scuff/Cohesion/Adhesion
Gen EVA Eval
Light-Up/Down/Cross Sun
Color/Contrast/Texture
Reflect/Rocks/Craters
Gen Eval/Phenomena
Panorama
LM Inspect - Quad I
Photo Blk Sam Area
Unstow ALSCC
Panorama
Off-Load EASEP/Deploy PSE
Close-up Photos
Documented Sample Col:
SRC to Strut
Unstow SRC
Core Tube (Hook Bag)
Unstow Scoop & Tongs
Describe & Col Sam -
Feature/Assoc
Age/Amount
Close-up Photos/Casette
Collect Envir/Gas Sam
Bulk Sam/Core/Tube
Clean EMU/Ingress (Photo)
S69-38892 ( 768k )
This pre-flight photo shows Neil's suit in its command module configuration, which includes the black IVA (Intra-vehicular) gloves at the right. Scan by Eric Jones.
S69-38943 ( 918k )
This pre-flight photo shows Neil's IVA (Intra-vehicular) gloves. Scan by Eric Jones.
S69-38889 ( 168k or 812k )
This pre-flight photo shows Neil's suit in its lunar surface configuration, which includes the Liquid Cooled Garment at the left and the EVA (Extra-vehicular) gloves and moon boots at the right. Mike Gentry at NASA Johnson gives a date for the photo of 9 July 1969, but this may represent the date when the photo was released to the public and that the date it was taken was earlier. Research by Frederic Artner.

The suit is shown with a strap-on pocket attached to the left thigh, as was the case during the EVA. In a detail from S69-38889 ( 166k ), we see some horizontal strips of Velcro hooks on the outside of the top flap which, on later missions, mated with horizontal strips of Velcro pile on the suit to hold the flap open. In the detail, we see that a loop of Velcro has been added been attached to the flap and a corresponding strip of Velcro has been attached over the front of the left hip. Further details of a typical strap-on pocket can be found in an Apollo 16 discussion. The suit shown in that discussion is Charlie Duke's training suit, which had horizontal strips of Velcro pile just above the knee, because Charlie wore his strap-on pockets on his shins.

Ulli Lotzmann notes that the card placed between the boots that reads "PGA 076" is wrong. The actual serial number of Neil's PGA is 056. The mistake is undoubtedly due to the fact that the serial number of Neil's suit liner is 076. The person who created the card probably saw the serial number of the liner and thought that was the number for the suit as well.

Journal Contributor Roland Suhr notes that there isn't a mission patch on the suit. Photos S69-38489 to 38517, taken during an EMU Crew and Cabin Fit-and-Function (CCFF) session on 25 June 1969, also show the flight suits without mission patches. Clearly, the patches were put on the suits no earlier than 25 June. On 27 January 2014, ILC Historian Bill Ayrey wrote: "ILC was responsible for preparing the suits which included sewing the patches on. NASA was responsible for providing the patches which as I recall, they bought from a company named Lion Brothers. (Bill is correct. See Gene Dorr's patch webpage.) Ron Woods was one of our ILC suit technicians at the time and actually suited Buzz up for his Apollo 11 mission. " On 28 January 2014, Ron Woods told Ayrey "We were very late on sewing on the Beta (cloth) Flight Patches. Maybe two weeks prior to launch. And, of course, they were top stitched with the sewing machine and then carefully hand sewn through the top layer of the TMG (Thermal-Micrometeoroid Garment)."

S69-CDR Gloves ( 27k )
This pre-flight photo shows Neil's EVA (extra-vehicular) gloves. The sewn-on cuff checklist is clearly visible on the wrist cover on the left (upper) glove. Note that there is also a sewn-on decal in the inside of the wrist cover on the right (lower) glove.
S69-38898 ( 124k or 750k )
This pre-flight photo shows Neil's left glove, including the sewn-on checklist. Scan by Eric Jones.
S69-38898 detail ( 98k )
This pre-flight photo detail shows Neil's sewn-on cuff checklist. In the text reproduced below, Buzz's items are in parentheses.

CDR(LMP)
Transfer Cam
Prel Cks:

LM Status/Photo 3 Gear
Terrain
Lighting/Photo Sam Areas
Photo Egress
TV-Change Lens (Fam)(SWC)
Photo SWC-Cam on Mesa
Bulk Samp (EVA & Envir)
Unstow Bag/Scoop/Hammer
Unpack SRC/Col Samp
Seal SRC (Unstow ALSCC)
Hook Up LEC
LM Inspect-Close Up Photos
Recv Still Camera-Photo
Quad II/-Y Gear
EASEP Off-load/Panorama
EASEP Deploy & Photo
Documented Sample Col:
Stereo Core Tube
Tether Bag/Unstow Gnomon
Photo & Bag Samples
Hold Envir/GSA Samp Cont
Retrv SWC-Soil Mech
Pack/Close SRC (Ingress)
Photo LMP/Cam Mag to LEC
Transfer Bulk SRC
Transfer D.S. SRC
S69-CDR Gloves ( 25k )
This pre-flight photo shows Neil's IV (Intravehicular) gloves, which were worn for suited operations in the spacecraft and lacked the various thermal layers present on the EVA gloves. Lacking the thermal layers, the IV gloves were far more flexible than the EVA gloves.
Pre-flight X-ray of Neil's Boots ( 235k )
This x-ray was taken on JUly 7, 1969 by Jack R Weakland who worked in the NASA x-ray lab from 1968 to 1979 and told Ulli Lotzmann in 2002 that " he x-rayed everything from pipe welds to the astronaut moon boots, PGA suits etc. One purpose of this x-ray was to determine and verify that there were no sharp, foreign objects imbedded in the cloth - that is, needle points, pins etc. - that could puncture the pressure suit." Scan by Ulrich Lotzmann.

Crew and Equipment Pre-Flight

S64-23846 ( 910k )

This group portrait was taken at Philmont Scout Ranch in northeastern New Mexico during a 3-6 June 1964 geology field trip. From left to right, they are: Pete Conrad, Buzz Aldrin, Dick Gordon, Ted Freeman, Charlie Bassett, Walt Cunningham, Neil Armstrong, Donn Eisele, Rusty Schweikhart (behind Eisele), Jim Lovell, Mike Collins (partly hidden behind Lovell), Elliot See, Gene Cernan (behind See), Ed White, Roger Chaffee, Gordon Cooper, C.C. Williams (behind Cooper), Bill Anders, Dave Scott, Al Bean.

Journal Contributor Jim Scotti writes "It's a bit sad looking at this image to note that six of the twenty gentlemen in it didn't even live to see the first moon landing; and six of the twenty left footprints on the Moon. They had an equal chance of dying before the first landing or walking on the Moon. Amazingly, we've only lost two of the fourteen who survived until July 1969; and I hope at least a few of them are still around when the next footprints are left on the Moon."

Journal Contributor Brian Lawrence adds "One thing I find interesting with photos such as this is who is missing from the photo. Twenty out of the thirty astronauts who had been selected by June 3, 1964 took part in the Philmont Ranch trip. Those missing were, from the first (Mercury) group were Glenn ('retired' a few months earlier), Carpenter (recently returned to the USN), Shepard & Slayton (both grounded), and Grissom & Schirra (assigned to Gemini 3). Also missing, from the second group, were Young and Stafford (also assigned to GT-3) plus McDivitt and Borman (commander and backup commander of GT-4)." Scan by Colin Burgess.

S64-23847 ( 688k )
Additional group portrait taken at Philmont Scout Ranch. Collins is not hidden by Lovell. In the caption for this picture in his excellent book To a Rocky Moon, Don Wilhelms writes "As they posed, they realized their resemblance to a glee club and spontaneously hummed a note to establish pitch." Scan courtesy Mike Gentry, NASA Johnson.
S64-31453 ( 163k or 749k )
1964 portrait of Neil Armstrong. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S67-33609 ( 196k )
Ken Mattingly (left) and Neil Armstrong (right) during a geology field trip in Iceland in 1967. Scanned by Ken Glover from Gene Simmon's 'On the Moon with Apollo 16 - A Guidebook to the Descartes Region'.
S68-40109 ( 130k or 671k )
Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. paddles to the shore of Lake Texoma during training at the U.S. Air Force Air Defense Command Life Support School, Perrin Air Force Base, Sherman, Texas. He sits in a one-man life raft. He was dropped into water after making parasail ascent some 400 feet above the lake. Purpose of the training is to prepare pilots for possible ejection from aircraft during flight. 6-7 May 1968. Scan and caption courtesy NASA Johnson.
S68-40394 ( 102k or 725k )
Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. is strapped into parachute harness during training at the U.S. Air Force Air Defense Command Life Support School, Perrin Air Force Base, Sherman, Texas. Purpose of the training is to prepare pilots for possible ejection from aircraft during flight. 6-7 May 1968. Scan and caption courtesy NASA Johnson.
S68-40395 ( 113k or 785k )
Similar to S68-40394. 6-7 May 1968. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S68-43475 ( 125k or 598k )
Neil Armstrong during parachute training at Perrin AFB in Sherman, Texas. 27 May 1968. Research by J.L. Pickering.
69-H-152 ( 91k )
Apollo 11 Lunar Surface Television Camera. Scan by Frederic Artner.
Westinghouse B&W TV Camera -Top Surface ( 99k )
In addition to a framing rate switch, the top of this camera has marks to indicate the field-of-view when either the "35 degree Lunar Day lens" or the "80 degree Wide Angle lens" was in use. On the left, a two-position allows a choice of framing rate of either 10 frames per second or 0.625 fps. The latter was never used on the Moon. In January 2010, Mike Dinn initiated what became an extended exchange of e-mail about the 0.625 fpd mode. The discussion ultimately included Dinn, Dick Holl (Bendix/OTC), Colin Mackellar (editor of the HSK website), Dick Nafzger (GSFC), John Sarkissian (Parkes), John Saxon (HSK), Dwight Steven-Boniecki (author of Live TV from the Moon, and Bill Wood (GDS). Early in the exchange, Wood remember that, while he was doing a final edit of the restored telecast combined with the Flight Director's loop, "I noted Network telling Flight ... that they were ready to handle the super-slow scan rate during the start of Neil’s TV Panorama. To me that indicates they planned to support that mode if needed." Nafzger added, "we had the capability to handle the .625 mode and it was intended to look at rocks, etc. as a basic still shot…..we did test it and it was fine, but once they started using the 10fps and the worldwide excitement built, Stan (Lebar) said they didn’t want to take any chances switching modes!!! They were afraid that they couldn’t get back to live tv!!" Holl said, " I remember testing (the 0.625 fps mode) in our downstairs lab (at Australia's Overseas Telecommunication Commission facility at Paddington in Sydney)) and it worked fine." Photo taken at the National Air and Space Museum in August 2004 by Ulrich Lotzmann.
S69-16682 ( 102k or 457k )
Buzz Aldrin (left), Neil Armstrong, and Mike Collins pose in business suits following a press conference at the Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston. 10 January 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-18994 ( 151k or 1083k )
Astronaut Don L. Lind does a trial deployment of the Apollo 11 Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASEP) in Building 9 at the Manned Spacecraft Center. 21 January 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-17210 ( 170k or 969k or 1.8 Mb )
Astronaut Don L. Lind does a trial deployment of the Apollo 11 erectable S-Band antenna and Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASEP) in Building 9 at the Manned Spacecraft Center. Buzz watches from the left. 21 January 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-17211 ( 147k or 872k or 872k )
Astronaut Don L. Lind does a trial deployment of the Apollo 11 erectable S-Band antenna and Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASEP) in Building 9 at the Manned Spacecraft Center. Buzz watches from the left. A detail shows the fleixible-cable 'crank' used to adjust aiming in azimuth or elevation and the sighting 'glass' used to check aiming. 21 January 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
EL-1996-00223 ( 188k or 633k )
Neil Armstrong poses at the Lunar Landing Research Facility at NASA Langley. 12 February 1969. Scan courtesy NASA.
S69-25908 ( 2 Mb )
Neil and Buzz document a sample during a field trip at Sierra Blanca in west Texas. Buzz is wearing a bright-red jacket with a distinctive black steer logo on the left breast. Stephen O. Moshier and Mark Griffin call attention to S64-23846, a photo taken during a 3-6 June field trip by 20 Apollo astronauts to Philmont Scout Ranch in northwestern New Mexico. Buzz is second from the left between Pete Conrad and Dick Gordon. Buzz and all the others were wearing jackets with the same steer logo. Moisher tells us that he used to have one of the Philmont jackets and that they were bright red. 24 February 1969. Scan courtesy Mike Gentry, NASA Johnson.
S69-25944 ( 163k or 890k )
Buzz Aldrin (left) and Neil Armstrong examine rock samples in west Texas near Sierra Blanca and the ruins of Fort Quitman, about 130 kilometers southeast of El Paso. Apollo 16 geology team leader Bill Muehlberger writes, "The Sierra Blanca trip was the only trip specifically on geology for the Apollo 11 crew. They went into the large arroyos to learn how to sample when a variety of rocks are spread out." 24 February 1969. Research by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-25196 ( 124k or 735k)
Buzz (left) and Neil during the Sierra Blanca trip. 24 February 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-25197 ( 117k or 700k)
Neil examines a rock sample during the Sierra Blanca trip. He is holding a geology hammer in his left hand and is wearing an Omega Speedmaster watch. Journal contributor Dan Buchan notes "his watch shows 1:12:33." 24 February 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-25198 ( 105k or 617k)
Neil Armstrong examines a sample during the Sierra Blanca trip. 24 February 1969. Research by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-25199 ( 176k or 804k )
With Back-up Commander Jim Lovell (left) looking on and holding a Hasselblad, Back-up Lunar Module Pilot Fred Haise (right) examines a sample during the Sierra Blanca trip. Both have geology hammers stowed in tool belts. Haise also has what looks like a tape recorder attached to the front of his belt. The leather pouch on Lovell's left hip may also hold a tape recorder. The recorders would capture any descriptions they made of the samples which, after the end of the session, could be discussed with the trainers. 24 February 1969. Research by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-25200 ( 198k or 946k)
Jim Lovell (left) and Fred Haise appear to be standing on the back gate of a 4-wheel-drive vehicle. They are probably doing an initial evaluation of the site, equivalent to the out-the-window descriptions the later crews did soon after landing on the Moon. 24 February 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-25201 ( 145k or 808k)
Buzz (left) appears to be taking a handheld "before" photograph of a sample, undoubtedly one of the rocks near the head of the tongs Neil has in his right hand. Neil has a tape recorder on his belt and a large box scoop in his left hand. Note that the extension handle attached to the top of the scoop shaft is not symmetric. Note, also, that neither the scoop shaft nor the extension handle shaft have knurled sections for better gripping, as was the case of the flown items.

The fact that Buzz is taking a handheld photo may be an indication that the idea of using a bracket on the RCU had not yet emerged. The camera handle appears to be attached to a lanyard, which also suggests that the RCU camera bracket is still in the future. Buzz has a hammer holder on his belt over his right hip and has a weigh bag hooked to his right, front pocket. Inside the weigh bags, we see the telltale shape of at least one closure tab on an individual sample bag. As can be seen in photo S69-25202, Buzz has a pack of individual sample bags attached to weigh bag. The pack of sample bags is badly out-of-focus but, in S69-25903, an identical pack is clearly visible attached to Jack Swigert's weigh bag. 24 February 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.

S69-25202 ( 156k or 759k)
Buzz (left) takes a handheld documentation photo while Neil appears to be using the tongs to collect a sample. He may be leaning on the scoop for support or may intend to put the sample in it. This photo clearly shows the lanyard attached to the camera handle that Buzz has around his neck. It also shows that he has a carabiner attached to the weigh bag hooked onto the opening of his right, front pocket. 24 February 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-25203 ( 229k or 1108k)
Buzz may be taking a panorama. 24 February 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-25204 ( 199k or 991k)
Neil applies his geology hammer to a sample presumably collected from the vertical face beyond him. That face contains numerous rocks embedded in soil, with clear evidence of layering. Buzz is beyond Neil, probably bent over to pick up a rock. 24 February 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-25334 ( 134k or 716k)
Buzz (left) and Neil examine a sample during the Sierra Blanca field trip. The jackets suggest that this is a morning photo. 24 February 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-25460 ( 132k or 497k )
Jim Lovell leans on a boulder during the Sierra Blanca field trip. Jack Schmitt is immediately behind Jim while Fred Haise is to our left. 24 February 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague/Ed Hengeveld.
S69-25466 ( 244k or 1055k )
Lunch at the Sierra Blanca field trip. Lovell and Haise are in the left foreground and Armstrong and Aldrin (back to the camera) are in the background. As detailed in a labeled version, the other individuals in the group are Support Team members Bill Pogue and Jack Swigert; MSC Geology Branch Chief Ted Foss; MSC geologists Uel Clanton, John Dietrich, Bob Long, (possibly) Mike McEwen, and David McKay; Ray Zedeker of the MSC Training Office; and Bob Sutton of the USGS Astrogeology Branch. 24 February 1969. Identifications courtesy John Dietrich and Uel Clanton, December 2002. Dietrich believes the NASA photographer was Andrew 'Pat' Patnesky, confirmed by Mike Gentry of NASA JSC Media Services. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-25891 ( 214k or 1166k )
Neil and Buzz on the Sierra Blanca geology trip with Mike McEwen, a member of the Manned Spacecraft Center's Geology Branch who participated in astronaut geology training. 24 February 1969. McEwen identification courtesy John Dietrich, August 2002. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-25894 ( 170k or 1104k )
Apollo 11 Support Team members Bill Pogue (foreground) and Jack Swigert (hidden behind Pogue), with Bob Long of the Manned Spacecraft Center's Geology Branch (left), and Bob Sutton of the USGS Astrogeology Branch (right) during the Sierra Blanca geology trip. Identifications courtesy Jack Schmitt, John Dietrich, and Uel Clanton in 2002. 24 February 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-25901 ( 170k or 1104k )
From the left, Neil Armstrong (blue shirt), Buzz Aldrin, Jim Lovell, Fred Haise, Bill Pogue (blue flight suit), and Jack Swigert collect samples. 24 February 1969. Scan courtesyNASA Johnson.
S69-25902 ( 197k or 1088k )
Fred Haise (left) and Jim Lovell, the Apollo 11 Back-up LM crew on the Sierra Blanca geology field trip. Haise has the tongs in his right hang and seems to have a tape recorder around his neck. Lovell is holding the scoop in his right hand, a small sample bag in his left, has a clear teflon weigh bag in a frame suspended from his belt on his left hip, and a geology hammer just visible on his right hip. 24 February 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague/Ed Hengeveld.
S69-25903 ( 173k or 1059k )
Apollo 11 Support Team members Jack Swigert (left) and Bill Pogue (right) discuss a sample during the Sierra Blanca geology trip. Pogue has a tape recorder and Swigert has a weigh bag and a pack of individual sample bags. 24 February 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-25908 ( 182k or 832k )
Neil (left) watches Buzz take a documentary photo of a sample. 24 February 1969. Scan courtesyNASA Johnson.
S69-25921 ( 195k or 909k )
Neil and Buzz at Sierra Blanca. 24 February 1969. Scan courtesyNASA Johnson.
S69-25928 ( 173k or 790k )
Neil and Buzz at Sierra Blanca. The jackets and Neil's gloves indicate that this is a morning photograph. 24 February 1969. Scan courtesyNASA Johnson.
S69-32263 ( 206k or 700k )
Guenter Wendt works with the Apollo 11 backup crew during an altitude chamber test. 24 March 1969. Research by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-32261 ( 208k or 1008k )
Jim Lovell,the Back-up Commander, slides into the Command Module for an altitude chamber test. 24 March 1969. Research by Ed Hengeveld. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
69-H-661 ( 116k or 823k )
Neil Armstrong suited for a training exercise at the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston. Photo filed 18 April 1969. Neil and Buzz's did suited training sessions on both the 15th and 18th of April, 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-674 ( 127k )
Buzz (left) pours a sample out of the large scoop into a sample bag Neil is holding. On the Moon it would have been difficult for Buzz to bend the suit enough to get his hands this close together and probably would have had to hold the scoop in one hand and turn the basket around a horizontal axis to make the pour. Neil and Buzz ran short of time during their EVA and did not collect any documented samples. 15 April 1969. Photo filed 18 April 1969. The training session may have actually been on 15 April 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
69-H-663 ( 0.3 Mb or 1.2 Mb )
EVA training photo taken 18 April 1969 shows Neil Armstrong checking his deployment of the erectable S-Band antenna while Buzz Aldrin uses the tongs to gather a sample. During the mission, communications with Houston was deemed to be good enough that erection of the S-Band antenna was skipped. Similar antenna were erected by the Apollo 12 and Apollo 14 crews to allow signal transmission from the color television camera used on those flights. Scan courtesy Margaret Persinger/KSC.
69-H-669 ( 139k or 1242k )
Neil uses the large scoop. Photo filed 18 April 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31042 ( 188k or 945k )
Neil Armstrong stands in the footpad at the base of the ladder during training. It is unlikely that he is going to try to get up on the ladder. In lunar gravity, the jump was not difficult when pushing with the legs and pulling with the arms. On Earth, even with a lightweight PLSS mockup, the weight of the suit makes the jump too difficult to try. Photo dated 18 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31043 ( 234k or 1327k )
Neil Armstrong uses the Lunar Equipment Conveyor at the foot of the ladder during training. Because he is standing to the left of the ladder and has only a short length of the LEC, he may be trying to get the straps over the porch rails to get them out of the way for Buzz's exit from the cabin. See S68-31053, below. Probably 15 or 18 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31044 ( 241k or 1282k )
Neil at the MESA during training. Note that Neil has a camera bracket on the front of his RCU. 15 or 18 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31045 ( 238k or 1293k )
Neil assembles the contingency sampler during training. 15 or 18 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31046 ( 233k or 1365k )
Neil uses the contingency sampler during training. 15 or 18 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31047 ( 227k or 1349k )
Neil uses the contingency sampler during training. 15 or 18 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31048 ( 199k or 1155k )
Neil collects the contingency sample during training, as he did during the mission at 109:33:30. Photo dated 18 April 1969. See the Apollo 11 Crew Training Summaries. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31049 ( 192k or 1161k )
Neil prepares to remove the sample bag from the contingency sampler during training. 15 or 18 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31050 ( 192k or 1161k )
Neil with the contingency sample bag. He no longer has the other components of the sampler, which may have been taken out of the way by the person behind him. During the mission, he discarded the handle and other components. 15 or 18 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31051 ( 230k or 1270k )
Neil with the contingency sample bag. Comparing with 31050, we see that he has opened flap of the pocket on his left thigh. Note the Velcro strips which hold the flap closed. Neil will put the sample bag in the pocket. 15 or 18 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31052 ( 187k or 1031k )
Neil during training, trailing a comm cable. 15 or 18 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31053 ( 202k or 1116k )
Neil near the foot of the ladder. Note that the LEC straps are, indeed, outside the porch railing on the MESA side. 15 or 18 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31054 ( 224k or 1315k )
Neil with a camera mounted on his RCU bracket. note the S-Band antenna package stowed in an equipment bay to the right of the ladder. 15 or 18 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31055 ( 181k or 1116k )
Neil at the S-Band antenna stowage bay. The person hidden beyond Neil has his hand resting on the side of the simulator and may be discussing removal of the antenna package with Neil. 15 or 18 April 1969. Scans courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31056 ( 0.2 Mb or 1.2 Mb or 2.6 Mb )
Neil carrying the deployable S-band antenna during training. 15 or 18 April 1969. A detail shows the antenna package. Scans courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31057 ( 0.2 Mb or 1.0 Mb or 2.4 Mb )
Neil prepares to deploy S-band antenna, apparently ensuring that he has a rough alignment. If Neil had actually done the alignment during the EVA, the earth would have been about 60 degrees above the western horizon. That is roughly the direction, relative to the orientation of the simulator, Neil is looking. Evidently, someone identified a feature on the ceiling at about the right relative azimuth and elevation to give Neil a sense of the direction, relative to the spacecraft, and how high up he'd have to look to find Earth. 15 or 18 April 1969. Scans courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31058 ( 0.2 Mb or 1.2 Mb or 2.6 Mb )
Neil has one of the three telescoping legs and the transmitting element extended. He appears to be locking the leg in its extended position. 15 or 18 April 1969. Scans courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31059 ( 0.2 Mb or 1.0 Mb or 2.4 Mb )
Neil has the S-Band antenna fully deployed and is reaching to the crank with which he will pointed the dish in azimuth and elevation. See also a close-up of the crank. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31060 ( 236k or 1278k )
Neil at the MESA. Note the TV lens peeking out from the thermal blanket, pointed at the foot of the ladder. Journal Contributor John Sarkissian has located the TV lens in the same configuration in an enhanced detail from AS11-40-5866. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31061 ( 215k or 1138k )
Neil at the MESA. He has opened the thermal blankets. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31062 ( 192k or 1012k )
Buzz joins Neil for the training session. Note that Buzz does not have a camera bracket on his RCU. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31063 ( 199k or 1012k )
Buzz and Neil (background) at the MESA) Note the tie-down strap hanging down from just below Buzz's RCU and the carabiner at the bottom of the strap. Note, also, the checklist fastened to Buzz's left gauntlet. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31064 ( 142k or 900k )
Mike Collins prior to centrifuge training. 14 April 1969, Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31065 ( 158k or 925k )
Mike Collins prior to centrifuge training. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31066 ( 204k or 1090k )
Mike Collins prior to centrifuge training. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31067 ( 188k or 1039k )
Mike Collins during centrifuge training. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31068 ( 195k or 1064k )
Mike Collins during centrifuge training. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31069 ( 193k or 1037k )
Mike Collins during centrifuge training. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31070 ( 195k or 1076k )
Mike Collins during centrifuge training. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31071 ( 199k or 1028k )
Mike Collins from above during centrifuge training. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31072 ( 196k or 1010k )
Mike Collins from above during centrifuge training. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31073 ( 214k or 823k )
Buzz Aldrin works at the MESA during training. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31074 ( 208k or 1153k )
Neil (foreground) and Buzz at the MESA during training. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31075 ( 208k or 1162k )
Neil places a rock box on the MESA table. Journal Contributor Ed Hengeveld notes that Owen Garriott is immediately beyond Neil, wearing a tie but no jacket. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31076 ( 204k or 1167k )
Neil opens the rock box. An extension handle is sticking out below is right hand. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31077 ( 211k or 1266k )
Neil collects a soil sample with the large, box scoop. Note the weigh bag attached to the near corner of the MESA. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31078 ( 227k or 1391k )
Neil pours the soil sample in the weigh bag. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31079 ( 217k or 1265k )
Neil closes the rock box, probably with the weigh bag inside, while Buzz watches. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31080 ( 231k or 1239k )
This training photo shows Neil closing the righthand latch on rock box at the MESA table. Note the ETB on the near corner of the table and the tool handle sticking out of it. Photo dated 18 April 1969. The training session was almost certainly on 15 April 1969. Research by Paolo Dangelo. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31081 ( 216k or 1300k )
Neil (left) and Buzz during training. Note that Buzz is wearing the RCU camera bracket and an attached camera. A person in the background seems to be checking out the high-gain antenna. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31082 ( 162k or 991k )
Neil near the LM mockup with the Solar Wind Collector on the righthand edge of the image. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31083 ( 189k or 1035k )
Buzz has the seismometer on the surface after removing it from the Scientific Equipment (SEQ) Bay. The Lunar Ranging Retro Reflector (LRRR or LR-Cubed) is still in the bay. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31087 ( 119k or 712k )
Close-up side view of Neil wearing a camera on his RCU camera bracket. Good detail of his LEVA tabs. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31088 ( 97k or 675k )
Close-up front view of Buzz during training, with the LM mock-up reflected in his face plate. Good detail of his microphones and LEVA tabs. 15 or 18 April 1969 Research by J.L. Pickering. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31089 ( 88k or 664k )
Close-up front view of Buzz at the ladder. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31091 ( 125k or 738k )
Neil works with the rock box at the MESA. Deke Slayton is in the background in dark jacket, tie, and dark glasses. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31092 ( 125k or 738k )
Neil works with the rock box at the MESA. Deke Slayton is in the background in dark jacket, tie, and dark glasses. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31093 ( 102k )
Buzz during suited training. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S69-31098 ( 157k or 885k )
Neil uses the Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC) to send a mock-up of a rock box up to the cabin. The rock box he was working with previously during this training session is still on the MESA table. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31099 ( 166k or 944k )
Neil uses the Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC) to send a mock-up of a rock box up to the cabin. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31101 ( 164k or 814k )
Neil uses the Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC) to send a mock-up of a rock box up to the cabin. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31102 ( 157k or 899k )
Neil uses the Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC) to send a mock-up of a rock box up to the cabin. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31103 ( 162k or 937k )
Neil uses the Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC) to send a mock-up of a rock box up to the cabin. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31104 ( 162k or 937k )
Neil gets a rest. Research by J.I. Pickering. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31105 ( 157k or 849k )
Neil works at the MESA while Buzz takes a plus-Y pan. On the Moon, this will be north of the spacecraft. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31106 ( 170k or 961k )
Neil works at the MESA while Buzz takes a plus-Y pan. On the Moon, this will be north of the spacecraft. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31107 ( 166k or 927k )
Neil works at the MESA while Buzz takes a plus-Y pan. On the Moon, this will be north of the spacecraft. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31108 ( 191k or 987k )
Buzz continues a plus-Y during training. 15 or 18 April 1969 Note that the camera doesn't appear to have the trigger assembly of the silver-colored EVA camera. Compare with KSC-69PC-362. 15 or 18 April 1969 Research by J.L. Pickering. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31109 ( 174k or 972k )
Neil works at the MESA while Buzz takes a plus-Y pan. On the Moon, this will be north of the spacecraft. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31110 ( 143k or 810k )
A technician works on Buzz's PLSS at left. Neil, on the right, would not be able to lean as far forward on the Moon without support. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31111 ( 149k or 850k )
Buzz (left) and Neil during training. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31112 ( 132k or 752k )
Buzz prepares to remove the seismometer from the Scientific Equipment (SEQ) Bay. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31113 ( 173k or 971k )
Buzz (left) with the seismometer and Neil (right) with the LRRR. During the mission, Buzz carried both packages away from the LM while Neil followed behind taking pictures. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31114 ( 171k or 917k )
The fully deployed seismometer is in the foreground with the LRRR beyond it near Buzz. Neil is on the right. They both appear to be resting. The SWC is near the far edge of the training area at center. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31115 ( 169k or 973k )
Buzz is about to unstow the rockbox while Neil watches from the foreground. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31116 ( 165k or 897k )
Buzz is about to open the rock box so he can remove the core tubes. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31117 ( 143k or 714k )
Neil (left) watches Buzz open the rock box. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31118 ( 156k or 827k )
Neil (left) watches Buzz remove weigh bags and other contents of the rock box so he can get at the core tubes. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31119 ( 150k or 813k )
Neil (left) watches Buzz remove the contents of the rock box. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31120 ( 156k or 878k )
Neil (rear) takes a documentation photo of the core tube Buzz has driven into the surface. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31121 ( 157k or 854k )
Neil (rear) watches Buzz remove the core tube. 15 or 18 April 1969 The SWC is on the left. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31122 ( 151k or 796k )
Neil (left) and Buzz practice collecting documented samples. Neil has a weigh bag attached at his waist and is holding an individual sample bag while Buzz prepares to use the tongs. There is a gnomon on the surface between them and the large, box scoop just beyond it. During the Apollo 11 EVA, Neil and Buzz rain out of time before they could do any documented sampling. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31123 ( 162k or 862k )
Buzz (right) uses the tongs to collect a small rock while Neil holds open an individual sample bag. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31124 ( 167k or 905k )
Neil holds out an individual sample bag to receive the rock Buzz has in his tongs. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31125 ( 166k or 885k )
Buzz (right) collects a sample with the tongs. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31126 ( 164k or 800k )
Buzz (right) prepares to drop a sample from the tongs into an individual sample bag Neil is holding open for him. On the Moon, they would not have been able to bend the suits as much as they could in terrestrial gravity. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31127 ( 165k or 902k )
Neil (left) takes a documentation photo of the sampling area. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31128 ( 168k or 938k )
Buzz (foreground) drops a rock sample in an individual sample bag Neil is holding open for him. Neil is wearing a weigh bag clipped at his waist and has a pack of sample bags clipped to the top of the weight bag. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31129 ( 172k or 980k )
Buzz (foreground) drops a rock sample in an individual sample bag Neil is holding open for him. Neil is wearing a weigh bag clipped at his waist and has a pack of sample bags clipped to the top of the weight bag. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31130 ( 172k or 947k )
Buzz (right) pours a soil sample into an individual sample bag. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31131 ( 155k or 852k )
Neil (left) holds an individual sample bag containing a small quantity of soil. 15 or 18 April 1969 Buzz has the large, box scoop. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31132 ( 165k or 907k )
Neil (left) drops the soil sample bag in the weigh bag. Buzz has the large, box scoop. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31133 ( 170k or 868k )
Neil (right) and Buzz at the MESA after the documented sampling. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31134 ( 166k or 857k )
Neil (right) and Buzz at the MESA after the documented sampling. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31135 ( 142k or 799k )
Buzz (right) collecting a soil sample with the large, box scoop. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31136 ( 142k or 799k )
Buzz (right) collecting a soil sample with the large, box scoop. Neil may be taking a documentation photo. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31137 ( 168k or 895k )
Neil (right) and Buzz at the MESA. The Lunar Equipment Transfer Bag is hanging from the near corner of the MESA. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31138 ( 167k or 899k )
Neil (left) is holding the Small Environmental Sample Container into which Buzz will put a small rock. LIke the documented sampling, this task was not done during the mission due to lack of time. 15 or 18 April 1969 A detail ( 126k ) zooms in on the container. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31139 ( 166k or 867k )
Neil (foreground) packs the rock box. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31140 ( 167k or 902k )
Neil packs the rock box while Buzz retrieves the Solar Wind Collector (SWC) in the background. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31141 ( 135k or 812k )
Buzz photographed from behind the ladder. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31142 ( 139k or 822k )
Neil uses the Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC). Note that the MESA is covered with its thermal blankets. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31143 ( 153k or 864k )
Neil uses the Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC) to transfer what is probably a camera down from the cabin. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31144 ( 159k or 849k )
Neil appears to be discussing the camera transfer with someone off-camera to the right. 15 or 18 April 1969 Note that the LEC straps are now outside the porch rail on the MESA side. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31145 ( 163k or 887k )
Neil has started walking toward the camera, moving his hands along the straps while maintaining some tension. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31146 ( 139k or 800k )
Neil now has the camera on his RCU bracket. Note the tech sitting in the LM hatch. He was undoubtedly in the cabin playing Buzz's role in the camera transfer. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31147 ( 148k or 859k )
Neil walks off the training surface, still wearing the camera. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31148 ( 0.2 Mb or 1.0 Mb or 1.8 Mb )
Neil with the package containing the deployable S-Band antenna. He would have done the deployment during the mission if the signal thru the LM antenna had been unacceptable. It was adequate, so this time-consuming task was skipped. Here's Neil may be looking at a procedures decal on the top plate. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scans courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31149 ( 0.2 Mb or 0.9 Mb or 1.7 Mb )
Similar to 31148. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scans courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31150 ( 0.2 Mb or 1.0 Mb or 1.8 Mb)
Neil is removing a cover plate from the top of the package. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scans courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31151 ( 0.2 Mb or 1.0 or 1.7 Mb )
Neil has the restraining ring in his right hand and is going to discard it. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31152 ( 0.2 Mb or 1.0 Mb or 2.3 Mb )
Neil raises the receiver/transmitter mast of the deployable S-Band antenna. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scans courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31153 ( 0.2 Mb or 1.0 Mb or 1.9 Mb )
Neil is about the extend one of the three telescoping legs. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31154 ( ).2 Mb or 1.0 Mb or 1.8 Mb )
Neil is raising the third leg, which is mostly hidden behind the mast. Next he will removed restraining strap and let the legs swing outwards on pivots at the bottom of the package until they are lying on the surface. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scans courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31155 ( 0.2 Mb or 0.8 Mb or 1.5 Mb )
Neil has all three legs deployed and is lifting the main body until the legs come inward toward the locked position. Note that the entire package has a lunar weight of only 1 kg. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31156 ( 0.2 Mb or ).9 Mb or 1.6 Mb )
Neil has raised the S-Band antenna higher, bringing the legs farther inward . 15 or 18 April 1969 Scanss courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31157 ( 0.2 Mb or 0.9 Mb or 1.6 Mb )
Similar to 31156. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31158 ( 0.2 Mb or 0.9 Mb or 1.6 Mb )
Neil now has the antenna raised to full height, with the legs in their final configuration. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31159 ( 0.2 Mb or 0.9 Mb or 1.7 Mb )
Neil is removing a rib protector that bound the umbrella ribs at the bottom. See, also, a detail. Neil will let the rib protector slide down the leg on our right. In the foreground, the carry bar lies on top of the umbrella cover. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31160 ( 0.2 Mb or 0.9 Mb or 1.6 Mb )
The rib protector can be seen wrapped around the bottom on the leg at the lower right. Neil is releasing the trigger lanyard. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31161 ( 0.2 Mb or 0.9 Mb or 1.6 Mb )
Neil has the trigger lanyard. When used, the trigger will release the strap warpped around the middle of the umbrella, allowing it to spring open. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31162 ( 0.1 Mb or 0.8 Mb or 1.5 Mb )
Neil has pulled the release cord. Note that Neil is holding one of the legs with his left hand, undoubtedly to keep the antenna from jumping and, possibly, tipping over, in reaction to the umbrella springing open. As Pete Conrad told the press during a post-Apollo 12 news conferenced, "I know many of you've seen it deployed in practice. It said on the instructions (that) when you deploy it, it unfolds and springs out. But it (also) said (to) hold on to the leg; and I really didn't hold on to the leg too well; and, when I deployed it, it jumped about 4 feet in the air." Ulli Lotzmann has sketched the scene ( 227k ). 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31163 ( 0.2 Mb or 0.8 Mb or 1.6 Mb )
Neil with the S-Band antenna now open. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31164 ( 0.1 Mb or 0.8 Mb )
Neil at the MESA with the S-Band cable. Note that his Hasselblad is mounted to an RCU mock-up. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31165 ( 0.1 Mb or 0.8 Mb or 1.6 Mb )
Neil at the S-Band antenna. A detail shows the sighting glass and crank. A second detail shows the rib protector on the surface. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31166 ( 139k or 807k )
Buzz during suited EVA training in MSC Building 9. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31167 ( 134k or 785k )
Buzz during suited EVA training in MSC Building 9. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31168 ( 150k or 803k )
Neil, wearing PLSS mockup No.26, at the MESA, with Buzz beyond him. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31169 ( 160k or 808k )
Neil at the MESA. Buzz is hidden behind Neil, being tended by technicians. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31170 ( 164k or 884k )
Buzz in the foreground. Note that his RCU does not have a camera bracket of front. In the background, Neil has placed the TV on it's tripod. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31171 ( 136k or 808k )
Neil has moved the TV to the end of the cable connecting to the spacecraft and off the simulated lunar surface. In the background, Buzz is working at the MESA. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31172 ( 160k or 872k )
Buzz is at the MESA holding the extendible staff for the Solar Wind Collector (SWC). Note that he has a lanyard and carabiner hanging down from beneath his RCU. Other photos show that this was to be used to secure the Hasselblad camera with Buzz had it. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31173 ( 156k or 896k )
Buzz with the SWC assembled. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31174 ( 152k or 892k )
Buzz with the SWC staff pushed into the surface. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31175 ( 148k or 796k )
On the Moon, Buzz will orient the SWC so that the collector surface faces the Sun. In this indoor setting, he's has pointing it roughly toward minus-Z. As can be seen in mission photo AS11-40-5872, the SWC that Buzz deployed on the Moon had the word 'Sun' printed on the bottom of the sunward side and 'Shade' on the back. This training unit is not marked. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31176 ( 160k or 812k )
Neil at the MESA with the rockbox open on its 'table'. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31177 ( 152k or 772k )
Neil collects the Bulk Sample with the large scoop. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31178 ( 96k or 0.6 Mb or 1.4 Mb )
Motion blurred photo of Neil with the S-Band antenna. The umbrella cover is on the right with the carry bar on top. The rib protector rings the far leg. The photographer may be from Aviation Week and Space Technology. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31179 ( 132k or 0.7 Mb or 1.5 Mb )
Neil practices alignment of the S-Band antenna. He appears to be turning the crank barrel with his right hand. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31180 ( 132k or 752k )
Neil and Buzz seem to have swapped RCUs. Neil is on the left, facing us. Buzz is on the right wearing the RCU mockup with an attached Hasselblad. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31181 ( 144k or 764k )
Neil (left) and Buzz at the ladder. Note that Neil isn't wearing a checklist and neither of them is wearing a watch. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31182 ( 144k or 780k )
Buzz near the S-Band antenna. Buzz has a checklist attached to the gauntlet of his right glove. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31183 ( 132k or 716k )
Neil (right) is working at the MESA. Buzz is in the background wearing the Hasselblad. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31184 ( 124k or 728k )
Neil (foreground) is pulling a rock box out of the MESA. Buzz is in the background. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31185 ( 160k or 828k )
Neil has opened the rock box and is removing wire mesh packing material. Photo S69-31205 (below) provides a better view of the mesh material. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31186 ( 160k or 840k )
Neil has attached a spring scale to the near corner of the MESA and has a weigh bag in his left hand. Buzz is in the background, perhaps discussing photographic tasks with the person to his left. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31187 ( 164k or 852k )
Neil has attached the weigh bag to the spring scale. Because earlier EVA activities took longer than planned, Neil never used the spring scale on the Moon. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31188 ( 152k or 796k )
Neil has collected a 'sample' with the large scoop and is pouring it into the weigh bag. The SWC is in the foreground on the left. Something is hanging at the end of a lanyard attached to the porch. Perhaps a second Hasselblad? 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31189 ( 156k or 804k )
Neil with the large scoop. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31190 ( 144k or 728k )
Neil appears to have collected another 'soil sample'. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31191 ( 136k or 744k )
Neil pours a 'sample' into the weigh bag. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31192 ( 148k or 788k )
Neil pours a 'sample' into the weigh bag. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31193 ( 168k or 852k )
Neil closes the rockbox. Buzz is in the background near the SWC. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31194 ( 144k or 828k )
Buzz is in the foreground, perhaps watching Neil latching the rockbox. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31195 ( 140k or 752k )
Neil is at the center of the image and Buzz is in the right foreground. The technician on the right is holding Buzz's comm cables, keeping them out of harm's way. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31196 ( 112k or 668k )
Neil (left center) and Buzz (right) during an EVA runthrough. At some point before 31197 was taken, Neil and Buzz swapped RCUs, giving Neil the camera. Throughout this sequence, the Zipper cover over Neil's groin has been partly open, allowing us to identify him in this photo in which the PLSS numbers are not visible and Neil's face is turned down and to his left enough that he is not clearly identifiable. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31197 ( 136k or 728k )
Buzz is preparing to open the Scientific Equipment (SEQ) Bay so he can remove the Passive Seismometer and the Lunar Ranging RetroReflector (LRRR or LR-Cubed) for deployment. He is holding a tape that is on the righthand side of the Bay. When he pulls on the tape, the protective doors will open. Diagrams on page 58 of Scott Sullivan's Virtual LM illustrate the way the door is hinged. Additonal details can be found on pages 38 to 47. Two light-colored pads have been placed on the floor below the Bay to protect the training units when Buzz puts them down after pulling them out of the Bay. Note that Buzz no longer has the Hasselblad. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31198 ( 140k or 752k )
Buzz is opening the SEQ Bay doors by pulling the tape with his right hand and guiding the return with his left. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31199 ( 148k or 752k )
Buzz (left) and Neil have moved back onto the simulated lunar surface. Buzz has the seismometer and Neil the LRRR. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31200 ( 144k or 760k )
Neil is in the foreground deploying the LRRR. Buzz is in the background, undoubtedly working with the seismometer. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31201 ( 148k or 776k )
Neil is in the foreground deploying the LRRR. Buzz is behind him deploying the seismometer. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31202 ( 152k or 796k )
Neil is in the foreground deploying the LRRR. Buzz is behind him deploying the seismometer. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31203 ( 156k or 800k )
Neil is in the foreground deploying the LRRR. In the background, Buzz has the seismometer's solar panels deployed. 15 or 18 April 1969 A labelled drawing of the PSEP includes dimenions provided by Allan Needell of the National Air and Space Museum.Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31204 ( 168k or 844k )
Neil (right) and Buzz have completed deploying the experiments. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31205 ( 136k or 756k )
Buzz (right) works with the rockbox while Neil watches. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31206 ( 144k or 768k )
Buzz has removed a core stem from the rockbox and has attached it to an extension handle. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31207 ( 156k or 836k )
Buzz leans to his left, apparently to get something out of the large bag hanging from the far side of the MESA. On the Moon, he would not be able to lean that far to the side without holding on the the spacecraft and or sticking his left leg far out toward the photographer and bending is right knee. Note the spare Hasselblad hanging at Neil's right by a lanyard from the porch. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31208 ( 148k or 780k )
Buzz (right) and Neil at the MESA. Buzz is holding a core tube attached to an extension handle. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31209 ( 144k or 776k )
Neil (left) and Buzz at the MESA. Buzz is holding a weigh bag. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31210 ( 148k or 784k )
Neil (left) and Buzz at the MESA. Buzz is holding a weigh bag. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31211 ( 136k or 768k )
Buzz pours a soil sample into the weigh bag. Note the tongs hanging from Buzz's waist. Neil is just out of frame to the right. The lens of his Hasselblad and his lower left leg are visible. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31212 ( 108k or 596k )
Neil at the MESA with a weigh bag sitting in the rockbox. Note that Neil has a checklist attached to the gauntlet of his left glove. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31213 ( 96k or 688k )
Informal training portrait of Mike Collins as he prepares for a centrifuge run. He may have a sensor taped to his chest. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31214 ( 92k or 672k )
MIke Collins prepares for a centrifuge run. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31215 ( 88k or 640k )
MIke Collins prepares for a centrifuge run. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31216 ( 124k or 688k )
MIke Collins and a technician at the centrifuge. Mike Gentry, a JSC veteran, tells us that the centrifuge "at that time was configured like the interior of the Apollo CM, with three couches and almost the 'whole ball of wax.'" Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
69-H-666 ( 160k )
Neil Armstrong watches while Buzz Aldrin takes a photograph of the LM mockup that can be seen reflected in Buzz's faceplate. Note Buzz's strap-on cuff checklist. 15 or 18 April 1969 Photo filed 18 April 1969. The training session may have actually been on 15 April 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-667 ( 134k or 915k )
Neil Armstrong (right) holds open a small sample bag to receive the sample Buzz Aldrin has collected with the tongs. The large scoop is in the foreground attached to the extension handle. 15 or 18 April 1969 Photo filed 18 April 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-668 ( 116k or 391k )
Neil Armstrong taking a documentation photo of a sample Buzz Aldrin is about to collect with the large scoop. The gnomon at the right-hand side of the picture gives an indication of local vertical, provides scale, and has a color/grey scale on the vertical stick. No documented samples were actually collected during Apollo 11 because other activities took longer than planned. 15 or 18 April 1969 Photo filed 18 April 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-670 ( 255k or 1.3Mb )
This excellent training close-up of Neil shows his OPS actuator mounted on the side of the RCU, details of the camera as mounted on the front of the RCU, and details of the tabs at the top of the face plate used to lower the gold-coated UV visor and the side visors. 15 or 18 April 1969 Photo filed 18 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
69-H-675 ( 162k or 1075k )
Buzz (right) extracts the LRRR from the SEQ Bay. He previously removed the passive seismometer, which is on the floor to his left. Neil watches carefully from behind Buzz. During the mission, Neil took a pan from this location once Buzz had the doors open and had started to remove the package. Buzz had the option of either using the tapes or removing the packages manually. During the mission, he took them out manually. 15 or 18 April 1969 Photo filed 18 April 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-673 ( 182k or 1410k )
Buzz (left) appears to be getting the extension handle off the MESA, which was stowed at the upper right as shown in S69-31581. Neil is at the right and is wearing a PLSS with the number '26' stenciled on both sides. 15 or 18 April 1969 Photo filed 18 April 1969. The training session may have actually been on 15 April 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S69-31229 ( 96k or 608k )
Either Neil or Buzz is being fitted with an RCU mock-up equipped with a bracket to hold a Hasselblad. Photo 21233 (below) suggests this is Neil. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31230 ( 88k or 580k )
Close-up of Buzz showing his microphones. 15 or 18 April 1969 Research by J.L. Pickering. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31231 ( 104k or 576k )
Buzz prepares for EVA training. Note the strap-on checklist on the gauntlet of his left glove. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31232 ( 124k or 640k )
Buzz prepares for suited EVA training. He has an air circulation (or cooling?) unit hooked up to his purge valve connector. Note the strap-on checklist on the gauntlet of his left glove. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31233 ( 120k or 600k )
Neil prepares for EVA training. He is wearing an RCU mock-up with camera bracket. The partially open flap over the astronaut's groin indicates this is Neil. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31234 ( 132k or 684k )
Neil prepares for EVA training. Note the carabiner hanging down from beneath the RCU mock-up. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31235 ( 140k or 748k )
Neil standing in the ladder footpad at the start of an EVA runthrough. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31236 ( 128k or 696k )
Neil standing in the ladder footpad at the start of an EVA runthrough. Note that he has the end of the Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC hooked to the carabiner attached to the front of the suit. During Neil's ladder descent on the Moon, Buzz kept some tension on the LEC so that it would act as a safety tether. Once Neil demonstrated that he had no trouble getting down the ladder safely, the LEC was never again put to this use. See, also, training photo S69-32246. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31237 ( 152k or 756k )
Neil works at the MESA still hooked to the LEC. On the moon, he detached the LEC once he has taken a few steps near the ladder. Note that he is wearing a strapped-on pocket on his left thigh. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31238 ( 148k or 748k )
Neil's strap-on thigh pocket has fallen off. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31239 ( 148k or 744k )
Neil is holding the contingency sampler in his right hand. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31240 ( 140k or 768k )
Neil collects the contingency sample. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31241 ( 128k or 672k )
Neil collects the contingency sample. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31242 ( 132k or 760k )
Neil has released the sample bag from the handle and is holding the bag in his left hand. Note that his thigh pocket has been re-attached. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31243 ( 136k or 732k )
Neil has the S-Band antenna package in his left hand. 15 or 18 April 1969 Note that he now has a camera on his RCU bracket. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31244 ( 132k or 696k )
Neil with the S-Band antenna package. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31245 ( 112k or 676k )
Neil with the S-Band antenna package. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31246 ( 140k or 716k )
Neil is taking a panorama near the ladder. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31247 ( 152k or 780k )
Neil near the MESA. Notice that he does not have a camera on his RCU bracket. 15 or 18 April 1969 Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-31562 ( 235k or 534k )
Rock box stowed in the training MESA. Part of the second rock box can be seen stowed in a second slot above the first. At the top right are the tongs and the TV lens that will be used when the TV is moved away from the LM. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31563 ( 267k or 574k )
Wider view of the training MESA with only the two rock boxes and the narrower-field TV lens in position. The framework at the bottom is the erectable MESA table used to hold a rockbox in workable position. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31564 ( 244k or 523k )
MESA with extension handle stowed over round slots for PLSS LiOH canisters. Because Neil and Buzz were only going to do one EVA, replacement canisters weren't flown until Apollo 12. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31565 ( 278k or 585k )
MESA with extension handle and tongs stowed. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31566 ( 245k or 544k )
MESA with geology hammer stowed . Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31567 ( 228k or 559k )
MESA with scoop head and geology hammer. Note that both can be fit to the extension handle. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31568 ( 230k or 545k )
Gnomon stowed to the left of the scoop head. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31569 ( 251k or 579k )
TV tripod stowed over the gnomon and to the left of the scoop head. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31570 ( 195k or 432k )
Attachment details - just above the hammer head - of the TV support. The TV support puts it in proper position to show the bottom of the ladder. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31571 ( 194k or 469k )
TV support attachment details immediately left of tongs. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31572 ( 190k or 489k )
Upper surface of the TV support. This view is toward the ladder. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31573 ( 170k or 489k )
Back of the TV camera as mounted on the TV support. This view is toward the ladder. Removal of the pins frees the camera for removal from the MESA. One of the pins, not yet installed, can be seen on the near righthand edge of the camera platform. Scan by Kipp Teague.

Paul Coan, Manned Spaceflight Center Television Subsystem Manager who was responsible for the equipment used on the Apollo spacecraft, writes, "The camera was mounted on the MESA upside down because the top plate was the 'hard' part of the structure. It was placed at an angle so that the bottom of the ladder could be viewed when the MESA was fully deployed. (There was some concern about whether the MESA would deploy fully – but that was not a problem.) The top was painted with a special white paint to minimize solar absorption and to maximize radiation. In contrast, the bottom was highly reflective to minimize absorption of heat reflected from the lunar surface. The handle/camera interface was designed with two trunnions and two 'hooks' and a latching mechanism so that, as you rotated the handle to its operating position, the handle was latched to the camera. It also provided the suited astronaut the capability of unlatching the camera."

S69-31574 ( 178k or 522k )
Locking pin that was seen uninstalled in S69-31573 has been inserted in the proper hole. The lanyard is a safety precaution against loss of the pin . Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31575 ( 219k or 545k )
Front view of the TV camera as mounted on the MESA. The lens on the camera is the wide-angle lens used to show the ladder. Note that the camera is mounted upside down. Scan by Kipp Teague.

Paul Coan writes, "The handle of the TV was 'substantial'. It was designed with a sufficient diameter so that the spacesuit gloved astronaut could easily attach it to the camera, and so that it could carry the weight of the camera. The cable that ran through the handle carried both video and power.".

S69-31576 ( 233k or 617k )
The bag on the left is the Lunar Equipment Transfer Bag which, on Apollo 11 to 14, was stowed in the MESA. For Apollo 15 to 17, it was flown to the Moon in the cabin. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31577 ( 264k or 574k )
Wider view of the central part of the MESA. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31580 ( 245k or 584k )
MESA table strapped over ETB. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31581 ( 310k or 630k )
Full view of the MESA. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31582 ( 301k or 658k )
View of the lefthand side of the MESA. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31584 ( 218k or 624k )
View of the righthand side of the MESA. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31585 ( 299k or 469k )
View of the MESA from the foot of the ladder. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-32231 ( 134k or 693k )
Neil and Buzz (left) brief NASA managers before a training session described in the Crew Training Summary as a "Lunar Timeline Demo for Dr. (George) Mueller (NASA Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight from 1963 to 1969)." 22 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32232 ( 134k or 758k )
Buzz (left) watches Neil use the Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC) to move a box between the cabin and the surface. During the mission, Buzz was in the cabin during LEC operations. It seems likely that the 'CDR' sign on the back of Neil's PLSS was added for Mueller's benefit. In a photo of Neil, S69-31108, taken a week earlier on 15 April, he does not have a 'CDR' sign on the back of his PLSS. 22 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32233 ( 166k or 873k )
Buzz (left) gets into position to collect a sample during training while Neil prepares a sample bag. 22 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32234 ( 140k or 802k )
Neil (left) and Buzz during training in Houston. Note the OPS activator on the left side of Buzz's RCU mockup and the camera bracket on the front. Neil's pressure gauge and Omega watch can be seen on his right forearm. Buzz has a strap-on checklist on the gauntlet of his left glove. Journal Contributor Karl Dodenhoff notes that both Neil and Buzz are wearing protective covers on the front of the suit where we would normally see the various connection ports for oxygen and water. Photo is dated 23 April 1969 but was undoubtedly taken on 22 April 1969 during the "Lunar Timeline Demo for Dr. (George) Mueller". Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32235 ( 159k or 836k )
Buzz Aldrin (left) and Neil Armstrong prepare to collect a documented sample. Buzz has the gnomon in his right hand and the large scoop in his left. Neil is wearing the EVA Hasselblad and will take pre-sampling photos of the foreground rock once Buzz gets the gnomon in place. During the mission, Neil and Buzz ran out of time before they were able to collect any documented samples. 22 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32236 ( 145k or 628k )
Close-up of Neil's legs as he steps onto the simulated lunar surface during training. Good detail of the pocket attached to his left thigh with Velcro strips. 22 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32237 ( 165k or 775k )
Neil (right) and Buzz practice collecting documented samples. Neil appears to be adjusting either the f-stop or focal distance on his chest-mounted Hasselblad. 22 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32238 ( 140k or 663k )
Buzz practices with the large scoop. Note that he is wearing a saddle bag similar to the ones worn on the Moon by Pete Conrad and Al Bean during Apollo 12. The orange tint of the saddlebag suggests that, like the Apollo 12 examples, it was made of Teflon film. 22 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32239 ( 131k or 627k )
Neil appears to be taking a moment of rest during EVA training. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32240 ( 138k or 600k )
Neil may be taking a pan in this training photo. During the mission, Neil took a pan from near the ladder at 109:32:26. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-32241 ( 148k or 607k )
Buzz practices deployment of the Passive Seismometer. The LR-Cube, which Neil deployed during the mission, is behind Buzz. Research by Ed Hengeveld. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32242 ( 109k or 427k )
Neil holds a weigh bag during EVA training. The bag is made of Teflon film and has rectangular metal frames at top and bottom to give it shape. Research by Ed Hengeveld. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32243 ( 140k or 642k )
Buzz (left) pours a sample from the large scoop into a sample bag. On the Moon, the internal pressure of the suit would have prevented Neil from bending as much at the waist as he is seen doing here. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32244 ( 155k or 656k )
Buzz (left) is holding the big scoop. He also has a pair of tongs, which appear to be tethered at his waist by the yo-yo that was used on the Moon by later crews. Neil (right) takes a documentation photo. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32245 ( 164k or 681k )
Buzz (left) uses the tongs to collect a small rock. Neil (right) has a sample bag ready. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32246 ( 100k or 430k )
Neil on the footpad during training. Note that a carabiner on his torso tie-down strap is hooked to the LEC. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32247 ( 129k or 558k )
This training photo shows Buzz deploying the Solar Wind Collector (SWC). 22 April 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32248 ( 161k or 699k )
Neil uses the big scoop to pour a sample into a weigh bag attached to the edge of the MESA. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32249 ( 126k or 567k )
Buzz (left) uses the tongs to transfer a rock sample to a sample bag Neil is holding open. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32250 ( 150k or 603k )
Buzz has the seismometer in his right hand and the LRRR in his left. Note that there are two LM mock-ups in view, one on the right and one beyond Buzz. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-32251 ( 174k or 685k )
Buzz is beyond Neil with the EASEP packages. Neil is wearing the Hasselblad and, after deploying the laser reflector, will document the deployment. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
69-H-698 ( 136k or 401k )
Aldrin and Armstrong during the 22 April 1969 "Lunar Timeline Demo for Dr. Mueller" are collecting documented samples. The Apollo 11 gnomon is in front of Buzz, who is holding the large, box-head scoop. He also has a pair of tongs attached at his waist. Note that Neil has his left side-visor down. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-705 ( 169k or 1098k )
Buzz (left) collects a sample with the tongs while Neil prepares to take a documentation photo. Photo filed 22 April 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-708 ( 163k or 1299k )
Buzz (left) has dropped a rock sample in the small sample bag held by Neil. Note that Neil is wearing a PLSS numbered "29" and Buzz is wearing one numbered "27". Photo filed 22 April 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-710 ( 142k or 1410k )
Buzz (left) has grabbed a rock sample with the tongs while Neil has a small sample bag ready. Photo filed 22 April 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-33919 ( 177k or 711k )
Buzz (left) collects a sample with the large scoop. Neil is in position to take documentation photos. Research by J.L. Pickering. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-33920 ( 140k or 628k )
Neil (left) is holding the gnomon. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-33921 ( 139k or 651k )
Neil with the TV camera. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-33922 ( 128k or 664k )
Neil positions the TV camera during training. 22 April 1969. Scan courtesy Gloria Sanchez and Mike Gentry, NASA Johnson.
S69-33923 ( 136k or 317k )
Neil positions the TV camera during training. A detail shows his cuff checklist. Although the text is not legible, the length of various lines is, not surprisingly, different from the as-flown version. 22 April 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-33875 ( 104k or 654k )
Buzz holds a LM model during a press conference. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-33876 ( 86k or 560k )
Mike Collins during a press conference. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-33878 ( 82k or 540k )
Close-up of Neil. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-34881 ( 168k or 507k )
The Apollo 11 crew work with a Navy diver in a raft floating next to a Command Module mockup during a recovery exercise. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31740 ( 160k or 357k )
Armstrong, Collins, and Aldrin (left to right) posing for a crew portrait. May 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31741 ( 108k or 608k )
Portrait of Neil Armstrong. Scan by Kipp Teague.
JSC2002E01692 ( 105k or 733k )
Portrait of Neil Armstrong. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-31742 ( 102k )
Portrait of Mike Collins. NASA scan.
S69-31743 ( 105k )
Portrait of Buzz Aldrin. NASA scan.
S69-63724 ( 147k or 847k )
Portrait of Buzz Aldrin. Research by Ed Hengeveld.
Crew Portrait with Saturn V ( 84k or 761k )
Neil Armstrong (left), Mike Collins, and Buzz Aldrin pose in shirtsleeve with their Saturn V in the background. 20 May 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-34875 ( 42k )
Original artwork for the Apollo 11 patch. Scan by NASA Johnson.
S69-34882 ( 168k or 344k )
Aldrin, Armstrong, and Collins (left to right) during a recovery exercise. 24 May 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-34944 ( 127k )
Neil poses on the deck of 'Retriever'. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S69-34960 ( 151k )
Neil and Command Module mockup on the deck of 'Retriever'. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S69-35504 ( 122k or 731k )
Clockwise around the table from the near left, Mike Collins, Buzz Aldrin, Gene Cernan, Tom Stafford, Neil Armstrong, and John Young discuss the flight of Apollo 10, which Stafford, Young, and Cernan completed on 26 May 1969. 3 June 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-35507 ( 196k or 772k )
Mike Collins has the floor at the meeting between the Apollo 10 and 11 crews after Apollo 10. 3 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-35502 ( 204k or 876k )
Gene Cernan (left) and Buzz Aldrin at the meeting between the Apollo 10 and 11 crews after Apollo 10. 3 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
69-H-955 ( 164k or 401k )
Armstrong, Collins, and Aldrin (left to right) with Bill Schick, Apollo Test Conductor, on the launch pad at the Cape during a 'walk-through emergency egress test'. Photo filed 10 June 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-295 ( 204k )
Armstrong, Collins, and Aldrin (left to right) during a 'walk-through egress test'. 10 June 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-36910 ( 174k )
Neil Armstrong on the tarmac at Ellington AFB after a flight in the LLTV (right rear). Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-324 ( 175k )
Neil Armstrong (left) and Buzz Aldrin prepare for an EVA training session, watched by Deke Slayton (right). A technician is checking Neil's cuff pressure gauge. Note that the chair backs have been removed to accommodate the PLSSs. A technician is checking Neil's cuff pressure gauge. Note the pocket strapped high on Neil's left leg. This contains the contingency sampler. 18 June 1969. Research by Jay Hanks.
KSC-69P-503 ( 120k or 725k )
Neil Armstrong (at MESA?) and Buzz Aldrin during training at the Cape. The rock box and the TV mounting hardware are highlighted in a detail. 16 June 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague. See, also, training photo S69-31573.
69-H-989 ( 106k or 559k )
Neil Armstrong climbing out of the cockpit of a T-38, after arrival at Patrick Air Force Base. Photo filed 17 June 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-990 ( 112k or 575k )
Buzz Aldrin (left) and Mike Collins on arrival at Patrick Air Force Base in a T-38. Photo filed 17 June 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69P-509 ( 96k or 456k )
(Left to right) Mike Collins, Neil Armstrong, and Buzz Aldrin posing in front of a LM mock-up. 19 June 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-296 ( 236k or 388k )
Mike Collins, Neil Armstrong, and Buzz Aldrin (left to right) pose in front of a LM mock-up. 19 June 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-832 ( 133k or 994k )
Mike Collins (left), Neil Armstrong, and Buzz Aldrin pose in front of a LM mock-up. Photo filed 19 June 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-319 ( 233k or 373k )
This photo shows Neil in a LM simulator. The Interim Stowage Assembly ( ISA ) is on the left at Neil's back and the Environmental Control System (ECS) is at the right. 19 June 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-975 ( 182k or 952k )
Neil Armstrong having protective covers placed on flight shoes by suit technicians before leaving LM simulator after flight training session. Photo filed 19 June 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-976 ( 129k )
Mike Collins in simulator training. Photo filed 19 June 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-978 ( 173k or 1143k )
Mike Collins in simulator training. Photo filed 19 June 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-37994 ( 269k )
Pre-stowage photo of the flown Lunar Equipment Conveyor. Here, the LEC is positioned on the parts of the inner bag, which will be assembled with Velcro fastenings. 23 June 1969. Scan courtesy Gloria Sanchez and Mike Gentry, NASA Johnson.
S69-37995 ( 242k )
Shows the inner bag partially assembled. 23 June 1969. Scan courtesy Gloria Sanchez and Mike Gentry, NASA Johnson.
S69-37996 ( 257k )
Shows the inner bag fully assembled. 23 June 1969. Scan courtesy Gloria Sanchez and Mike Gentry, NASA Johnson.
S69-37997 ( 248k )
Shows the outer stowage bag containing what are believed to be two 'waist tethers', each with a carabiner at either end. Note that the outer bag, itself, is equipped with a short strap and carabiner. The purpose of the 'waist tethers' is not clear; but, during Apollo 11, one was attached to the spare Hasselblad that Buzz placed on the cabin floor just inside the hatch during the EVA. 23 June 1969. Scan courtesy Gloria Sanchez and Mike Gentry, NASA Johnson.
S69-37999 ( 253k )
Shows the outer bag with its own strap and carabiner tucked in and, stowed on edge at left and right, two extra carabiners. These are probably the carabiners that Neil and Buzz attached to their neckring tie-down straps. Buzz's can be seen in a detail from AS11-40-5873 and, more clearly, in a detail from training photo KSC69PC-362. 23 June 1969. Scan courtesy Gloria Sanchez and Mike Gentry, NASA Johnson.
S69-37998 ( 283k )
Shows the outer bag with the LEC carabiners and pulley added. The inner bag is out of frame to the left. 23 June 1969. Scan courtesy Gloria Sanchez and Mike Gentry, NASA Johnson.
S69-38000 ( 312k )
Shows the inner bag in place prior to closure of the outer bag. 23 June 1969. Scan courtesy Gloria Sanchez and Mike Gentry, NASA Johnson.
S69-38202 ( 138k or 929k )
Mike in a Command Module simulator. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38317 ( 148k or 744k )
Mike in a Command Module simulator with an assistant. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38318 ( 124k or 700k )
Mike in a Command Module simulator. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38319 ( 116k or 808k )
Mike in a Command Module simulator. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38320 ( 112k or 832k )
Mike in a Command Module simulator. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38321 ( 116k or 788k )
Mike in a Command Module simulator. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38322 ( 124k or 736k )
Mike in a Command Module simulator. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38323 ( 148k or 704k )
Mike in a Command Module simulator. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38324 ( 100k or 692k )
Mike in a Command Module simulator. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38459 ( 120k or 772k )
Neil with the TV camera. In the background, Buzz seems to be deploying the Solar Wind Collector (SWC). These pictures were taken at the Kennedy Space Center, probably on 18 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38460 ( 136k or 768k )
This may be Buzz shortly after he deployed the SWC. Note that 'Shade' is written near the bottom. If we were on the Moon, we would be looking toward the Sun. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38461 ( 160k or 880k )
Buzz is off-loading the seismometer. The Gold camera is in the foreground. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38462 ( 140k or 824k )
Neil (left) has removed the TV camera from the MESA and has put it on the tripod. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38463 ( 164k or 860k )
Neil (left) and Buzz during training at the Cape. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38464 ( 132k or 756k )
Neil use the LEC to bring a Hasselblad down from the cabin. There is probably a technician in the cabin as a stand-in for Buzz, who watches from the background. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38465 ( 140k or 812k )
Buzz collects a 'sample' with the tongs while Neil prepares to take a documentary photo. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38466 ( 176k or 808k )
Eagle. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38467 ( 204k or 876k )
Eagle. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38468 ( 184k or 800k )
Eagle. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38469 ( 224k or 936k )
Eagle. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38470 ( 188k or 864k )
Eagle. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38471 ( 196k or 840k )
Eagle. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38472 ( 138k or 929k )
Neil practices sample collection with the scoop. The Solar Wind Collector (SWC) has been 'deployed' in the box on the left. 25 June 1969. Research by J.L. Pickering. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38473 ( 148k or 908k )
Neil is on the left with the Gold Camera, while Buzz extracts the LRRR from the SEQ Bay. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38474 ( 108k or 756k )
Buzz is at the top of the ladder. The only reason he can make the climb with any ease in Earth gravity is that he is not wearing a backpack and his suit is not inflated. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38475 ( 136k or 848k )
Neil has the contingency sampler. Buzz is in the background. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38476 ( 128k or 852k )
Neil (foreground) practices photographing Buzz's ladder descent. Buzz is about to step off the footpad. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38477 ( 140k or 880k )
Neil is removing the contingency sample bag from the sampler handle. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38478 ( 140k or 792k )
Neil (left) and Buzz during training at the Cape. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38479 ( 152k or 932k )
Neil (left) and Buzz prepare for EVA training at the Cape. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38480 ( 128k or 840k )
Buzz (left) extends the tongs, so Neil can remove the sample and put it in Buzz's hip-mounted saddle bag. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38481 ( 140k or 852k )
Buzz (foreground) uses the tongs to collect a sample near the LM, which he will put in the Gas Analysis Sample Container he has in his left hand. Neil is at the MESA. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38482 ( 124k or 776k )
Buzz (left) with the large scoop. Collecting a small rock like this on the Moon (along with a little soil) would be much easier on the Moon than on this hard floor. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38483 ( 136k or 796k )
Neil (left) and Buzz during indoor training at the Cape. Neil is taken a photograph. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38484 ( 140k or 800k )
Neil (left) and Buzz at the MESA. Buzz appears to be capping a core tube. He is wearing a weigh bag on his left hip, with a pack of individual sample bags attached to the lip of the weigh bag. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38485 ( 172k or 928k )
Neil (left) and Buzz during indoor training at the Cape. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38486 ( 124k or 760k )
Neil uses the LEC to transfer a rockbox up to the cabin. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38487 ( 144k or 784k )
Buzz (center) has just opened the SEQ Bay doors. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38488 ( 132k or 708k )
This suspension device was used to reduce the apparent weight of a flight PLSS so that crew could check EMU fit and function. The following series of pictures was taking on 25 June 1969 during the 'EMU CCFF' session listed in the Apollo 11 Crew Training Summaries for that date. Jack Schmitt remembers that CCFF was "Crew Compartment Fit and Function" The suits, PLSS and other gear seen in these pictures are evidently the flight units. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38489 ( 160k or 904k )
Neil practices putting a Hasselblad on the RCU mount. Buzz helps him see what he's doing by raising his visor. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38490 ( 120k or 648k )
Neil during the EMU CCFF at the Cape. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38491 ( 152k or 752k )
Neil in the suspension device shown in S69-38488. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38492 ( 180k or 812k )
Neil secures Buzz's LEVA neck covering. The photographs in this series are evidently not in chronological order. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38493 ( 140k or 720k )
Neil practices recharging the water reservoir in a PLSS. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38494 ( 164k or 828k )
Buzz (foreground) is either donning or doffing his PLSS, which is secured in the suspension device. On the back of Neil's suit, we see the patch of Chromel-R fabric that protects the suit from abrasion due to PLSS motions. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38495 ( 192k or 1059k )
Neil seated during the EMU CCFF session. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38496 ( 144k or 780k )
Buzz's flight RCU on a table with his OPS and lunar boots. This photo shows the OPS antenna secured under a fabric loop and also held done by the tip of a triangular flap secured with a snap. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38497 ( 144k or 728k )
Neil in the suspension device during the EMU CCFF session. His thigh pocket is being fitted. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38498 ( 124k or 640k )
Neil appears to be either opening or closing the pocket on his upper left arm. Ken Mattingly is in the background, wearing a dark-brown shirt. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38499 ( 156k or 752k )
Neil Armstrong (right) works on Buzz's suit hose connections during the EMU CCFF session. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38500 ( 176k or 992k )
Buzz is wearing his left EVA glove and is holding one of Neil's hoses out of the way with his right hand while he examines/works on Neil's suspended PLSS. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38501 ( 144k or 668k )
A suited subject, probably Neil, in the suspension device. Note the disconnected hoses. Someone is a blue coverall - probably Buzz - is working on the front of the suit. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38502 ( 164k or 876k )
Buzz attaches his RCU to the front of his suit. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38503 ( 152k or 702k )
Buzz helps Neil don a glove. Deke Slayton is on the far left, hands on hips. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38504 ( 148k or 824k )
Neil during the EMU CCFF session. The group of techs in the background appear to be securing Neil's PLSS in the suspension device. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38505 ( 152k or 788k )
Neil gets help donning his LEVA. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38506 ( 184k or 948k )
Neil practices taking pictures. Note that, although the camera is attached to the RCU bracket, he has it attached with a carabiner to the lanyard hanging on the front of his suit. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38507 ( 176k or 944k )
Buzz is wearing an EVA glove and is working on Neil's PLSS, with Neil in the suspension device. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38508 ( 148k or 748k )
Buzz works with his Hasselblad while in the suspension device. Deke Slayton watches from the left. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38509 ( 140k or 668k )
Neil sits while some techs continue to configure the PLSS and suspension device. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38510 ( 200k or 1251k )
Neil is in the suspension device while he and some technicians work on his suit, possibly adjusting the thigh pocket. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38511 ( 156k or 840k )
Neil opens the pocket on his left thigh while in the suspension device. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38512 ( 184k or 980k )
Neil reaches for the cooling and oxygen controls on the right front of the bottom of his PLSS. Buzz takes a close look from below. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38513 ( 172k or 920k )
Neil leans forward, hands on his knees while Buzz examines his OPS. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38514 ( 124k or 628k )
Neil, seated, attaches his RCU while Buzz works on the righthand side of Neil's PLSS. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38515 ( 172k or 924k )
One of the astronauts reaches for his cooling and oxygen controls on the right front corner on the bottom of the PLSS. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38516 ( 164k or 728k )
One of the astronauts is about to take hold of his Hasselblad and attach the carabiner to the bottom of the handle. 25 June 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38517 ( 160k or 840k )
The fit of Buzz Aldrin Portable Life Support System (PLSS) is checked with the help of a suspension system. 25 June 1969. Research by Ed Hengeveld. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38677 ( 188k or 804k )
Neil in a LM simulator. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38678 ( 188k or 804k )
Neil in a LM simulator. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
LLRF Rear View ( 153k )
Photo from behind of the LLRF vehicle approaching touchdown. Note that the 'craters' are painted on the flat tarmac. This frame comes from a set of clips provided by Mark Gray on his Apollo 11 DVD set and is used with permission. One clip indicates a date of 28 June 1969. Other clips show either Neil or Buzz walking out to the vehicle. After checking his log book for the time, Neil reported in 2003 "I flew from Patrick AFB (Cape) to Langley AFB in a T-38 on June 30, 1969 and returned on July 1. My log suggests that I was alone." The evidence, therefore, suggests that Neil and Buzz used the LLRF on different days. Late June 1969. Frame capture by Ken Glover.
LLRF Side View ( 154k )
Photo from behind of the LLRF vehicle approaching touchdown. Note that the 'craters' are painted on the flat tarmac. This frame comes from a set of clips provided by Mark Gray on his Apollo 11 DVD set and is used with permission. Late June 1969. Frame capture by Ken Glover.
KSC-69PC-362 ( 168k)
Buzz Aldrin takes a picture with his chest-mounted Hasselblad camera during a KC-135 exercise. The aircraft is flown in repeated parabolic flight paths to provide about 30 seconds of one-sixth g on the downward leg of each parabola. A detail shows a carabiner fitted to his neckring tiedown and attached to the bottom of the camera handle. July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-347 ( 136k)
Neil Armstrong during suit-up prior to a Countdown Demonstration Test. 3 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
Armstrong-noID (146k)
Neil Armstrong during suit-up prior to a Countdown Demonstration Test. 3 July 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
Aldrin-noID (4 Mb or 0.3 Mb)
Suit technician Ron Woods helps Buzz during suit-up for a Countdown Demonstration Test. 3 July 1969. Image courtesy Ulli Lotzmann.
0690-69P-556 (2 Mb or 0.2 Mb)
Suit technician Ron Woods works on Buzz's left IVA glove during suit-up, possibly for a Countdown Demonstration Test on 3 July 1969. Image courtesy Ulli Lotzmann.
Aldrin-noID ( 74k)
Buzz Aldrin during suit-up prior to a Countdown Demonstration Test on 3 July 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
Collins-noID ( 121k)
Mike Collins during suit-up prior to a Countdown Demonstration Test on 3 July 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
0700-69P-558 (1.4 Mb or 0.2 Mb
Armstrong (leading), Collins, and Aldrin make their way to the transfer van, probably for a Countdown Demonstration Test on 3 July 1969. Immediately behind Aldrin are ILC suit techs Joe Schmidt (left) and Ron Woods (right) who will accompany the crew to the pad and help get them into the spacecraft. Image courtesy Ulli Lotzmann.
KSC-69PC-338 ( 0.9 Mb)
In the White Room, Guenter Wendt (wearing glasses at rear) and his team work with Mike Collins, (left rear), Buzz Aldrin (foreground), and Neil Armstrong (next to Wendt) during a Countdown Demonstration Test. ILC suit tech Ron Woods is helping Buzz. Because the crew are not wearing their helmets, this picture was probably taken as they were leaving the spacecraft. 3 July 1969. Scan courtesy Ulli Lotzmann.
69-H-1057 ( 160k)
Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins (left to right) in the transfer van returning from the pad with suit tech Joe Schmidt after a Countdown Demonstration Test. Note that, although the astronauts have removed their helmets, they are still using their Portable Oxygen Ventilators to provide air circulation and cooling. Note that the units attached to the suits have white hoses while the unit on the left has black hoses. Perhaps because each unit could only provide oxygen for a limited amount of time, at least two sets of units were used sequentially from the time that the crew started breathing pure oxygen in the suiting room until they were hooked up to spacecraft oxygen. Journal Contributor James Hill calls attention to the fact that, as can be seen in launch-day photo 69-H-1121, units with white hoses were in use as they boarded the transfer van for the trip to the pad and, as can be seen in launch-day photo KSC-69PC-399, by the time they were on the swing arm, they were using black-hose units. In a May 2007 exchange of e-mail, Apollo suit tech Troy Stewart indicated that the black hoses were probably the same as the white hoses except that the outer, thermal insulation had been removed. We do not currently know if there was a thermal reason for using two different units or if the units could provide oxygen for less than the hour that the crews typically used the POVs and the difference in the hoses was a means of keeping track of the units. Photo filed 3 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-38847 ( 115k or 500k )
Neil Armstrong (left), Buzz Aldrin, and Mike Collins answer questions in a pre-flight press conference. 5 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1090 ( 120k )
Buzz Aldrin arrives for work, holding the keys to his Corvette. Photo filed 10 July 1969. Scan by Frederick Artner.
S69-39269 ( 168k or 1272k)
Buzz Aldrin trains in the 1-6th-g aircraft. Note the hatch/porch mockup in the background used to practice egress and ingress. See Neil's comments about egress training following 109:17:29. 10 July 1969. On the front of Buzz's suit, note the comm cable connecting him to the tech at the right leaning against the bulkhead and wearing headphones and a microphone. Research by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-39270 ( 132k or 780k)
Buzz is on a short mock-up of the LM porch and ladder in the KC-135 aircraft, and is trying to handle a flying rock box attached to the porch rail with a lanyard. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-39274 ( 160k or 804k)
Neil (left) and Buzz in shirtsleeves in a LM simulator. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
69-H-1100 ( 163k or 996k)
Buzz giving thumbs up sign leaving helicopter he flew to simulate lunar module flight. Photo filed 10 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1089 ( 137k or 635k)
Neil Armstrong with astronaut Don L. Lind in KSC's Flight Crew Training Building. Note the pressure gauge on Neil's right wrist. Photo filed 10 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69P-590 ( 148k or 336k)
Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin work in shirtsleeves in the LM simulator at the Cape. 11 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1094 ( 177k or 1319k)
Buzz Aldrin (left), Mike Collins, and Neil Armstrong review flight plans. 11 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69P-579 ( 142k or 1008k)
The NASA caption to this picture reads: "Apollo-11 commander Neil A. Armstrong descends the ladder of the Lunar Module Training Vehicle during practice for his upcoming lunar landing mission."

In response to an August 2003 e-mail, Neil wrote, ":I really don't have the foggiest idea of what I was doing. I don't think it had anything to do with simulation. If I were simulating a mission phase, I would have the helmet on and suit pressurized. On the other hand, if it was only 5 days before flight, I would not be wearing the suit unless it was for a purpose." 11 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.

KSC-69P-578 ( 276k or 507k)
Neil Armstrong at the foot of the ladder on a LM mock-up during training. He seems to be inspecting the insulation on the strut and/or footpad. 11 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague. Note that, within a given sequence of KSC images, later images have lower numbers.
69-H-1104 ( 157k or 815k)
Neil approaching helicopter for practice session. Photo filed 12 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1106 ( 153k or 831k)
Mike Collins (left) and Deke Slayton, director of Flight Crew Operations, walking from T-38 aircraft at Patrick AFB. Photo filed 12 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1113 ( 152k)
Deke Slayton (on stool at left), Buzz Aldrin, Neil Armstrong, and Michael Collins during the last pre-flight press conference. Photo filed 13 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1116 ( 109k or 877k)
Buzz Aldrin (left), Neil Armstrong, and Michael Collins during the last pre-flight press conference. Photo filed 13 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-367 ( 112k)
Buzz Aldrin (left), Neil Armstrong, and Michael Collins during the last pre-flight press conference. 13 July 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
Stowed OPSs ( 222k)
The two Oxygen Purge Systems as stowed in the LM prior to launch. Note that Neil's name is written in red lettering while Buzz's is black. Scan by J.I. Pickering / Ulrich Lotzmann.
69-H-1114 ( 115k or 763k)
Neil Armstrong reviews flight plans. Photo filed 14 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1115 ( 85k or 559k)
Buzz Aldrin reviews maps of the area they will pass over after LM launch from the lunar surface. The map in his left hand has the landing ellipse at the bottom. Photo filed 14 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1120 ( 115k or 1172k)
Buzz Aldrin eating supper in crew quarters on the night before launch. 15 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1122 ( 115k or 1172k)
Buzz Aldrin (left) and Neil Armstrong at supper in crew quarters on the night before launch. 15 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-368 ( 144k)
Bill Anders, Armstrong, Collins, Aldrin, and Slayton (left to right) during the pre-launch breakfast. Deke is discussing a map which might show the location of recovery ships or of communications sites to be used during the early phases of the missions. 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1118 ( 133k or 864k)
Mike Collins (left), Neil Armstrong, Bill Anders, Buzz Aldrin, and Deke Slayton during the pre-launch breakfast. Photo filed 13 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-376 ( 116k)
Neil Armstrong and Deke Slayton in discussion while suit technician Troy Stewart works on the hoses for Neil portable cooling unit. 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-377 ( 136k or 365k)
Neil Armstrong and suit tech Troy Stewart during pre-flight suiting. 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1127 ( 96k or 731k)
Portrait of Mike Collins during suit-up for launch. Photo filed 16 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1129 ( 90k or 736k)
Suit Tech Joe Schmidt getting Mike Collins ready for launch. Photo filed 16 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1131 ( 110k or 788k)
Portrait of Buzz Aldrin during suit-up for launch. Photo filed 16 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-382 ( 196k )
Buzz Aldrin yawns during pre-flight suiting. 16 July 1969. Scan by KSC Archives.
0815C-69PC-382 ( 3 Mb or 0.3 Mb)
ILC Suit technician Ron Woods watches while Buzz dons his right IVA glove. 16 July 1969. Image courtesy Ulli Lotzmann.
KSC-69P-639 ( 149k )
Bill Anders shakes hands with Buzz and wishes him well as he and the others enter the elevator in the MSOB on launch day. Note Buzz's black IV glove. Note, also, the LM tether attachment on the Buzz's right hip, a clear indication that the astronaut is a LM crewman. Ken Glover notes that in KSC-69PC-377 ( 136k ), taken late in suit-up, we see a black strap running from ear-to-ear across the top of his Snoopy cap. That same black strap can be seen in KSC-69PC-399 ( 200k ), shows Neil walking across the swing arm with the black strap still in place. In contrast, suit-up photo 69-H-1131 ( 110k ) shows Buzz already in his helmet but with the strap hanging down over his right ear. The LM crewman in KSC-69P-639 does not have a black strap running across the top of his Snoopy cap. See, also, KSC-69PC-412 125k. 16 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1121 ( 113k or 745k )
Neil waves to well wishers on the way out to the transfer van. Mike Collins, Buzz Aldrin and Deke Slayton (dark shirt behind Aldrin to the left) follow Neil down the hallway. Note that they are carrying Portable Oxygen Ventilators with whites hoses. See the discussion in the caption to 69-H-1057. Photo filed 16 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-369 ( 128k )
Neil Armstrong (front), Mike Collins, and Buzz Aldrin leave for the launch pad. 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-412 ( 124k )
Neil Armstrong leads the crew from the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building to the transfer van. ILC suit techs Joe Schmidt (left) and Ron Woods (right), in white coveralls, follow immediately behind Aldrin. 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-399 ( 124k )
Neil Armstrong and Mike Collins cross the CM access walkway on swing arm No. 9. Note that they are now carrying Portable Oxygen Ventilators (POVs) with black hoses. Suit tech Joe Schmidt is behind Collins carrying at least one white-hosed POV. See the discussion in the caption to 69-H-1057. 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.

Vehicle Assembly, Transport, and Checkout on the Launch Pad

69-H-180 ( 178k or 988k )

The command and service modules for Apollo 11 are installed in the altitude chamber of the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building at KSC. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-134 ( 165k )
NASA Caption: "View of CDR's position in Apollo lunar module ascent stage (port side). Triangular-shaped window is at center, with instrument-panel glare shield between window and CDR's main flight panel. Extending down forward cabin wall is the (crewman) optical alignment sight (COAS). CDR's circuit breaker panel ( CB(11) ) is at left." Photo filed 28 January 1969. Scans by Frederic Artner.
69-H-135 ( 120k )
Eagle's main instrument panel photographed under dark conditions with panel illumination turned on. Photo filed 28 January 1969. Scans by Frederic Artner.
69-H-136 ( 176k )
NASA Caption: "Interior of Apollo lunar module ascent stage cabin area looking aft. Ascent engine housing is in lower foreground and docking hatch is at the top." Photo filed 28 January 1969. Scans by Frederic Artner.
69-H-365 ( 227k or 761k )
Apollo 11 S-IC first stage in the Vehicle Assembly Building transfer aisle. Photo filed 21 February 1969. Scans by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-69 ( 283k or 1273k )
A crane lifts the Saturn first stage. 21 February 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague / J.L. Pickering.
69-HC-307 ( 359k )
A crane lifts the S-IC stage in preparation for stacking on a mobile launcher within the VAB's High Bay 1. Photo filed 21 February 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69P-179 ( 151k )
Arrival of Apollo 11 Instrument Unit (IU) at KSC aboard Super Guppy. 6 March 1969. Scan by J.I. Pickering.
69-H-548 ( 143k or 974k )
Suit technician Joe Schmidt assists Apollo 11 backup lunar module pilot Fred W. Haise, Jr., left, and James A. Lovell, backup crew commander, into lunar module for manned altitude run. Photo filed 20 March 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-HC-339 ( 232k )
Workers prepare the S-IVB for mating of the Instrument Unit (pictured left), which houses guidance, control and other Saturn V systems. Photo filed 21 March 1969 Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-340 ( 185k )
The S-II second stage is moved into position for mating with the S-IC first stage. Photo filed 21 March 1969 Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-341 ( 261k )
This photo shows the S-IVB third stage being hoisted into position for mating with the second stage. Photo filed 21 March 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-342 ( 210k )
The S-IVB third stage is moved into position for mating. Photo filed 21 March 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-19644 ( 228k or 411k )
LM-5 Ascent stage. 4 April 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-32396 ( 140k )
LM-5. Harald Kucharek notes that Eagle still has a probe attached to the plus-Z footpad, as indicated in a detail. See the discussion at 102:45:40. Note, also, that the flag kit has not yet been attached to the ladder; that will not happen until launch day. See the discussion following 110:15:47. 4 April 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69P-0245 ( 187k )
LM-5 is prepared for placement in the Apollo 11 spacecraft adapter. 4 April 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S68-32370 ( 168k or 435k )
Apollo 11 CSM being moved from its work stand for mating. 11 April 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-371 ( 288k )
The Apollo 11 Command/Service Module (CSM-107) being readied for transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building. Photo filed 18 April 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-439 ( 275k )
This photo shows the Apollo 11 Command-and-Service Module being mated to the spacecraft adapter. Photo filed April 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-440 ( 224k or 1321k )
This photo shows the Apollo 11 Command-and-Service Module being mated to the spacecraft adapter. Photo filed 1 May 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-441 ( 279k )
The Apollo 11 spacecraft assembly is hoisted for mating to the launch vehicle. Photo filed 1 May 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-620 ( 279k )
Aerial view of Saturn V SA-506, the space vehicle for the first lunar landing mission, moving down the 3.5 mile crawler way to Launch Complex 39A. Photo filed 20 May 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-269C-3290 ( 137k )
Apollo 11 CM/Saturn V on rollout. 20 May 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-269C-3292 ( 176k )
Apollo 11 CM/Saturn V in the VAB. 20 May 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-269C-3293 ( 113k )
Overall view of AS-506 prior to rollout. 20 May 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-269C-3294 ( 164k )
Side view of Apollo 11 in VAB on the morning of rollout. 20 May 1969. Scan by J.I. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-236 ( 287k )
Apollo 11 Saturn V rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building. 20 May 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-237 ( 170k )
Apollo 11 Saturn V rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building. 20 May 1969. Scan by J.I. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-238 ( 223k or 917k )
Aerial view of the Apollo 11 Saturn V rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building. 20 May 1969. Research by J. L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-241 ( 192k or 394k )
View of the Apollo 11 rollout. Scan by Kipp Teague.
Apollo 11 Rollout ( 118k )
View of the Apollo 11 rollout. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-249 ( 295k )
View of the Apollo 11 rollout. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69P-371 ( 216k or 288k )
Photographers document the Apollo 11 Saturn V rollout. 20 May 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69P-407 ( 168k or 339k )
Another view of the Apollo 11 rollout. 20 May 1969. Scans by Kipp Teague.
69-H-905 ( 206k or 1029k )
Apollo 11 rollout. Photo filed 20 May 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-910 ( 222k or 460k )
The Apollo 11 Saturn V moves down the crawlerway toward the launch pad at one mile per hour. Photo filed 20 May 1969. Scans by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-616 ( 314k )
A view of the Apollo 11 Saturn V during transport past the Mobile Service Structure. Photo filed 20 May 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-234 ( 201k or 536k )
Apollo 11 Saturn V during transport. 20 May 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-617 ( 227k or 569k )
This photo is a ground-level view of the Apollo 11 Saturn V during transport. The vehicle is 363 feet (111 meters) tall. Photo filed 20 May 1969. Scans by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69P-0397 ( 198k )
This photo shows the Apollo 11 Saturn V as it nears the launch pad. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-622 ( 152k or 403k )
Apollo 11 Saturn V on the Crawler as it begins to go up the ramp to Pad 39-A. Photo filed 20 May 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
Climbing the Ramp ( 180k )
Apollo 11 Saturn V on the Crawler climbing the ramp to Pad 39-A. Scan by ????.
S69-35306 ( 152k or 988k )
Apollo 11 Saturn V near the end of rollout. 20 May 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1096 ( 237k or 689k )
This photo is an aerial view of the Apollo 11 Saturn V moving to the firing position on the pad at the Kennedy Space Center. Photo filed 20 May 1969. Scans by Kipp Teague.
S69-36310 ( 143k )
Apollo 11 CSM closeout. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-36311 ( 146k )
Apollo 11 CSM closeout. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-36312 ( 144k )
Apollo 11 CSM closeout. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-36313 ( 153k )
Apollo 11 CSM closeout. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-36314 ( 156k )
Apollo 11 CSM closeout. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-36315 ( 156k )
Apollo 11 CSM closeout. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-36316 ( 175k )
Apollo 11 CSM closeout. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-36317 ( 123k )
Apollo 11 CSM closeout. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-36318 ( 121k )
Apollo 11 CSM closeout. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-36319 ( 179k )
Apollo 11 CSM closeout. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-36320 ( 201k )
Apollo 11 CSM closeout. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-36321 ( 144k )
Apollo 11 CSM closeout. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-36322 ( 137k )
Apollo 11 CSM closeout. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-36323 ( 137k )
Apollo 11 CSM closeout. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-36324 ( 144k )
Apollo 11 CSM closeout. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-38860 ( 150k or 369k )
Apollo 11 Saturn V on the pad at the Kennedy Space Center. 1 July 1969. Scans by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-366 ( 144k )
The Apollo 11 Saturn V on Pad 39A. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-858 ( 101k )
The Apollo 11 Saturn V on Pad 39A in the evening after rollout. 20 May 1969. Scan by J.I. Pickering.
KSC-69P-204 ( 88k )
Spacecraft components in the Operations and Checkout Building. Scan by KSC Archives.
69-H-1050 ( 331k or 817k )
This photo shows the Apollo 11 Saturn V on the pad at the Kennedy Space Center with the Mobile Service Structure being moved into place. Photo filed 1 July 1969. Scans by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1055 ( 516k )
Apollo 11 Saturn V on the pad during the Countdown Demonstration Test. Photo filed 1 July 1969. Scans by Kipp Teague.
S69-38658 ( 201k or 1022k )
View of Apollo 11 from the tower, with the Mobile Service Structure opposite. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-38782 ( 85k )
Components of the Apollo 11 plaque prior to assembly and installation. July 1969. Scan by Frederic Artner.
S69-39193 ( 146k or 612k )
A technician holds the Apollo 11 plaque with the hinged cover open prior to installation on the LM ladder strut. July 1969. Research by Frederic Artner. See, also, the installed plaque and cover. Scan by Paul Fjeld.
69-HC-730 ( 114k )
Apollo 11 plaque, probably as installed on the LM prior to launch. July 1969. Scan by J.I. Pickering.
KSC-69P-566 ( 128k or 201k )
The floodlit Apollo 11 Saturn V on Pad 39-A during a Countdown Demonstration Test. 1 July 1969. Scans by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69P-596 ( 148k or 232k )
The floodlit Apollo 11 Saturn V on Pad 39-A during a Countdown Demonstration Test. 1 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69P-551 ( 125k or 858k )
Mobile Service Structure moves away from the Apollo 11 Saturn V on the pad. 2 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1081 ( 163k or 680k )
The Mobile Service Structure (MSS) moves down the pad 39A ramp, leaving the Saturn V alone during a Countdown Demonstration Test. Photo filed 11 July 1969. Scans by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-717 ( 379k or 684k )
High-angle view of the White Room and the Apollo 11 Command-and-Service Module. Photo filed 11 July 1969. Scans by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-718 ( 288k )
Personnel atop the 402-ft. Mobile Service Structure look back at the Apollo 11 spacecraft as the tower is moved away during a Countdown Demonstration Test. Photo filed 11 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-357 ( 80k or 159k )
The Apollo 11 Saturn V on the pad at night during a Countdown Demonstration Test on 11 July 1969. Scans by Kipp Teague.

Saturn V Launch

KSC-69PC-443 ( 132k or 443k )

The Apollo 11 Saturn V at the moment of ignition. 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-39525 ( 154k or 1650k )
Seconds after first-stage ignition for the launch of Apollo 11. 16 July 1969. Scans by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1111 ( 80k) or 657k )
Apollo 11 Saturn V liftoff. Photo filed 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-40640 ( 997k)
Apollo 11 Saturn V liftoff. 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-393 ( 141k or 316k)
Apollo 11 Saturn V liftoff. 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69P-597 ( 86k)
Apollo 11 Saturn V liftoff. 16 July 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-419 ( 167k or 281k)
The Apollo 11 S-IC stage passes a launch tower camera. 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69P-620 (4 Mb)
Apollo 11 Saturn V about to clear the tower. View from the LC-39 press site. Photo filed 16 July 1969. Scan courtesy J.L. Pickering.
S69-39526 ( 144k or 349k)
Apollo 11 Saturn V clear of the tower. 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1150 ( 101k or 731k)
Lt. Gen. Samuel C. Phillips at the Apollo 11 launch. Photo filed 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-773 ( 0.1 Mb)
Apollo 11 Saturn V just seconds after lift-off. Photo filed 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-39961 ( 174k or 333k)
Fisheye view from the launch tower of the Apollo 11 Saturn V, seconds after first-stage ignition. 16 July 1969. Scans by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-442 ( 184k or 974k)
Kipp describes this as an exceptionally beautiful image of the Apollo 11 lift-off. 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-755 (0.1 Mb)
Apollo 11 launch from inside the firing room at the Cape. Photo filed 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-387 (116k)
Apollo 11 Saturn V from the control room at the Kennedy Space Center after rising about ten times its own length. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-397 ( 148k or 407k )
Apollo 11 after pitchover. Note the condensation cloud that has formed in air expanding aft of the first-stage/second-stage transition. 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-413 ( 100k or 182k )
Apollo 11 as viewed from an Air Force EC-135N plane. Journal Contributor James Hill notes that the bottom of the first stage seems to be engulfed in the hot exhaust. Journal Contributor Paul Fjeld writes, "It's called 'plume recirculation.' Because the F-1 nozzles are underexpanded for that altitude, a very small bit of the escaping burn mass actually goes forward from the lip of the nozzle. Because there are neighbor nozzles doing the same thing there is even more pinging 'upwards.' Couple that with a suction behind the detached part of the supersonic shock wave forming on the side of the S1-C stage and you get that dirty fire creeping up the rocket. It was expected and protected against. You can see the same phenomenon on shuttle launches just before the solids kick off - it looks like the bottom of the External Tank is on fire!" 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-39957 (1.8 Mb)
Apollo 11 staging. Two minutes 43 seconds into the flight, the outer four of the first stage engines have shutdown and a set of explosive bolts have fired for separation of the first stage.. 16 July 1969. Scan courtesy J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69P-632 (136k)
Wernher von Braun. The binoculars and the gesture suggest that this was taken during a post-launch discussion at the Cape. 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69P-631 ( 224k or 480k )
Launch control team member Jerry Croley writes, "We were listening to Vice President Spiro Agnew, who gave us a pep talk about an hour after the launch. I was stationed at console BE-17 with call sign C2HU. This was the SII LH Propellant Tanking Computer System, the controller that kept the LH level at the correct Flight Mass specified for the mission. It simply monitored the level through a capacitance probe and added LH as the LH evaporated following the filling by the Propellants section and through pressurization, after which there was no boil off. Our section was an Elec section working alongside the Mechs who managed the tank farms and overall propellant handling. (In the photo), I am standing ( 128k on the edge of the A level in front of the A level consoles (the side away from the window). Unfortunately, I cannot recognize any of the people from row BE." Deke Slayton, in a dark shirt with no tie, is six from the right in the second row, and Alan Shepard is next but one to Slayton's right. Kipp Teague notes that the clocks on the wall show Local (time) 10:25, Projected Launch (time) 9:32, and Accumulated Hold 12:00 (meaning 'none'. "As evidenced by the clocks, the photo was taken 53 minutes after liftoff." 16 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.

Mission Support Photos

S69-39601 ( 114k or 301k )
CapCom Charlie Duke (left), backup Commander Jim Lovell (next right), and backup Lunar Module Pilot Fred Haise (next to Lovell) in the MOCR during the Apollo 11 landing. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-39590 ( 75k or 655k )
Dave Scott in the MOCR during Apollo 11. 20 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-3722 ( 380k )
Spacecraft dynamics during lunar touchdown - various graphs.
S69-38600 ( 168k )
This photo shows the Apollo 12 LM crew, Pete Conrad and Al Bean, and, behind them, their backups, Dave Scott (behind Al) and Jim Irwin, monitoring Apollo 11 activities after the landing.
Journal Contributors John Saxon and Colin Mackellar have provided a collection of 17 images taken off the monitor at NASA's Honeysuckle Creek Tracking Station near Canberra, Australia. Those images are of much higher quality than what was being seen in the Mission Operations Control Room in Houston or by the global television audience.

S69-39815 ( 114k or 559k )

Journal Contributors Brian Lawrence and Ken Glover note that this photo was taken in the MOCR at 110:09:25 while Neil and Buzz were deploying the U.S. Flag. Scan by Kipp Teague.
Neil in the LM Prior to Undocking ( 42k )
This image shows Neil wearing his pressure suit as he and Buzz prepare for undocking. Image courtesy Mark Gray and Andrew Chaikin.

Mission Photos by Magazine Number

Some images are currently available only as low-resolution scans provided by NASA Johnson in the mid-1990s. The individual scans have TARGA filenames. Markus Mehring has compiled cross-references between those filenames and the NASA photo ID designations customarily used. Other images are available as higher resolution scans from prints and, unless otherwise credited, were provided by Kipp Teague. Beginning in 2004, NASA began to provide scans from original film and, as they become available to the ALSJ, we are using them to replace all prior versions. The scans from original film were done at approximately 4000 by 4000 pixels and are presented at 300 dpi equivalent. They are labeled "OF300".

Magazine 36/N (Color) Frames 5291-5432

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Where noted, captions for Magazine 36/N have been adapted from the Apollo 11 Flight Journal, edited by W. David Woods, Ken MacTaggart and Frank O'Brien.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 0.7 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.


Magazine 36 was used in Earth orbit, during translunar coast and in lunar orbit.


AS11-36-5291 (OF300) ( 78k or 822k )
001:09:21 Neil Armstrong in the Command Module.
From the Apollo 11 Flight Journal: About now, Buzz turns to his left and takes a somewhat blurred color photo of Neil with the Hasselblad camera, AS11-36-5291. Then he turns towards Mike and photographs him also, AS11-36-5292. Mike is seen holding the TV camera which they have just been discussing.
AS11-36-5292 (OF300) ( 175k or 1.9 Mb )
001:09:21 Michael Collins in the Command Module.
From the Apollo 11 Flight Journal: About now, Buzz turns to his left and takes a somewhat blurred color photo of Neil with the Hasselblad camera, AS11-36-5291. Then he turns towards Mike and photographs him also, AS11-36-5292. Mike is seen holding the TV camera which they have just been discussing.
AS11-36-5293 (OF300) ( 87k or 869k )
001:25:10 View of Earth from orbit.
From the Apollo 11 Flight Journal: "About now, Collins takes photo number AS11-36-5293 of the cloud-speckled Earth, looking east towards the Sun. Having lost the camera 5 minutes earlier, he has missed a sunrise photo, but he captures the glaring sun in the sky above the ocean, rising rapidly as a result of their orbital motion. He takes a further 8 photos at this point, through to AS11-36-5301. AS11-36-5298 is the best one showing the low pressure cell."
AS11-36-5294 (OF300) ( 160k or 2.1 Mb )
001:25:10 View of Earth from orbit.

Journal Contributor Paul White has made detailed comparisons of cloud patterns seen in a large number of Apollo images with imagery taken at close to the same time by various meteorlogical satellites.

AS11-36-5295 (OF300) ( 158k or 1.2 Mb )
001:25:10 View of Earth from orbit.
AS11-36-5296 (OF300) ( 200k or 1.4 Mb )
001:25:10 View of Earth from orbit.
AS11-36-5297 (OF300) ( 161k or 1.3 Mb )
001:25:10 View of Earth from orbit.
AS11-36-5298 (OF300) ( 195k or 1.45 Mb )
001:25:10 View of Earth from orbit.
AS11-36-5299 (OF300) ( 133k or 1.17 Mb )
001:25:10 View of Earth from orbit.
AS11-36-5300 (OF300) ( 202k or 1.45 Mb )
001:25:10 View of Earth from orbit. Baja Penninsula, San Ignacio Lagoon, Bellenas Bay.
AS11-36-5301 (OF300) ( 162k or 1.2 Mb )
001:25:10 View of Earth from orbit. El Aguajito, Santa Ana, Gulf of California.
AS11-36-5302 (OF300) ( 166k or 1.18 Mb )
View of Earth from orbit. Mexico.
AS11-36-5303 (OF300) ( 161k or 1.19 Mb )
View of Earth from orbit. Mexico.
AS11-36-5304 (OF300) ( 158k or 1.18 Mb )
View of Earth from orbit. Mexico.
AS11-36-5305 (OF300) ( 228k or 1.45 Mb )
View of Earth from orbit. South America.
AS11-36-5306 (OF300) ( 259k or 1.7 Mb )
View of Earth from orbit. Baja Penninsula.
AS11-36-5307 (OF300) ( 173k or 1.18 Mb )
View of Earth from orbit. Baja Penninsula.
AS11-36-5308 (OF300) ( 257k or 1.7 Mb )
View of Earth from orbit. Baja Penninsula.
AS11-36-5309 (OF300) ( 147k or 1.1 Mb )
View of Earth from orbit.
AS11-36-5310 (OF300) ( 28k or 511k )
003:21:32 Transposition and docking.
From the Apollo 11 Flight Journal: "As the CSM approaches the LM, Buzz uses the Hasselblad camera to take seven shots. AS11-36-5310, 5311 and 5312 are relatively distant shots. A constellation of particles surround the spent stage. Frame 5313 is a well-framed shot of the top of the LM. 5314, 5315 and 5316 were taken at the final stages of the approach. On the last frame, the external orifice of the LMs optical system is visible top-right, while the overhead docking window is visible top-left."
AS11-36-5311 (OF300) ( 38k or 490k )
003:21:32 Transposition and docking.
AS11-36-5312 (OF300) ( 38k or 362k )
003:21:32 Transposition and docking.
AS11-36-5313 (OF300) ( 66k or 931k )
003:21:32 Transposition and docking.
AS11-36-5314 (OF300) ( 73k or 612k )
003:21:32 Transposition and docking.
AS11-36-5315 (OF300) ( 63k or 566k )
003:21:32 Transposition and docking.
AS11-36-5316 (OF300) ( 71k or 616k )
003:21:32 Transposition and docking.
AS11-36-5317 (OF300) ( 83k or 917k )
Earth view.
AS11-36-5318 (OF300) ( 45k or 463k )
Earth view.
AS11-36-5319 (OF300) ( 99k or 870k )
Earth view.
AS11-36-5320 (OF300) ( 89k or 826k )
Earth view.
AS11-36-5321 (OF300) ( 98k or 851k )
Earth view.
AS11-36-5322 (OF300) ( 92k or 883k )
Earth view.
AS11-36-5323 (OF300) ( 82k or 794k )
Earth view.
AS11-36-5324 (OF300) ( 91k or 858k )
Earth view.
AS11-36-5325 (OF300) ( 69k or 912k )
Earth view.
AS11-36-5326 (OF300) ( 81k or 892k )
Earth view.
AS11-36-5327 (OF300) ( 19k or 251k )
SIVB stage.
AS11-36-5328 (OF300) ( 16k or 182k )
SIVB stage.
AS11-36-5329 (OF300) ( 16k or 243k )
SIVB stage.
AS11-36-5330 (OF300) ( 29k or 698k )
Earth view.
AS11-36-5331 (OF300) ( 29k or 714k )
Earth view.
AS11-36-5332 (OF300) ( 25k or 240k )
Earth view.
AS11-36-5333 (OF300) ( 28k or 345k )
Earth view.
AS11-36-5334 (OF300) ( 98k or 793k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5335 (OF300) ( 90k or 712k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5336 (OF300) ( 93k or 662k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5337 (OF300) ( 101k or 885k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5338 (OF300) ( 96k or 664k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5339 (OF300) ( 100k or 770k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5340 (OF300) ( 101k or 819k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5341 (OF300) ( 83k or 660k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5342 (OF300) ( 81k or 663k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5343 (OF300) ( 81k or 779k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5344 (OF300) ( 83k or 645k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5345 (OF300) ( 84k or 657k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5346 (OF300) ( 79k or 564k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5347 (OF300) ( 78k or 602k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5348 (OF300) ( 81k or 728k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5349 (OF300) ( 70k or 588k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5350 (OF300) ( 69k or 560k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5351 (OF300) ( 69k or 547k )
Earth view. Long lens.
AS11-36-5352 (OF300) ( 38k or 643k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5353 (OF300) ( 37k or 452k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5354 (OF300) ( 42k or 892k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5355 (OF300) ( 39k or 611k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5356 (OF300) ( 34k or 418k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5357 (OF300) ( 34k or 504k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5358 (OF300) ( 34k or 616k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5359 (OF300) ( 34k or 547k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5360 (OF300) ( 34k or 457k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5361 (OF300) ( 36k or 731k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5362 (OF300) ( 33k or 641k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5363 (OF300) ( 85k or 785k )
Docking target on LM.
AS11-36-5364 (OF300) ( 75k or 702k )
Docking target on LM.
AS11-36-5365 (OF300) ( 88k or 736k )
Docking target on LM.
AS11-36-5366 (OF300) ( 33k or 619k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5367 (OF300) ( 33k or 582k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5368 (OF300) ( 33k or 656k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5369 (OF300) ( 43k or 744k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5370 (OF300) ( 31k or 390k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5371 (OF300) ( 31k or 369k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5372 (OF300) ( 29k or 279k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5373 (OF300) ( 31k or 461k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5374 (OF300) ( 31k or 616k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5375 (OF300) ( 40k or 826k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5376 (OF300) ( 25k or 377k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5377 (OF300) ( 28k or 884k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5378 (OF300) ( 24k or 511k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5379 (OF300) ( 25k or 569k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5380 (OF300) ( 24k or 365k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5381 (OF300) ( 24k or 251k )
Earth view
AS11-36-5382 (OF300) ( 126k or 911k )
About 055:30. The CM Probe and LM Drogue docking assemblies, documented in stowage aboard the CM after removal from the tunnel.
From the Technical Crew Debrief :
7.24 Removal of Probe and Drogue
Collins: We stowed the probe, as one of the previous flights suggested, under the right-hand couch with the nose of the probe in the plus-Y direction. It was strapped underneath the foot of the right-hand couch with two straps which were specifically designed to stow it. We just stuffed the drogue in between the LEB and the probe and held it in place with a couple of general-purpose straps. It seemed to work well.
Armstrong: I was thinking ahead about our overall LM stowage which was different from our preflight plan with respect to leaving the probe and drogue stowed in the command module overnight.
Aldrin: After LOI-2.
Armstrong: Subsequent to this time.
Aldrin: It seemed that all the pluses were in favor of doing that.
Armstrong: I agree; I really did not think it was a big thing. We did it to try and save time at the start of the DOI day. We had it removed and it was stowed. That meant that on one night, we had to arrange a sleep configuration with the probe and the drogue stowed in the command module.
Speaker: Who slept with this?
Aldrin: I did. It was a little cramped under the right seat with the probe and drogue, but I was able to sneak in underneath it. I think I made one exit over the hatch end of the seat. I guess the only thing that leaves you a little bit open to having the probe and the drogue in the command module is if you've gotten separated from the LM.
AS11-36-5383 (OF300) ( 121k or 921k )
Probe and Drogue assemblies stowed in CM.
AS11-36-5384 (OF300) ( 85k or 815k )
Probe and Drogue assemblies stowed in CM.
AS11-36-5385 (OF300) ( 84k or 868k )
About 055:41. Neil floats in the tunnel connecting the LM And CM, using the TV to document Buzz doing a LM inspection. This photo was, of course, taken by Mike Collins. With regard to the TV camera, Journal Contributor Markus Mehring writes, "What you're seeing here is an extra TV monitor attached to the cam with the ever-present gray tape. Early crews had no such monitor or other means of image control and complained about their inability to easily/properly point the camera inside the cramped quarters of their spacecraft, so this was what they were granted. The camera is the Westinghouse color model, essentially the same model that suffered the burnout on A12, only that this one is IVA-black while the A12 camera was EVA-white. Also note that the camera is actually held upside-down (that is, we're seeing its top side), to capture the CM interior in proper alignment for the TV audience." Karl Dodenhoff has provided a labeled version.
AS11-36-5386 (OF300) ( 74k or 785k )
Similar to 5385. Buzz's feet are visible on the floor of the LM, beyond the tunnel.
AS11-36-5387 (OF300) ( 97k or 770k )
The right couch of the CM. Utensils with blue velcro patches are tethered to a control panel.
AS11-36-5388 (OF300) ( 74k or 710k )
Neil Armstrong in the Lower Equipment Bay. Note the sextant/optical station with the eyepatch tethered to it, and the green display digits illuminated on the DSKY behind him.
AS11-36-5389 (OF300) ( 123k ) or 856k )
This photo, taken at about 055:41 during the initial LM inspection, on the day before lunar orbit insertion, shows the 16-mm Data Acquisition Camera (DAC) mounted in the LMP's window.
LM Inspection 'Mini-pan' (3.8 Mb)
Assembled by JonHancock from AS11-36-5389-93 plus 5396-99. Erik van Meijgaarden notes that Buzz seems to be inviting us into the LM, a lovely thought. See, also, an earlier version (137k) made from 5389-90 by Bob Farwell
AS11-36-5390 (OF300) ( 109k or 813k )
Neil took this picture of Buzz during their initial inspection of the LM at about 057:03. Journal Contributor David Sander notes that "Buzz is wearing his intravehicular suit, a specially made set of garments designed to be as flame retardant as the rest of the ship, and made from the same fabric as the outer layer of the spacesuits". Paolo Attivissimo notes that Buzz's watch reads 5:35 (Houston time), which is 57:03 GET (Ground Elapsed Time)
AS11-36-5391 (OF300) ( 112k or 814k )
Buzz in the LM.
AS11-36-5392 (OF300) ( 115k ) or 829k )
View of the LMP's station during the initial LM inspection.
AS11-36-5393 (OF300) ( 65k or 703k )
Buzz in the LM. Out of focus.
AS11-36-5394 (OF300) ( 73k or 902k )
View of the CM exterior, hatch side, from through the LM Rendezvous Window.
AS11-36-5395 (OF300) ( 51k or 759k )
Another view through the LM Rendezvous Window, showing a small portion of the CM, a portion of the Rendezvous Radar Antenna, and inside, a strap securing the ISA.
AS11-36-5396 (OF300) ( 102k or 796k )
Buzz in the LM. The ISA is visible behind him. Out of focus.
AS11-36-5397 (OF300) ( 97k or 772k )
Buzz in the LM, holding a Temporary Stowage Bag or "McDivitt Purse". Out of focus.
AS11-36-5398 (OF300) ( 115k or 844k )
Buzz in the LM.
AS11-36-5399 (OF300) ( 116k or 880k )
Taken 'upside down', this shows Buzz's hands and the lower portion of the ISA, still in its Earth launch stowage configuration. Also visible are the LM Front Hatch, the LMP PLSS and two Helmet Bags.
AS11-36-5400 (OF300) ( 19k or 316k )
Earth view. Partially out of frame.
AS11-36-5401 (OF300) ( 23k or 284k )
Earth view.
AS11-36-5402 (OF300) ( 22k or 315k )
Earth view.
AS11-36-5403 (OF300) ( 59k or 556k )
View of the LM and Earth during translunar coast.
AS11-36-5404 (OF300) ( 64k or 575k )
View of the LM and Earth during translunar coast.
AS11-36-5405 (OF300) ( 95k or 1.04 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 13/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "North of crater 292"
AS11-36-5406 (OF300) ( 115k or 1.08 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 13/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "In crater IX"
AS11-36-5407 (OF300) ( 85k or 994k )
Moon view. From p. 13/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; NE of crater IX"
AS11-36-5408 (OF300) ( 117k or 1.05 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 13/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "North of crater 292"
AS11-36-5409 (OF300) ( 105k or 1.05 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 13/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "crater IX, TO 34"
AS11-36-5410 (OF300) ( 96k or 1.05 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 13/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "South of crater 216"
AS11-36-5411 (OF300) ( 113k or 1.02 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 14/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "crater IX"
AS11-36-5412 (OF300) ( 83k or 1.00 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 14/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "East of crater 282"
AS11-36-5413 (OF300) ( 80k or 791k )
Moon view. From p. 14/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Crater IX, TO 30 & 34"
AS11-36-5414 (OF300) ( 77k or 712k )
Moon view. From p. 14/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Crater IX, TO 30 & 34"
AS11-36-5415 (OF300) ( 56k or 828k )
Moon view. From p. 14/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "High oblique in vicinity of crater IX, not plotted"
AS11-36-5416 (OF300) ( 81k or 757k )
Moon view. From p. 14/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Craters 216, 217 & IX, TO 30 & 34"
AS11-36-5417 (OF300) ( 69k or 698k )
Moon view. From p. 14/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Craters 216, 217 & IX, TO 30 & 34"
AS11-36-5418 (OF300) ( 73k or 675k )
Moon view. From p. 14/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Craters 216, 217 & IX, TO 30 & 34"
AS11-36-5419 (OF300) ( 90k or 1.07 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 14/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Crater 211, TO 46"
AS11-36-5420 (OF300) ( 99k or 1.10 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 14/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Crater 211, TO 46"
AS11-36-5421 (OF300) ( 115k or 1.09 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 14/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Crater 211, 212 and 213, TO 46"
AS11-36-5422 (OF300) ( 117k or 1.09 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 14/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Crater 211, 212 and 213, TO 46"
AS11-36-5423 (OF300) ( 113k or 1.07 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 14/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Crater 204"
AS11-36-5424 (OF300) ( 112k or 1.07 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 14/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Crater 207"
AS11-36-5425 (OF300) ( 81k or 958k )
Moon view. From p. 14/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Crater 205, TO 50"
AS11-36-5426 (OF300) ( 115k or 1.06 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 15/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Part of crater 275"
AS11-36-5427 (OF300) ( 58k or 629k )
Moon view. From p. 15/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Looking into crater 220"
AS11-36-5428 (OF300) ( 112k or 1.02 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 15/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Looking into crater 220"
AS11-36-5429 (OF300) ( 51k or 1.29 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 15/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Too dark to locate"
AS11-36-5430 (OF300) ( 105k or 971k )
Moon view. From p. 15/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Crater IX, TO 30"
AS11-36-5431 (OF300) ( 104k or 1.04 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 15/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "South of crater 216"
AS11-36-5432 (OF300) ( 98k or 1.09 Mb )
Moon view. From p. 15/115 of the Apollo 11 Photo Index; "Crater 216"


Magazine 37/R (Color) Frames 5433-5555

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 0.7 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.


Magazine 37/R was used in the LM in lunar orbit prior to the landing and then on the lunar surface for photography out the LM windows. During LM activation in lunar orbit at 81:55:43, Buzz put this magazine on the "reserve camera". This is the IVA camera; it doesn't have a reseau plate. He also loaded the other color magazine (40/S) on the EVA ("surface") camera. He then took a few images with each camera to make sure that at least one of the magazines would work and could be taken outside on the EVA.

All the frames on this magazine were taken with the magazine on the IVA camera. Therefore, none of the frames show reseau crosses.

Thierry Bisiaux and Markus Mehring wrote many of the captions. A question from AwE130 related to use of the three LM magazines (37, 39, and 40) on the two cameras at various times led to a re-assessment of the photographs and the on-board audio recordings, up to the time that Neil and Buzz finished the pre-EVA window photography. Captions for 5433-5439 have been revised.


Calibration Chart (OF300) ( 81k )

AS11-37-5433 (OF300) ( 85k or 867k )
Taken at approximately 082:15:10, about 15 minutes before Rev 4 Earthrise/AOS. High oblique view centered on Crater Schuster at latitude 4.0N longitude 146.0E
AS11-37-5434 (OF300) ( 54k or 930k )
Taken at about 082:32:07. Earthrise from lunar orbit. The photo was taken out the CDR's window. The RCS plume deflector is partily visible on the left. Paul Fjeld writes "Buzz had to mash the camera right against the top of the window to grab the earth."
AS11-37-5435 (OF300) ( 19k or 397k )
Earth from lunar orbit. Based on comparisons with cloud patterns known from Weather satelite images, Paul While estimates that 5435 was taken about an hour after 5434.
AS11-37-5436 (OF300) ( 31k or 592k )
Lunar horizon from orbit as seen through Neil's window. In an enhanced detail, the large, raised-rim crater on the right in the middle distance is Babcock.
AS11-37-5437 (OF300) ( 107k or 808k )
82:56:25 Approaching Apollo Landing Site 2 in the southwestern Sea of Tranquility. Taken by Buzz out the CDR window, with the RCS quad in the lower left corner. When this picture was taken, Neil and Buzz were in the midst of LM Activation. Markus Mehring has produced a richly-labeled version ( 0.3 Mb ). See, also, Figure 1-20a ( 0.8 Mb or 0.1 Mb ) in the Apollo 11 Preliminary Science Report. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.

Landing Site 2 is located just right of center at the very edge of the terminator. Crater Maskelyne is the large one at the lower right, with Maskelyne B directly beyond. Hypatia Rille (U.S. Highway Number One) is at upper left, with the crater Moltke just to the right (north) of it. Sidewinder Rille and Diamondback Rille extend from left to right across the center of the picture. Maskelyne and Maskelyne B have a diameter of almost 24 and 9 km respectively, and the distance from the crater center of Maskelyne to the Apollo 11 landing site is about 210 km. While Moltke is a relatively small crater, with a diameter of merely 6.5 km, its very light ejecta blanket makes it easy to find for Earth-based observers with moderately sized telescopes, making it a popular landmark for locating Station Tranquillitatis. Research by Danny Caes. Compare with a Starry Night view ( 0.2Mb ) of the area at the same time 5437 was taken.

When I wrote a version of this caption sometime between 2 October 2008 and 27 April 2009, I thought this image was taken at about 94:50:00, when Buzz told Houston, ":Aldrin: Houston, Apollo 11. We just had a very good view of the landing site. We can pick out most all of the features we've identified previously.":. I didn't start using JPL Horizons until September 2009 and, until July 2012, hadn't checked the solar elevation at Tranquility Base at 94:50:00. It was 6.6 degrees, much too high to have put the terminator in its 5437 location. During my re-evaluation of this sequence of photos, I looked through the on-board transcripts recently added to the Apollo 11 Flight Journal for Day 4, including time Neil and Buzz spent in Eagle. At 82:56:25, Buzz tells Neil and Mike, "I think I can see it, for sure. Yes, I got it beautiful - I can - I got the whole landing site here." At this time, the solar elevation at Tranquility is only 0.6 degrees, which would put the terminator about 0.6 degrees of longitude west of the landing site. In the labeled version of 5437we see that the terminator is at about the location of Crater Sabine C which is, indeed, 0.6 degrees west of Tranquility Base.

AS11-37-5438 (OF300) ( 128k or 1714k )
Oblique view a bit east of north as they cross the terminator on Rev 4. It was taken out the LMP window with the RCS plume deflector at the center. Journal Contributor Markus Mehring notes that the "the huge roundish feature dominating the lower left half is Lamont (crater) with its plentiful bulky ridges". Markus recommends rotating the image about 60 degrees right to put north at the top for comparison with such maps as Plate 35 in Rükl's Atlas of the Moon. In that view, Jansen B is in the upper corner, with Jansen G just below it. Lamont is centered at about 5.0 N 23.2 E and, in Rükl's words is "visible under low-Sun illumination only". Lamont is about 130 km north of Tranquility Base.

At 082:58:34, about two minutes after taking 5437, Buzz say in the on-board, "I missed taking a picture of it, [garble]", which could mean that he realized he didn't have a vertical view of the landing site. In two minutes, they moved westward by about 6 degrees of longitude.

AS11-37-5439 (OF300) ( 47k or 574k )
86:28:48 Rev 6 Earthrise beyond the RCS quad to the left of the CDR window. The spacecraft are in the sleep mode and the crew will start the rest period at about 086:32:51.

Journal Contributor Paul White has made detailed comparisons of cloud patterns seen in a large number of Apollo images with imagery taken at close to the same time by various meteorological satellites.

AS11-37-5440 (OF300) ( 48k or 668k )
Rev 6 Earthrise sequence.
AS11-37-5441 (OF300) ( 53k or 662k )
Rev 6 Earthrise sequence.
AS11-37-5442 (OF300) ( 38k or 420k )
Rev 6 Earthrise sequence, but darker.
AS11-37-5443 (OF300) ( 89k or 908k )
Post-undocking view of the CSM during the separation sequence, with the eastern part of the Sea of Fertility (Mare Fecunditatis) about 195 km below. North is to the right. The two spacecraft undocked at about 100:12:03.
AS11-37-5444 (OF300) ( 83k or 880k )
CSM separation sequence.
AS11-37-5445 (OF300) ( 92k or 877k )
Command Module Columbia over Craters Taruntius K, Taruntius P, and Dorsum Cayeux in north central Mare Fecunditatis (Sea of Fertility). The coordinates of the center of the picture are 51 degrees east longitude and 1 degree north latitude. About half of the crater Taruntius G is visible in the upper left corner of the picture. Research by Danny Caes. Markus Mehring notes that the two craters partly visible at the top are Anvil and Taruntius H.
AS11-37-5446 (OF300) ( 126k or 1104k )
CSM separation sequence.
AS11-37-5447 (OF300) ( 195k or 1559k )
Command Module over western Sea of Tranquility. Crater Moltke is at the upper left. North is to the right. This view also includes the Apollo 11 landing site, which is just above and to the left of Columbia. Research by Danny Caes. As indicated in a labeled version by Markus Mehring, the Apollo 11 landing site is at the center of the photo, NNW of the CSM and ESE of the Cat's Paw landmark. The sharp-rimmed crater at the lower left edge is Moltke. Hypatia Rille (also known as U.S. 1) extends through the top left corner of the image. The crater directly to the right of the CSM has been named Collins following the Apollo 11 mission. The crater Aldrin is in the top right corner of this image. The third crater named in honor of the Apollo 11 crew, Armstrong, would be to the lower right of this photo and cannot be seen here. During the Apollo 11 mission, the craters Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins were still referred to as Sabine E, D and B respectively, with Sabine C being the crater that forms a triangle with B and D in this photo. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS11-37-5448 (OF300) ( 238k or 1708k )
CSM separation sequence. The CSM can be seen near the center of the image, with the sharp-rimmed crater Schmidt directly right of it. The crater part in the lower right corner is the western part of Sabine, and the partially visible rim at the right edge of the image belongs to Ritter. This is the last photo taken from the LM prior to the powered descent, and eventually the landing one orbit later.


The next five frames (5449-5453) were taken out Neil's window just after they completed the post-landing platform alignment, as per Sur-5 in the LM Lunar Surface Checklist, at about 103:59:47. These pictures - together with a sequence that follows, taken by Buzz - form a contingency panorama in order to briefly document the site and its immediately interesting features, so that the crew wouldn't have left with empty hands in case of a No Stay decision. Note that, as with all the frames on this magazine, they were taken with the magazine on the IVA camera and have no reseau crosses.


AS11-37-5449 (OF300) ( 117k or 897k )

View of lunar surface just after landing with a thruster on the foreground, seen towards the left/South through Neil's window.
AS11-37-5450 (OF300) ( 117k or 967k )
View of lunar surface just after landing, right of AS11-37-5449.
AS11-37-5451 (OF300) ( 48k or 593k )
Down-Sun (west) view of lunar surface just after landing with the LM shadow, lunar horizon and a partial view of a shallow crater to the left of the LM shadow.
AS11-37-5452 (OF300) ( 239k or 1761k )
Good view of the eastern portion of the double crater under Neil's window.
AS11-37-5453 (OF300) ( 135k or 1120k )
Western portion of the double crater with the LM shadow.


Buzz got the camera from Neil and took a five-frame panorama (5454-5458) out his own window.


AS11-37-5454 (OF300) ( 62k or 732k )
This down-Sun photo was taken out of Buzz's LM window prior to the EVA. Note the western portion of the double crater just to the left of the LM shadow.
Before and After the EVA, Animated GIF ( 0.3 Mb or 2.7 Mb )
This comparison shows the change in shadow length between about 104:00, when 5454 was taken, and 112:21, when 5477 was taken. The first of the two photos was taken at about 21hr 32m on 20 July 1969 UTC/GMT; and the second at about 5hr 43m on 21 July. The solar elevations were 10.9 and 15.1 degrees at the two times, respectively. The LM, from the bottom of the footpads the the top edge of the rendezvous radar, is 7.04 meters tall, so the shadow lengths on level ground would have been 37 meters and 26 meters at the two times, respectively. For reference, the western member of the crater doublet has a diameter of about 12 meters. Animated GIF by Yuri Krasilnikov.
AS11-37-5455 (OF300) ( 96k or 980k )
View of lunar surface just after landing with the LM shadow and lunar horizon.
AS11-37-5456 (OF300) ( 148k or 1301k )
Continued pan to the right. The US flag will be set up below the center of this view. First look on the boulder field in some distance, which was suspected to originate from the impact that created West Crater. A thruster on Buzz' side appears in the lower right corner.
AS11-37-5457 (OF300) ( 147k or 185k )
Right of AS11-37-5456. A small, raised-rim crater in the background to the right appears.
AS11-37-5458 (OF300) ( 132k or 968k )
Rightward of AS11-37-5457. View out Buzz's window toward the Northwest prior to the EVA. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.


The following frame is the last taken on this magazine before the EVA.


AS11-37-5459 (OF300) ( 268k or 1946k )
Neil got the camera back from Buzz and took this frame, which is centered on the intersection between the two components of the double crater, with the younger crater to the right.


The last ninety-six frames were taken from inside the LM after EVA completion, as they report to Houston at 112:20:56. All the frames were taken with the magazine on the IVA camera.


AS11-37-5460 (OF300) ( 55k or 550k )
Buzz starts several redundant post-EVA pans to the left and right out of his window. Note that now, several hours after the landing, the LM shadow is noticeably shorter than in the same view from the pre-EVA panorama. Buzz may have made the footprints on the near rim of the double crater at the time he took his plus-Z pan
AS11-37-5461 (OF300) ( 61k or 584k )
Buzz moved slightly to his right to take this picture which, otherwise is similar to 5460.
AS11-37-5462 (OF300) ( 60k or 600k )
Buzz moved slightly to his left before taking another view similar to 5460.
AS11-37-5463 (OF300) ( 59k or 605k )
Buzz moved farther to his right to take this down-Sun.
AS11-37-5464 (OF300) ( 82k or 778k )
View to the right of 5463. Footprints are visible to the lower right.
AS11-37-5465 (OF300) ( 107k or 910k )
Rightward of 5464. View of lunar surface after EVA completion with the LM and US flag shadow. Numerous footprints are visible.
AS11-37-5466 (OF300) ( 134k or 1050k )
Rightward of 5465. View of lunar surface after EVA completion with the US flag.
AS11-37-5467 (OF300) ( 163k or 1223k )
Rightward of 5466. View of lunar surface after EVA completion with the US flag and TV camera. Note the difference between the darker, heavily disturbed soil around the camera, and the undisturbed light soil where Neil and Buzz didn't set foot. See also the routes on the Traverse Map and compare to the same area prior to the EVA. Thomas Schwagmeier has provided a comparison between 5467 and a DAC frame taken prior to launch, showing the change in orientation due to the RCS hot-fire check.
AS11-37-5468 (OF300) ( 172k or 1252k )
View out Buzz's window over the thrusters after the EVA. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
5468/9 Mini Pan ( 2.6Mb )
Assembled by David Harland.
AS11-37-5469 (OF300) ( 117k or 914k )
Rightward of 5468. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS11-37-5470 (OF300) ( 152k or 1125k )
View of lunar soil below Buzz's window after EVA completion with a part of the flag and the TV camera visible.
AS11-37-5471 (OF300) ( 203k or 1416k )
Similar to AS11-37-5470, a little higher with clear footprints around the LM and the flag. The thin, black shadow that is cast onto the surface directly beneath the center RCS thruster in the foreground originates from the solar wind collector staff, now bereft of its foil.
AS11-37-5472 (OF300) ( 232k or 1630k )
Similar to AS11-37-5470, with entire flag and camera.
AS11-37-5473 (OF300) ( 219k or 1560k )
Left of 5472.
AS11-37-5474 (OF300) ( 141k or 1100k )
Left of 5473. View of lunar soil after EVA completion with LM and flag shadow.
AS11-37-5475 (OF300) ( 76k or 687k )
The black shadow of the LM is silhouetted against the Moon's surface in this photograph taken from inside the lunar module. Impressions in the lunar soil made by the lunar boots of the two astronauts are clearly visible. Note that Buzz moved to his right to get the entire shadow in the field-of-view.
AS11-37-5476 (OF300) ( 54k or 531k )
Similar to AS11-37-5475, slightly on the left.
AS11-37-5477 (OF300) ( 67k or 682k )
Similar to AS11-37-5476 but aimed higher to include the horizon.
Before and After the EVA, Animated GIF ( 0.3 Mb or 2.7 Mb )
This comparison shows the change in shadow length between about 104:00, when 5454 was taken, and 112:21, when 5477 was taken. The first of the two photos was taken at about 21hr 32m on 20 July 1969 UTC/GMT; and the second at about 5hr 43m on 21 July. The solar elevations were 10.9 and 15.1 degrees at the two times, respectively. The LM, from the bottom of the footpads the the top edge of the rendezvous radar, is 7.04 meters tall, so the shadow lengths on level ground would have been 37 meters and 26 meters at the two times, respectively. For reference, the western member of the crater doublet has a diameter of about 12 meters. Animated GIF by Yuri Krasilnikov.
AS11-37-5478 (OF300) ( 85k or 795k )
Same as AS11-37-5475, slightly on the right. The flag shadow appears near a boulder.
AS11-37-5479 (OF300) ( 139k or 1178k )
View of lunar surface after EVA completion with the flag and its shadow, rightward of 5478
AS11-37-5480 (OF300) ( 155k or 1159k )
This post-EVA photo out Buzz's window shows the U.S. flag, the TV camera, and the cluster of boulders beyond which were probably ejected from West Crater. Note the raised rim on the fresh, young crater in the middle distance beyond and to the right of the TV camera. Note, also, the cable running from the MESA to the TV camera. Scans courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS11-37-5481 (OF300) ( 182k or 1364k )
Rightward from AS11-37-5480.
AS11-37-5482 (OF300) ( 220k or 1740k )
Same as AS11-37-5480.
AS11-37-5483 (OF300) ( 213k or 1654k )
Same as AS11-37-5480, a little to the left.
AS11-37-5484 (OF300) ( 166k or 1418k )
Same as AS11-37-5479.
AS11-37-5485 (OF300) ( 87k or 808k )
Same as AS11-37-5478.
AS11-37-5486 (OF300) ( 65k or 682k )
Same as AS11-37-5475.
AS11-37-5487 (OF300) ( 48k or 547k )
Same as AS11-37-5475, partially hidden.
AS11-37-5488 (OF300) ( 55k or 612k )
Same as AS11-37-5475.
AS11-37-5489 (OF300) ( 70k or 743k )
Same as AS11-37-5475.
AS11-37-5490 (OF300) ( 77k or 789k )
View to the WNW out Buzz's window after the EVA. Scans courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS11-37-5491 (OF300) ( 137k or 1234k )
Same as AS11-37-5479.
AS11-37-5492 (OF300) ( 61k or 731k )
Same as AS11-37-5475.
AS11-37-5493 (OF300) ( 67k or 772k )
Same as AS11-37-5475.
AS11-37-5494 (OF300) ( 84k or 937k )
Same as AS11-37-5475, with the flag shadow.
AS11-37-5495 (OF300) ( 132k or 1752k )
View of lunar surface after EVA completion with the flag and the TV camera.
AS11-37-5496 (OF300) ( 55k or 619k )
Buzz has handed the camera over to Neil, who now starts to document the post-EVA surface over on his side with a view to the West. The dark diffuse field in the center of the photo is an LPD marker in Neil's window.
AS11-37-5497 (OF300) ( 136k or 1269k )
View of lunar surface after EVA completion. The younger member of the double crater is at the lower right and the older member is at the lower left.
AS11-37-5498 (OF300) ( 146k or 1152k )
View of lunar surface after EVA completion. The LRRR appears just to the right of the thruster and the upper part of the seismometer antenna sticks up beyond the top of the thruster bell.
AS11-37-5499 (OF300) ( 97k or 793k )
Similar to AS11-37-5498. More of the PSEP (Passive Seismic Experiment Package) appears just over the thruster.
AS11-37-5500 (OF300) ( 152k or 1232k )
Same as AS11-37-5497.
AS11-37-5501 (OF300) ( 86k or 885k )
View of lunar surface after EVA completion, right of AS11-37-5500. The younger component of the double crater fills the near field.
AS11-37-5502 (OF300) ( 70k or 666k )
View of lunar surface after EVA completion, right of AS11-37-5501.
AS11-37-5503 (OF300) ( 184k or 1302k )
Same as AS11-37-5500, but clearer.
AS11-37-5504 (OF300) ( 178k or 1263k )
Same as AS11-37-5499.
AS11-37-5505 (OF300) ( 151k or 980k )
The black shadow of the LM is silhouetted against the Moon's surface in this photograph taken out Neil's window. Impressions in the lunar soil made by the lunar boots of the two astronauts are clearly visible.

Journal Contributor AwE130 has provided an enhanced detail which shows the Contingency Sample Collector (CSC) ring, which had been previously identified in EVA photo AS11-40-5864 by the Eric Jones. In the 5505 detail, we see a light-colored ""stem" on the outside of the ring which, as is suggested by the comparison with pre-flight photo S68-54939, fit in the Sampler handle to secure the ring in place. Journal Contributor Karl Dodenhoff has provided a photo of a CSC on display at the Kennedy Space Center. The base of the stem is marked. See also, procedures for CSC use from the Apollo 11 Final Lunar Surface Procedures volume, in which we learn that the "ring" was part of the "lip/bag assembly". AwE130 notes that the ring can also be seen in post-EVA photos AS11-39-5798-5800 and in EVA photo AS11-40-5871.

Note that, because this image was taken out Neil's window, we now realize that that the ring flew a few meters from the spot near the MESA, on the other side of the spacecraft, where we see Neil tossing the ring in 16-mm film shot out Buzz's window. See a discussion following 109:36:07

AS11-37-5506 (OF300) ( 20k or 236k )
View of earth from the lunar surface taken through the rendezvous window over Neil's head.
AS11-37-5507 (OF300) ( 19k or 261k )
Unsuccessful attempt to photograph the earth from the rendezvous window.
AS11-37-5508 (OF300) ( 19k or 224k )
Same as AS11-37-5507.
AS11-37-5509 (OF300) ( 18k or 238k )
Same as AS11-37-5507.
AS11-37-5510 (OF300) ( 58k or 626k )
Neil has handed the camera back to Buzz, who is again shooting through his window. LM black shadow silhouetted against the Moon's surface. Frames 5510 to 5517 have been assembled into a panorama.
AS11-37-5511 (OF300) ( 119k or 1040k )
View of the US flag from LM.
AS11-37-5512 (OF300) ( 145k or 1184k )
View of lunar surface from the LM, with the US flag and the TV camera. Boulders and a small crater in the background.
AS11-37-5513 (OF300) ( 80k or 669k )
View of lunar surface from the LM with a thruster in the foreground and three quite nicely lined-up craters in the background.
AS11-37-5514 (OF300) ( 74k or 645k )
Same as AS11-37-5513, a little to the right.
AS11-37-5515 (OF300) ( 151k or 1124k )
View of the TV camera from LM with a LM thruster on the foreground. Four craters are visible on the right of the camera.
AS11-37-5516 (OF300) ( 170k or 1288k )
The US flag, deployed on the surface of the Moon, dominates this photograph taken from inside the LM. The footprints are clearly visible around the flag.
AS11-37-5517 (OF300) ( 167k or 1272k )
Same as AS11-37-5516. The boulders in the background beyond the TV camera are probably ejecta from West Crater.
AS11-37-5518 (OF300) ( k or 378k )
Buzz has handed the camera back to Neil, who starts a series of photos over to his right through Buzz' window. Narrow view onto the lunar surface.
AS11-37-5519 (OF300) ( 4943k or 420k )
Same as AS11-37-5518 with the top of the flag and part of the flag shadow.
AS11-37-5520 (OF300) ( 46k or 386k )
View of lunar surface from LM, with a part of the flag and the TV camera. Some boulders and a small crater in the background.
AS11-37-5521 (OF300) ( 34k or 757k )
Now it's Buzz' turn to shoot through Neil's window, over to the left. Partial view of lunar surface.
AS11-37-5522 (OF300) ( 36k or 332k )
The camera is back with Neil, who is again shooting through Buzz' window to the right. View of lunar surface from LM, with the US flag shadow near a small boulder.
AS11-37-5523 (OF300) ( 56k or 450k )
View of lunar surface from LM, with the US flag and a part of the TV camera. Note that, from Neil's side of the cabin, the horizon beyond the TV camera is cutoff by the top of Buzz's window.
AS11-37-5524 (OF300) ( 48k or 415k )
View of lunar surface from LM, with a part of the flag and boulders in the background.
AS11-37-5525 (OF300) ( 45k or 387k )
View of lunar surface from LM, with US flag shadow.
AS11-37-5526 (OF300) ( 51k or 420k )
Neil has again handed the camera over to Buzz, who again is shooting to his left through Neil's window. Partial view of the lunar surface. The violet spot on the upper right of the window is the "eyepiece" of the COAS (Crewman Optical Alignment Sight).
AS11-37-5527 (OF300) ( 40k or 351k )
Same as AS11-37-5526. The dark diffuse streak extending below the violet COAS eyepiece is the LPD ladder in Neil's window.
AS11-37-5528 (OF300) ( 97k or 1656k )
Buzz took this picture of Neil in the cabin after the completion of the EVA. Neil has his helmet off but has not yet doffed his "Snoopy" cap. The circuit breaker panels are illuminated, and a small floodlight is on at the lower right. A circuit breaker chart has been fixed up on the wall with gray tape, below the rendezvous window in the cabin roof. Scans by Kipp Teague.
AS11-37-5529 (OF300) ( 78k or 1753k )
The COAS can be seen silhouetted against the window behind Neil. Scans by Kipp Teague.
AS11-37-5530 (OF300) ( 79k or 1528k )
Buzz has handed the camera back to Neil again who now attempts to portrait Buzz in the cabin. Washed out by the extremely bright light being reflected from the surface. The circuit breaker panel illumination on Buzz' side of the cabin is on, and just like Neil he is still wearing his Snoopy cap. Scans by Kipp Teague.
AS11-37-5531 (OF300) ( 81k or 1513k )
Post-EVA photo of Buzz. Scan by Kipp Teague.
AS11-37-5532 (OF300) ( 80k or 1695k )
Similar to AS11-37-5530. Buzz has turned his head and is looking out of the window.
AS11-37-5533 (OF300) ( 83k or 1670k )
Portrait of Buzz, who is now left of his window.
AS11-37-5534 (OF300) ( 89k or 1741k )
Post-EVA photo of Buzz. Note the 16-mm camera at the upper right. Scan and enhancement by Bob Farwell / Kipp Teague.
AS11-37-5535 (OF300) ( 61k or 746k )
Neil has handed the camera once more back to Buzz, who continues the pans out of his window. US Flag and TV camera from Buzz's window with a LM thruster in the foreground. The focus is still set to a close range, hence we see the surface out of focus, but have a sharp view on the RCS quad in the foreground.
AS11-37-5536 (OF300) ( 60k or 801k )
Similar to AS11-37-5535.
AS11-37-5537 (OF300) ( 58k or 760k )
Similar to AS11-37-5535.
AS11-37-5538 (OF300) ( 44k or 565k )
Similar to AS11-37-5535, a little higher.
AS11-37-5539 (OF300) ( 40k or 485k )
Left of AS11-37-5538, still out of focus.
AS11-37-5540 (OF300) ( 49k or 706k )
LM and US flag shadow on lunar surface from Buzz's window.
AS11-37-5541 (OF300) ( 36k or 539k )
Similar to AS11-37-5540, a little to the left.
AS11-37-5542 (OF300) ( 87k or 714k )
The TV camera on the lunar surface with a LM thruster in the foreground from Buzz's window. Buzz has noticed that the lens is set up wrong, and has eventually corrected the focus setting.
AS11-37-5543 (OF300) ( 63k or 562k )
The lunar surface with a LM thruster in the foreground from Buzz's window.
AS11-37-5544 (OF300) ( 131k or 923k )
The US flag, deployed on the surface of the Moon, dominates this photograph taken from inside the LM. The footprints are clearly visible around the flag.
AS11-37-5545 (OF300) ( 169k or 1169k )
The US flag, deployed on the surface of the Moon, dominates this photograph taken from inside the LM. In the far background is the deployed black and white lunar surface television camera which televised the lunar surface extravehicular activity. The footprints are clearly visible around the flag and the camera. The shadow on the right of the flag just below the thruster comes from the SWC staff (solar wind collector).
AS11-37-5546 (OF300) ( 112k or 854k )
Same as AS11-37-5545 with lunar horizon. Slightly stronger exposure settings than with similar shots before.
AS11-37-5547 (OF300) ( 115k or 899k )
Same as AS11-37-5546, a little on the left.
AS11-37-5548 (OF300) ( 135k or 975k )
The camera is once more back at Neil, who documents the surface experiments south of the LM. Two components of the EASEP are seen deployed. In the far background is the Passive Seismic Experiment Package(PSEP); and to the right and closer to the camera is the Laser Ranging Retro-Reflector (LR-3). A LM thruster appears on the foreground
AS11-37-5549 (OF300) ( 131k or 951k )
Same as AS11-37-5548. In a labeled detail, Journal Contributor Vlad Pustynski has identified a boulder Neil examined at about 111:00:01 and then left the Gold Camera upright on it while he deployed the LRRR and took documentation photos. See AS11-40-5952, which shows the ALSCC upright on this boulder. Neil grabbed the ASLCC at the start of his run to Little West Crater and took it with him.
AS11-37-5550 (OF300) ( 135k or 982k )
Same as AS11-37-5548.
AS11-37-5551 (OF300) ( 169k or 1195k )
Similar to 5548 but aimed a bit lower.
AS11-37-5552 (OF300) ( 139k or 986k )
Finally the camera is back with Buzz, who takes a last few shots of the US flag and the TV camera to the north of the LM.
AS11-37-5553 (OF300) ( 159k or 1136k )
Same as AS11-37-5546.
AS11-37-5554 (OF300) ( 184k or 1274k )
Same as AS11-37-5546.
AS11-37-5555 (OF300) ( 165k or 1123k )
Same as AS11-37-5546. This concludes Magazine 37.


Magazine 38/O (Color) Frames 5556-5689

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 0.7 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.


Magazine 38 was used in lunar orbit, primarily for photography of the lunar farside.



AS11-38-5728 ( 27k or 145k )
Black&white photo of Earth taken during the trip home from the Moon. Scans by Kipp Teague.

Magazine 39/Q (B & W) Frames 5737-5843

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.

Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 0.7 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.


This is a b/w Hasselblad magazine and was used for documenting the landing site by several redundant pans from inside the LM cabin, both before and after the EVA. Very similar to sequences taken on color Magazine 37. Neil and Buzz shot more frames in these pans than they were supposed to according to their Flight Plan and Surface Checklist. For the first 13 frames, this magazine was attached to the black IVA Hasselblad camera, which does not have a reseau plate.

Captions by Markus Mehring


Calibration Chart (OF300) ( 74k )

AS11-39-5737 (OF300) ( 69k or 514k )

LM shadow and ground towards the West, directly underneath Neil's window. Slightly sunstruck.
AS11-39-5738 (OF300) ( 222k or 1320k )
Ground and crater, left of AS11-39-5737.
AS11-39-5739 (OF300) ( 225k or 1268k )
Ground and crater, left of AS11-39-5738, with RCS thruster in the left foreground.
AS11-39-5740 (OF300) ( 30k or 277k )
LM shadow and ground with horizon towards the West. Slightly out of frame/obstructed.
AS11-39-5741 (OF300) ( 49k or 438k )
Similar to AS11-39-5740, a bit to the left, improved framing.
AS11-39-5742 (OF300) ( 81k or 675k )
Left of AS11-39-5741, good view on the crater under Neil's window.
AS11-39-5743 (OF300) ( 135k or 983k )
Left of AS11-39-5742.
AS11-39-5744 (OF300) ( 149k or 948k )
Left of AS11-39-5743. Better contrast than previous photos.
AS11-39-5745 (OF300) ( 178k or 1152k )
Left of AS11-39-5744, view towards the South, with RCS quad in the foreground.
AS11-39-5746 (OF300) ( 140k or 799k )
Left of AS11-39-5745, with RCS quad.
AS11-39-5747 (OF300) ( 135k or 908k )
A bit higher and right of AS11-39-5746, with RCS quad.
AS11-39-5748 (OF300) ( 79k or 614k )
Again a bit higher and to the right, with the horizon below the center of the photo, lower contrast than before.
AS11-39-5749 (OF300) ( 57k or 516k )
Right of AS11-39-5748, with LM shadow, horizon centered.


At this point, the magazine was detached from the black Hasselblad and went onto the silver EVA Hasselblad. Hence the next 42 frames show reseau crosses.


AS11-39-5750 (OF300) ( 44k or 386k )
Slightly right of AS11-39-5749, view towards the West.
AS11-39-5751 (OF300) ( 96k or 750k )
Left of AS11-39-5750, slightly lower.
AS11-39-5752 (OF300) ( 111k or 832k )
Left of AS11-39-5751, view towards the SW.
AS11-39-5753 (OF300) ( 117k or 820k )
Left of AS11-39-5752, view towards the South. RCS thruster in the lower left corner.
AS11-39-5754 (OF300) ( 118k or 822k )
Similar to AS11-39-5753, just slightly to the left.
AS11-39-5755 (OF300) ( 89k or 644k )
Slightly left of AS11-39-5754, with RCS thruster and left edge of the window.
AS11-39-5756 (OF300) ( 74k or 577k )
Over to the right of AS11-39-5755, with the near crater in the foreground. Slightly brighter than other photos.
AS11-39-5757 (OF300) ( 112k or 824k )
Left of AS11-39-5756, good view on the small crater.
AS11-39-5758 (OF300) ( 128k or 885k )
Left of AS11-39-5757, a bit darker.
AS11-39-5759 (OF300) ( 144k or 943k )
Left of AS11-39-5758, view towards the South, with RCS quad in the foreground.
AS11-39-5760 (OF300) ( 202k or 1250k )
A bit lower and to the right of AS11-39-5759, a view of the older of the small craters, nearer to the LM.
AS11-39-5761 (OF300) ( 197k or 1217k )
Right of AS11-39-5760, view towards the SW.
AS11-39-5762 (OF300) ( 133k or 909k )
Right of AS11-39-5761, with edge of LM shadow. Better exposure.


Buzz uses the magazine next, still on the EVA camera.


AS11-39-5763 (OF300) ( 51k or 443k )
Buzz starts a pan through his window. Good view on the full LM shadow, towards the West.
AS11-39-5764 (OF300) ( 66k or 545k )
Slightly right of AS11-39-5763.
AS11-39-5765 (OF300) ( 83k or 653k )
Right of AS11-39-5764.
AS11-39-5766 (OF300) ( 93k or 706k )
Very similar to AS11-39-5765.
AS11-39-5767 (OF300) ( 116k or 823k )
Slightly right of AS11-39-5766, with RCS thruster in the foreground.
AS11-39-5768 (OF300) ( 117k or 815k )
Slightly right of AS11-39-5767, RCS quad in the foreground.
AS11-39-5769 (OF300) ( 146k or 976k )
Slightly right of AS11-39-5768, view towards the North, RCS quad in the foreground.
AS11-39-5770 (OF300) ( 144k or 981k )
Very similar to AS11-39-5769, but significantly better exposure.
AS11-39-5771 (OF300) ( 63k or 484k )
Very good view on the LM shadow, towards the West.
AS11-39-5772 (OF300) ( 68k or 473k )
Very similar to AS11-39-5771, just a bit lower and to the right.
AS11-39-5773 (OF300) ( 103k or 656k )
Right of AS11-39-5772, edge of the LM shadow.
AS11-39-5774 (OF300) ( 139k or 835k )
Right of AS11-39-5773. Good view on the soil underneath Buzz' window, LM shadow and RCS thruster in the foreground.
AS11-39-5775 (OF300) ( 59k or 420k )
Good view on the LM shadow, towards the West. Longer exposure.
AS11-39-5776 (OF300) ( 122k or 765k )
Right of AS11-39-5775.
AS11-39-5777 (OF300) ( 137k or 800k )
Right of AS11-39-5776 and a bit lower. RCS quad to the right.
AS11-39-5778 (OF300) ( 136k or 885k )
Higher than AS11-39-5777, thus including the horizon towards the NW.
AS11-39-5779 (OF300) ( 117k or 792k )
Left of AS11-39-5778.
AS11-39-5780 (OF300) ( 136k or 913k )
Just slightly right of AS11-39-5779, but notably brighter. RCS quad to the right.
AS11-39-5781 (OF300) ( 153k or 1029k )
Similar to AS11-39-5780, but less bright.
AS11-39-5782 (OF300) ( 152k or 1025k )
Similar to AS11-39-5781, less bright and less contrast.
AS11-39-5783 (OF300) ( 139k or 934k )
A bit right of AS11-39-5782, RCS quad to the right.
AS11-39-5784 (OF300) ( 118k or 776k )
Good view towards the North, with RCS quad in the central foreground.
AS11-39-5785 (OF300) ( 162k or 1048k )
A bit lower than AS11-39-5784.
AS11-39-5786 (OF300) ( 51k or 426k )
View towards the West, with LM shadow and left edge of the window. Bright exposure.
AS11-39-5787 (OF300) ( 49k or 413k )
Similar to AS11-39-5786, just slightly to the left.
AS11-39-5788 (OF300) ( 46k or 401k )
Similar to AS11-39-5787, again just a bit to the left. One of very few photos that show the far edge of the crater under Neil's window as seen through Buzz' window.
AS11-39-5789 (OF300) ( 44k or 389k )
Very similar to AS11-39-5788, just a bit higher.



AS11-39-5790 (OF300) ( 53k or 442k )
Buzz has completed the pans through his window and has handed the camera back to Neil. View towards the West, with the same bright exposure settings as in the previous photos.
AS11-39-5791 (OF300) ( 40k or 346k )
Very similar to AS11-39-5790, but less bright.


This probably concludes the pre-EVA pans on this magazine, which at this point has been detached from the EVA camera prior to installation of Mag40/S for use during the EVA. As planned, the EVA camera was not brought back into the cabin at the end of the EVA, so all post-EVA photography by the LM crew was done with the IVA camera. Consequently, the images do not have reseau crosses.


AS11-39-5792 (OF300) ( 37k or 364k )
View generally West, turned by 90 degrees. The length of the LM shadow indicates this the first post-EVA frame.
AS11-39-5793 (OF300) ( 108k or 737k )
View towards the SE on the near crater.
AS11-39-5794 (OF300) ( 162k or 1055k )
View towards the South. Beyond the RCS quad in the foreground we can see the LRRR. This is the first definite post-EVA frame on this magazine, though the two previous ones are likely to be post-EVA as well.
AS11-39-5795 (OF300) ( 71k or 574k )
View towards the West, turned by 90 degrees. Good contrast.
AS11-39-5796 (OF300) ( 200k or 1241k )
View towards the SW on the nearer one of the craters under Neil's window.
AS11-39-5797 (OF300) ( 171k or 1044k )
View towards the South with the LRRR in the center, beyond the RCS quad. A few footsteps can be seen in the foreground soil.
AS11-39-5798 (OF300) ( 181k or 1001k )
View down onto the heavily disturbed soil directly under Neil's window. Many clear footsteps, and a sharp shadow cast by the -Y strut. Journal Contributor AwE130 has identified the Contingency Sampler ring in this iage. As indicated in a detail, it is at the lower right.
AS11-39-5799 (OF300) ( 92k or 515k )
Right of AS11-39-5798. The Sampler ring is at the lower left.
AS11-39-5800 (OF300) ( 113k or 632k )
Similar to AS11-39-5799.
AS11-39-5801 (OF300) ( 171k or 965k )
View down onto the nearby footsteps towards the South.
AS11-39-5802 (OF300) ( 135k or 744k )
Neil has handed the camera over to Buzz, who captures the many footsteps under his window, alongside with the US flag. Directly underneath the RCS thruster at the top we can see the shadow of the SWC staff. The +Y strut casts a shadow in the lower part of the photo.
AS11-39-5803 (OF300) ( 135k or 758k )
Similar to AS11-39-5802.
AS11-39-5804 (OF300) ( 113k or 688k )
Left of AS11-39-5803.
AS11-39-5805 (OF300) ( 43k or 341k )
Left of AS11-39-5804, a view onto the LM shadow towards the West. Not much depth, i.e. the top part is a bit out of focus.
AS11-39-5806 (OF300) ( 32k or 292k )
View from Buzz' window on the area left of the LM shadow, slightly obstructed by the left edge of the window.
AS11-39-5807 (OF300) ( 77k or 491k )
View on the ground towards the North, dominated by the RCS quad in the foreground. TV camera and tripod in the top left corner.
AS11-39-5808 (OF300) ( 97k or 616k )
Similar to AS11-39-5807, slightly to the left.
AS11-39-5809 (OF300) ( 124k or 742k )
Left of AS11-39-5808, a view on the extent of the disturbed soil, with the US flag. The TV camera in the background is a bit unsharp.
AS11-39-5810 (OF300) ( 140k or 820k )
Slightly left of AS11-39-5809.
AS11-39-5811 (OF300) ( 89k or 607k )
Left of AS11-39-5810, with shadow of the US flag.
AS11-39-5812 (OF300) ( 40k or 396k )
Good view on the LM shadow towards the West, albeit a bit out of focus.
AS11-39-5813 (OF300) ( 30k or 290k )
Left of AS11-39-5812, another view on the area left of the LM shadow.
AS11-39-5814 (OF300) ( 121k or 758k )
View on the ground towards the NE, with flag and disturbed soil.
AS11-39-5815 (OF300) ( 147k or 831k )
Right of AS11-39-5814.
AS11-39-5816 (OF300) ( 135k or 757k )
Slightly right of AS11-39-5815.
AS11-39-5817 (OF300) ( 89k or 544k )
Right of AS11-39-5816, dominated by the RCS quad in the foreground.
AS11-39-5818 (OF300) ( 116k or 670k )
Similar to AS11-39-5817, a bit to the left, a tad bit darker.
AS11-39-5819 (OF300) ( 140k or 786k )
Similar to AS11-39-5818, a bit to the left.
AS11-39-5820 (OF300) ( 128k or 770k )
Slightly left of AS11-39-5819.
AS11-39-5821 (OF300) ( k or k )
Left of AS11-39-5820.
AS11-39-5822 (OF300) ( 74k or 498k )
Left of AS11-39-5821, with the right edge of the LM shadow. By now, several hours after the landing, the sun has risen a bit and the LM shadow has shortened significantly, thus exposing a few rocks at its very top that previously sat in darkness. Note, though, that while the longer shadow is as apparent as the darkened rocks in comparable photos from before the EVA, the effect is deceiving, since these were taken with different cameras and different lenses. We have a good close-up view on these rocks in the photos Buzz took during his +Z pan (see AS11-40-5882 and 5883).
AS11-39-5823 (OF300) ( 38k or 341k )
Slightly left of AS11-39-5822, a view on the LM shadow towards the West.
AS11-39-5824 (OF300) ( 34k or 308k )
Left of AS11-39-5823.
AS11-39-5825 (OF300) ( 40k or 383k )
Similar to AS11-39-5824, a bit higher.
AS11-39-5826 (OF300) ( 42k or 364k )
Similar to AS11-39-5823 and 5824.
AS11-39-5827 (OF300) ( 38k or 322k )
Right of AS11-39-5826, LM shadow towards the West.
AS11-39-5828 (OF300) ( 81k or 532k )
Right of AS11-39-5827.
AS11-39-5829 (OF300) ( 148k or 865k )
Right of AS11-39-5828, with US flag.
AS11-39-5830 (OF300) ( 161k or 896k )
Right of AS11-39-5829, with flag, TV, and RCS thruster.
AS11-39-5831 (OF300) ( 131k or 746k )
Slightly right of AS11-39-5830, a bit tilted.
AS11-39-5832 (OF300) ( 45k or 397k )
View towards the West and the area left of the LM shadow, including the horizon. Notably less contrast from this photo on.
AS11-39-5833 (OF300) ( 50k or 439k )
Right of AS11-39-5832, a good view on the LM shadow.
AS11-39-5834 (OF300) ( 87k or 622k )
Right of AS11-39-5833, with flag shadow.
AS11-39-5835 (OF300) ( 147k or 867k )
Right of AS11-39-5834, a good view on the extent of the disturbed soil around the TV camera in the background.
AS11-39-5836 (OF300) ( 44k or 399k )
View generally West, with LM shadow.
AS11-39-5837 (OF300) ( 46k or 401k )
Similar to AS11-39-5836, just slightly left.
AS11-39-5838 (OF300) ( 56k or 480k )
Right of AS11-39-5837, a good view on the LM shadow and the rocks beyond its top.
AS11-39-5839 (OF300) ( 126k or 810k )
View towards the NE, with US flag.
AS11-39-5840 (OF300) ( 135k or 859k )
Buzz has handed the camera back to Neil. View towards the South, RCS quad in the foreground. Left of the top RCS thruster we see the Laser Ranging Retro Reflector (LRRR), above of the thruster we can see a bit of the Passive Seismic Experiment Package (PSEP). Low-contrast photo.
AS11-39-5841 (OF300) ( 115k or 694k )
Similar to AS11-39-5840, a better and unobstructed view on the PSEP and LRRR.
AS11-39-5842 (OF300) ( 128k or 763k )
Same as AS11-39-5841, again a bit better. In a labeled detail, Journal Contributor Vlad Pustynski has identified a boulder Neil examined at about 111:00:01 and then left the Gold Camera upright on it while he deployed the LRRR and took documentation photos. See AS11-40-5952, which shows the ALSCC upright on this boulder. Neil grabbed the ASLCC at the start of his run to Little West Crater and took it with him.
AS11-39-5843 (OF300) ( 140k or 814k )
Similar to AS11-39-5842. This concludes magazine 39.


Magazine 40/S (Color) Frames 5844-5970

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 0.7 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.


Magazine 40 was used in lunar orbit (first three frames) and then on the lunar surface. It contains all of the EVA photographs.


At 81:55:43 during LM activation in lunar orbit (Rev 4), Buzz put this magazine on the "surface camera" - meaning the EVA camera - which has a reseau plate. The first three images were taken in lunar orbit.


AS11-40-5844 ( 104k or 442k )
Craters Green and Hartman - lat/long 4N/134E - from lunar orbit prior to the landing. Like the first image on Magazine 37/R, this image was undoubtedly taken to make sure the film in the magazine would advance.They will have Rev 4 Earthrise/AOS at about 082:32:07 when they get to a longitude of about 110E. Frame 5844 was taken about 8-10 minutes earlier.
AS11-40-5845 (OF300) ( 91k or 14k )
Earth from lunar orbit, probably not long after Rev 4 Earthrise.

Journal Contributor Paul White has made detailed comparisons of cloud patterns seen in a large number of Apollo images with imagery taken at close to the same time by various meteorlogical satellites.

AS11-40-5846 (OF300) ( 638k or 98k )
View of Mare Fecunditatis from Armstrong's window. The two craters close together in the middle distance are Messier and Messier A, with light-colored rays extending westward from Messier A, the more distant of the two. Apollo 11 photo AS11-42-6304 shows the pair from overhead. Taruntius P is partially hidden behind the RCS thruster. Taruntius K is the slightly smaller crater further north. Taruntius H is the prominent crater west of K. These crater look relatively fresh. Taruntius K has a diameter of about 6 kilometers and has a raised rim. Section 4.1.1 in the Lunar Source Book indicates that a fresh crater of this size will have a depth (iincluding the rim) of about 1.2 km. The average inner slope is, then, about 22 degrees. The crater is undoubtedly bowl shaped, so the slope immediately inside the rim is considerably steeper than 22 degrees. During the Rev 4 pass over the foreground craters, the Sun's elevation was about 29 degrees, low enough to have produced a significant shadow inside the eastern rim but not reaching the center of the crater. The only other time prior to the landing when the crew would have had time to take this picture was on the Rev 5 pass. The Sun was a degree higher on that pass, still low enough to produce the inner shadow.



AS11-40-5847 (OF300) ( 832k or 160k )
View out Neil's window after the landing. The foreground crater at the bottom of the image is about 10 meters in diameter. The western half of this crater is overlain by a younger, 12-m crater.
AS11-40-5848 (OF300) ( 845k or 173k )
View out Neil's window after the landing, rightward of 5847. The foreground crater at the bottom of the image is about 10 meters in diameter. The western half of this crater is overlain by a younger, 12-m crater.
AS11-40-5849 (OF300) ( 568k or 105k )
Near surface and LM Shadow seen out Buzz's window. This is the only image taken with magazine 40/S on the IVA camera, which had an 80mm lens and lacked a reseau plate. A discussion is linked here.

Honeysuckle Polaroid ( 183k )

109:26:35 John Saxon, Operations Manager at Honeysuckle Creek during Apollo, has provided this polaroid image taken off the monitor at the tracking station. Saxon writes in May 2003, "I've scanned the attached at 300 dpi, resized/resampled to slightly smaller and saved jpg at min (100 percent quality) compression - other than that I have not attempted to clean up or sharpen, etc."


The locations where the EVA photos were taken have been determined photogrammetrically by Journal Contributor Vlad Pustynski in the course of detailed mapping he did of the Apollo 11 landing site.


Neil takes the first sequence of EVA photos: 5850 to 5875. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


Neil takes Pan 1, consisting of twelve frame, 5850-61. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


AS11-40-5850 (OF300) ( 1.1 Mb, 0.2 Mb, or remapped with Hugin ( 1.4 Mb. )

109:30:53 First EVA picture. Neil's first frame in a pan taken west of the ladder. Jettison bag under the Descent Stage, south footpad, bent probe, strut supports. The view is more or less up-Sun, so we are seeing the shadowed faces of boulders. 20 July 1969.
AS11-40-5850-51 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.3 Mb ) and Side-by-Side (LR) Stereopair ( 0.6 Mb
Anaglyph and stereopair, with perspective correction, by Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5851 (OF300) ( 1.0 Mb, 0.2 Mb, or remapped with Hugin ( 1.2 Mb. )
Rightward from 5850 without much overlap. There are a number of rocks scattered in the foreground, including a split boulder at the right edge. 20 July 1969.
AS11-40-5852 (OF300) ( 0.9 Mb, 0.2 Mb, or remapped with Hugin ( 1.1 Mb. )
Rightward from 5851, with little overlap. Cross-Sun to the south. This frame is from Neil's initial pan taken from near the bottom of the ladder. This frame shows the older, eastern component of the double crater below Neil's LM window. This crater is about 10 meters across. It's western half is overlain by a younger, 12-m crater. See, also, David Harland's assembly of the Pre-EVA Double Crater view out Neil's window. 20 July 1969.
AS11-40-5852-53 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.4 Mb ) and Side-by-Side (LR) Stereopair ( 0.6 Mb
Anaglyph and stereopair, with perspective correction, by Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5853 (OF300) ( 0.7 Mb, 0.1 Mb, or remapped with Hugin ( 0.9 Mb. )
Rightward of 5852, showing the younger, western component of the double crater below Neil's LM window. Note the raised rim of a crater on the horizon. A comparison of details from this frame with a detail from the corresponding view out Neil's window in 5848 indicates that the crater is relatively close to the LM.
AS11-40-5853-54 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.2 Mb ) and Side-by-Side (LR) Stereopair ( 0.6 Mb
Anaglyph and stereopair, with perspective correction, by Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5854 (OF300) ( 0.4 Mb or remapped with Hugin ( 0.5 Mb. )
Rightward of 5853, showing the down-Sun view along the LM shadow with boulders on the local horizon. A comparison of a detail from 5854 with a similar view from Buzz's window in AS11-37-5454 shows that a crater rim on the horizon in the 5454 is almost completely obscured in the surface view, with only the highest portion visible in 5854. Note, also, the split boulder on the right that is partially shadowed by the LM.
AS11-40-5855 (OF300) ( 0.6 Mb or remapped with Hugin ( 0.8 Mb. )
Rightward of 5854. Note the sharp-rimmed crater on the horizon at the far right. This crater is to the right beyond the TV camera, on a continuation of the line from the US flag to the TV camera, in AS11-37- 5516.
AS11-40-5855/6 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 280k ) and Side-by-Side (LR) Stereopair ( 0.6 Mb
Red-blue anaglyph by Yuri Krasilnikov. The fresh, sharp-rimmed crater on the right edge of the anaglyph can also be seen in Buzz's post-EVA window pan and in the 8 August 2009 LRO image ( 0.2 Mb ) of the landing site. Alternate version ( 0.8 Mb ) and LR stereopair by Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5856 (OF300) ( 0.8 Mb, 0.1 Mb or remapped with Hugin ( 1.0 Mb. )
Rightward of 5855, with the small, sharp-rimmed crater centered on the local horizon. Note an additional small crater to the right, which can be seen above the upper thruster in AS11-37- 5515.
AS11-40-5856-57 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.7 Mb ) and Side-by-Side (LR) Stereopair ( 0.6 Mb
Anaglyph and stereopair, with perspective correction, by Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5857 (OF300) ( 848k, 162k, or remapped with Hugin ( 1.1 Mb. )
Rightward of 5856, with a relatively large crater on the horizon at the right.
AS11-40-5857-58 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.5 Mb ) and Side-by-Side (LR) Stereopair ( 0.6 Mb
Anaglyph and stereopair, with perspective correction, by Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5858 (OF300) ( 0.9 Mb, 0.2 Mb or remapped with Hugin ( 1.2 Mb. )
Rightward of 5857, showing the plus-Y (north) footpad. The probe is flat on the ground pointing north, the MESA is at the right edge of the photo. Note the detailed radial sweep pattern created in the foreground by the descent engine exhaust.
AS11-40-5859 (OF300) ( 553k or 88k )
View toward the south past the ladder. A comparison with 5850 indicates that Neil has moved north away from the spot near the foot of the ladder from which he took his initial pan. The image is blurred, indicating that Neil may have hurried the shot. The west footpad is in shadow but there is reasonable definition of the lower portion of the ladder. A 2010 photogrammetric analysis by Vlad Pustynski indicates that Neil moved 3.9 meters north.
AS11-40-5859-60 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph, with perspective correction, by Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5859-61 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph, with perspective correction, by Eric Jones. Vlad Pustynski calls attention to Neil's movements during this series, as shown in a simplified map detail.
AS11-40-5860 (OF300) ( 801k or 117k )
Similar to 5859 but not as badly blurred. View toward the south showing the ladder and the jettison bag.
AS11-40-5860-61 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.8 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph, with perspective correction, by Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5861 (OF300) ( 479k or 106k )
Rightward of 5860. The older, eastern portion of the double crater is on the right, beyond the LM shadow.


Neil takes two photos of Buzz coming out through the hatch, 5862-63 and two of the jettison bag under the descent stage, 5864-65. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


AS11-40-5862 (OF300) ( 1333k or 255k )
109:39:57 First photo of Buzz coming out through the hatch. The inward-opening hatch is on his left. Buzz is kneeling, probably with his hands on the midstep. We can see his heels, the lower portion of his PLSS and his left arm. Elsewhere in the image, both sets of thrusters are visible, along with Neil's window with the LPD grid etched on it, the straps of the Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC) coming out thru the hatch on the left, the upper portion of the ladder, the porch, and the plume deflector on the downward thruster on Buzz's side. The US flag that Neil and Buzz will deploy later is stowed in a long, thin canister attached to the underside of the lefthand rail of the ladder. Journal Contributor Markus Mehring notes that, thru the CDR's window, we can see " the crash bar, and a checklist/cue card that's been stuck under the overhead window with grey tape! -The same card can be seen right behind Neil in the post-EVA portrait, AS11-37-5528".
AS11-40-5863 (OF300) ( 1024k or 186k )
109:40:27 Buzz has his PLSS most of the way out of the hatch. His feet are near the lip of the porch. Neil has moved around to the south of the ladder a little bit. Note the near-side handrail and the triangular Commander's window above and to the right of the hatch. There is a reflection of the lunar surface in the window. To Buzz's left, we can see a set of thrusters and the plume deflector that protects the LM from the downward thruster exhaust.
AS11-40-5864 (OF300) ( 1110k or 243k )
109:40:27 Shows the area under the Descent Stage, including the jettison bag. Neil turned to his right to take this photo while waiting for Buzz to get farther out of the cabin. A detail shows what may be the contingency sampler ring. See, however, the discussion following 109:36:07.
AS11-40-5865 (OF300) ( 1389k or 312k )
109:40:27 Rightward of 5864, showing south footpad and the bent probe. The jett bag is on the right side of the image. Little West Crater is slightly north of up-Sun, in the distance above the footpad. As can be determined from Mission Report figure 5-8, Little West Crater subtends about 35 degrees - 3 1/2 fiducial spacings - at the LM. The approximate extent of the crater is indicated in a detail.


Neil takes four photos of Buzz on the ladder, 5866-69. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


AS11-40-5866 (OF300) ( 848k or 183k )
109:41:56 Buzz is jumping down to the top rung of the ladder and hasn't quite landed on it. He is gripping the handrail with both hands and, rather than walk down the ladder, he is hopping down. In a detail we can see the feedwater controls on the righthand corner of the bottom of Buzz's PLSS. In a second detail the LEC strap and hooks are labeled along with the strap and hooks of the waist tether Buzz has just attched to the porch rail. In the full photo, the MESA is immediately beyond the lower rungs of the ladder. John Sarkissian has spotted the TV lens peeking out from under the MESA blanket in an enhanced detail. Compare with training photo S69-31060. Vlad Pustynski notes that the bright boulder visible just above the MESA and just to the right of the inside edge of the north strut can also be seen in 5903.
AS11-40-5867 (OF300) ( 816k or 167k )
109:42:28 Buzz has reached the next to last rung and has transferred his grip from the porch rail to the outside rails that are on the ladder itself. The hatch is mostly closed and we can see the dump valve cover which is near the hinged side of the hatch. There are some taped instructions on the outside of the hatch. The hose at the right side of Buzz's PLSS which passes under his right arm would deliver emergency oxygen from the Oxygen Purge System (OPS) should he need it. We can also see the OPS actuator cable coming over his right shoulder. We can see some detail on the boot straps. There are horizontal strips of Velcro on the back of the PLSS, which were apparently installed to give the astronauts, while in zero-gravity, a place to anchor their feet on the side bulkhead behind Neil's station. Near the bottom of the back of the PLSS, we can see a sewn-on set of instructions for PLSS recharge operations (not performed on Apollo 11) just above the semi-circular flap. Note that craters and rocks can be seen in the reflection of the lunar surface in Neil's window.
AS11-40-5868 (OF300) ( 794k or 174k )
109:42:42 Buzz has reached the bottom rung of the ladder and is about the jump down to the footpad. As he said at the moment Neil took this picture, "Okay. I'm going to leave that one foot up there and both hands down to about the fourth rung up." The thermal shroud protecting the U.S. flag that Neil and Buzz deploy during the EVA can be seen on the underside of the lefthand ladder rail. See, also, NASA photo S69-38755. which shows the flag on a LM mockup in Houston. Ulli Lotzmann has provided a detail which shows the valve cluster on the right, front corner of the bottom of Buzz's PLSS.
AS11-40-5869 (OF300) ( 965k or 171k )
109:42:53 Buzz has both feet on the footpad. His hands are between the third and fourth rungs. His bent knees suggest that he is about to try to jump up to the lowest rung. His OPS antenna is up.


Neil takes two photos of the LM, 5870-71, and two of Buzz deploying the Solar Wind Collector, 5872-73. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


AS11-40-5870 (OF300) ( 1144k or 233k )
109:46:25 This photo of the north footpad and probe indicates that the spacecraft drifted toward the south between contact and touchdown. A labeled detail shows the probable point of initial contact, the final position of the probe tip, and a mound of soil built up on the south side of the footpad during its final motions. There seems to be a suggestion of an initial pad imprint about half a pad diameter north of its final location. Note the radial sweep pattern in the foreground soil created by the descent engine.
AS11-40-5871 (OF300) ( 1144k or 233k )
109:47:52 View to the south of the shadowed area behind the ladder. It is possible that this was an unintentional shot taken as Neil prepared to remove the MESA blankets. Journal Contributor AwE130 has identified the Contingency Sampler ring in this image. In adetail, it is just to the right and below center.
AS11-40-5872 (OF300) ( 1338k or 268k )
110:03:24. Buzz is deploying the Solar Wind Collector (SWC), a foil sheet which he is pointing at the Sun. Note the word 'Shade' printed on the bottom of the back side. The word 'Sun' is printed on the sunward side. At the end of the EVA, after leaving the SWC exposed to the Sun for about 1 hour and 17 minutes, Buzz will roll up the foil and pack it in a bag for analysis back on Earth. Note the considerable clearance between the bottom of the Descent Engine bell and the surface beneath it. Little West Crater is near the horizon on the lefthand side of the image. Note the pattern of scratch marks running from the MESA toward the lower left that were created by the TV cable as Neil took the camera away from the LM on the tripod. Neil's footprints are generally to the right of the cable scratches as he moved sideways out from the LM. Several potentially foot-grabbing loops remain in the cable. The rendezvous radar and various antennas on the top of the ascent stage are labeled in a detail ( 223k ). Each of the boot prints is about 33 cm long and has a greatest width of 15 cm.
AS11-40-5873 (OF300) ( 1288k or 269k )
Neil took this picture of Buzz at about 110:03:24. Buzz has just deployed the Solar Wind Collector (SWC). Neil took the photo toward the southeast. Buzz is standing flat-footed next to the SWC, facing Neil, who is at about the 2 o'clock position out from the LM. In the lower right corner, notice the scratch marks that the TV cable made as Neil pulled it out. The multiple tracks were made by the individual cable loops scraping along the ground. We can see underneath the engine bell. Most of the surface in this image has not been disturbed as yet, and in the places where Neil and Buzz have walked, the disturbed surface is darker. Good illustration of this very common phenomenon. Jack Schmitt speculates that the Descent Engine plume swept away the smallest particles, leaving a higher than normal percentage of larger particles. The more jagged surface is a better reflector of sunlight than the normal surface and, therefore, appears brighter. Certainly, from orbit, the areas around the landed LM's are brighter than the normal surface. As they walk around, the astronauts disturb this modified surface and, in effect, restore it's normal condition. We see the MESA, in shadow, to the right of Buzz. On the front of Buzz's suit, we have the RCU, the camera bracket, and just above his crotch, the "Red Apple" activator for the purge valve. He has some dirt on his knees. A detail shows a carabiner fitted to the end of his neckring tiedown.
S69-40308 ( 128k )
This frame from the 16-mm camera mounted in the LM window shows Neil (left) and Buzz (right) deploying the U.S. Flag. It was taken at about 110:09:50. Scan by Kipp Teague.


Neil takes two photos of Buzz saluting the U.S. Flag, 5874-75. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


AS11-40-5874 (OF300) ( 1211k or 228k )
110:10:33 Buzz salutes the U.S. Flag. His fingertips are visible on the far side of his faceplate. Note the well-defined footprints in the foreground. Buzz is facing up-Sun. There is a reflection of the Sun in his visor. At the bottom of Buzz's faceplate, note the white 'rim' which is slightly separated from his neckring. This 'rim' is the bottom of his gold visor, which he has pulled down. We can see the LEC straps hanging down inside of the ladder strut. In the foreground, we can see the foot-grabbing loops in the TV cable. The double crater under Neil's LM window is just beyond the LM shadow.
AS11-40-5875 (OF300) ( 1205k or 232k )
110:10:33 Buzz and the U.S. flag. Note the well-defined footprints in the foreground. The shadows indicate that Buzz is standing with the Sun directly in front of him. There is a reflection of the Sun in his visor. We can see the LEC straps hanging down inside of the ladder strut. In the foreground, we can see the foot-grabbing loops in the TV cable. The double crater is beyond Buzz and the LM shadow.

Journal Contributors Owen Merrick, Brian McInall, and Markus Mehring call attention to the fact that, in the high-resolution detail by Thomas Schwagmeier, we can see Buzz peering over at Neil. In 5874 Buzz is facing the flag and saluting; but, by the time Neil takes 5875, Buzz has turned his body slightly - and his head a great deal more - to look over to see if Neil has taken the picture, possibly having lowered his right hand in the interim. Normally, the high reflectivity of the gold visor would keep us from seeing Buzz's face but, as Mehring notes, in this case "his face is directly illuminated by the sunlight from the front and at a right angle to the observer's point of view, so it literally shines through the visor, especially because he's sticking his head forward. At different viewing and illumination angles and with his head deeper inside the helmet and less brightly illuminated, reflections off of the visor that would wash out anything behind it. But in this case we're lucky." Journal Contributor Harald Kucharek has created a two-frame movie consisting of frames 5874 and 5875 which clearly shows Buzz turning his torso slightly between frames, but without moving his feet. Note, in particular, the change in his knee positions. Both the TV record and the 16--mm film show Buzz turning in Neil's direction twice during this interval.


After taking 5875, Neil put the Hasselblad on the MESA. Later, Buzz got the camera off the MESA and took the next sequence of photos: 5876 to 5896.


Buzz takes five photos for the Bootprint Penetration Experiment, 5876-80. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.



AS11-40-5876 (OF300) ( 1050k or 215k )

110:25:09 Buzz took this picture of a pristine surface before making a bootprint. He took the camera off the RCU bracket and took this series of bootprint pictures holding the camera in his hands. Buzz was in the field-of-view of the 16mm movie camera mounted in his LM window. A description of his actions follows 110:25:09.
AS11-40-5877 (OF300) ( 1283k or 283k )
110:25:09 Buzz made this footprint on a pristine surface so that he could then photograph it for study by soil mechanics experts.
AS11-40-5877/8 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3.9 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-40-5878 (OF300) ( 1272k or 219k )
110:25:09 Buzz moved away slightly to take this second image of the fresh bootprint, getting slightly better focus.
AS11-40-5879 (OF300) ( 910k or 195k )
110:27:00 A close-up of the surface with a two-inch rock and, in the lower right corner, Buzz's boot and footprint. Near the upper left there appears to be a cohesive clump of soil lifted -or pushed - out of a bootprint.
AS11-40-5880 (OF300) ( 967k or 202k )
Second photo of Buzz's second soil-mechanics bootprint.


Buzz takes Pan 2, consisting of eleven frames, 5881-91. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


AS11-40-5881 (OF300) ( 1232k or 241k )
110:31:47 This first frame from Buzz's plus-Z pan shows the southwestern wall of the younger component of the double crater. Buzz is standing on the northeast rim about 7 meters WSW of the ladder footpad. The diameter of this component is about 12 meters. The small crater near the top of the far wall can also be seen in Neil's earlier photo AS11-40-5853.
AS11-40-5882 (OF300) ( 765k or 135k )
110:31:47 Rightward from 5881, with very little overlap. Note the bright 'halo' around the shadow of Buzz's helmet, which is probably produced by a coincidence of maximum zero-phase backscatter with that part of Buzz's shadow. Markus Mehring notes that the horizon feature beyond Buzz's shadow is a portion of the rim of a cluster of overlapping craters west of the landing site, as indicated in a comparison between details from 5882 and 82a and pre-landing overhead AS11-37-5447. The horizon feature at the righthand edge of 5882 is another portion of the cluster rims.
AS11-40-5882a (OF300) ( 821k or 145k )
110:31:47 Rightward from 5882, with very little overlap. Buzz is standing near the tip of the LM shadow.

A question from Journal Contributor Paolo Attivissimo led to a side-by-side comparison between 5882 and 5882a. By matching features in the overlap region, we see that, when Buzz turned to his right between the frames, he also moved to his right and forward. The fact that the separation of the images of a single rock is farther apart near the horizon than in the foreground is an indication that he moved to his right, and the greater tilt of the lines in the foreground is an indication of his motion forward.

Journal Contributor Tom McKeever notes that 5882a includes the shadow of the rendezvous radar antenna, which is also shown in a LM-9 photo by Randy Attwood. Note the large rock just to the right of the LM shadow. A comparison with AS11-39-5822, a picture Buzz took out his window after the EVA, shows how much the early-morning shadow changes in a few hours.

AS11-40-5882a-83 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.0 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5883 (OF300) ( 699k or 151k )
110:31:47 Rightward from 5882a, looking northwest across the boulder field. The rock on the edge of the LM shadow appears to have split on impact.
AS11-40-5883-84 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.4 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Yuri Krasilnikov. See, also, an alternate version ( 1.1 Mb ) by Eric Jones
AS11-40-5884 (OF300) ( 794k or 173k )
110:31:47 Rightward from 5883 toward the TV camera.
AS11-40-5884-85 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 152k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5885 (OF300) ( 876k or 159k )
110:31:47 Rightward from 5884 with the flag and the Solar Wind Collector (SWC) on the right. A detail shows a distant feature, which Markus Mehring identifies with a rim segment in the distinctive cluster of craters just outside the landing ellipse to the north. See the discussion following 107:05:31.
AS11-40-5885-86 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 224k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5886 (OF300) ( 1016k or 155k )
110:31:47 Rightward of 5885. This frame from Buzz's plus-Z pan is the only good Hasselblad picture of Neil on the lunar surface. Eric Nelson has produced an enhance version ( 320k ) of the portion of the image that includes the flag, the SWC, and Neil at the MESA. A closer detail ( 195k ) shows Neil packing the bulk sample with an open rockbox on the MESA table. See the discussion following 110:31:47.
AS11-40-5887 (OF300) ( 1422k or 311k )
110:31:47 Rightward from 5886 with the plus-Z (ladder) strut on the left and the jettison bag underneath the LM between the plus-Z strut and the minus-Y (south) strut.
AS11-40-5888 (OF300) ( 1472k or 321k )
110:31:47 Rightward from 5887. View along the northern rim of the older component of the double crater. Buzz is standing on the northeast rim of the younger component about 7 meters WSW of the ladder footpad. The diameter of the older component is about 10 meters.
AS11-40-5888-89 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones. See, also, an alternate version ( 0.4 Mb ) by Yuri Krasilnikov.
AS11-40-5889 (OF300) ( 1357k or 272k )
110:31:47 Rightward from 5888. Shows the rest of the older, eastern portion of the double crater and crossing the image from the center of the right edge to the lower left corner, the rim of the younger, eastern component.
AS11-40-5889-90 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5890 (OF300) ( 1314k or 269k )
110:31:47 This next frame in Buzz's pan shows the eastern part of the younger component of the double crater.
AS11-40-5890-91 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.7 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones. See, also an alternate version ( ) by Yuri Krasilnikov.
AS11-40-5891 (OF300) ( 1140k or 236k )
110:31:47 This next frame completes Buzz's plus-Z pan and overlaps frame 5881.


Buzz takes five photos to document the condition of the LM, 5892-96. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


AS11-40-5892 (OF300) ( 1711k or 339k )
110:34:13 Buzz took this picture of the surface beneath the LM from near the minus-Y (south) strut. The engine bell is at the upper left. The probe on the south footpad is at right center and we can see how that probe was dragged from the initial contact point. The jettison bag is in the foreground, with two anonymous pieces of trash next to it. They may be pieces of padding from the Sample Return Container (SRC), also known as the rock box, which Neil opened shortly after deploying the TV.
AS11-40-5893 (OF300) ( 1040k or 141k )
110:34:13 Buzz is still near the minus-Y footpad and pointed the camera up to take this picture of the Ascent Stage. It shows the thrusters on Neil's side of the spacecraft.
AS11-40-5894 (OF300) ( 1827k or 232k )
110:34:13 This underexposed picture of the Ascent Stage shows Neil at the MESA (lower left corner). The fact that Neil is in this picture was first noticed by Apollo historian Andrew Chaikin. See, also, a detail of Neil. An enhanced version of the detail by Ulli Lotzmann shows that Neil has his side visor pulled forward and that his gold visor is up.
AS11-40-5895 (OF300) ( 1180k or 161k )
110:34:13 In this picture of the plus-Z footpad and lower strut, we see Neil's legs as he stands at the MESA.
AS11-40-5896 (OF300) ( 1176k or 141k )
110:34:13 Similar to 5895. Ulli Lotzmann has captured a high-resolution detail ( 307k ) showing the sunlit toe of Neil's left boot - the one he used to step onto the lunar surface for the first time - and, with contrast enhancement, his knees and lower leg. Neil is facing to the right and slightly toward the camera. Because of that stance and the fact that he has the lower part of his right leg bent back slightly, the right toe is in the deep shadow.

Journal Contribributor Robert Hartfield, recalling Kipp Teague's enhancement of Apollo 15 photo AS15-88-11882 that revealed details of the damage to the descent engine bell during landing, wondered if enhancement of photos of the shadowed area around the Apollo 11 ladder footpad would show any footprints. He suggested Neil's photos 5859, 60, 61, 69 and Buzz's photo 5896. Kipp was unable to bring out any surface details from the suggested Armstrong photos, but had success with 5896, probably because of different camera settings.


After getting the camera from Buzz, Neil took the next sequence of photos: 5897 to 5903. He probably then put the camera on the MESA.


Neil takes five photos of the plaque, 5897-5901. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


AS11-40-5897 (OF300) ( 1162k or 199k )

110:41:07 After finishing at the MESA, Neil joined Buzz at the ladder. Buzz gave the camera to Neil, who took four frames of the plaque on the ladder strut and three pictures of the bulk sample area. This is the first of the plaque photos. Syd Buxton has provided a cleaned-up version of a B&W reproduction of the plaque he found on the MSFC website.
AS11-40-5898 (OF300) ( 1009k or 184k )
110:41:07 Similar to 5897. Second of Neil's plaque photos.
AS11-40-5899 (OF300) ( 1303k or 232k )
110:41:07 Neil either taken a longer exposure or has changed the f-stop setting. Best of the plaque pictures.
AS11-40-5900 (OF300) ( 1177k or 182k )
110:41:07 Neil took this picture of the ladder strut from the left at a lower f-stop number than he used for 5899.
AS11-40-5901 (OF300) ( 1060k or 191k )
110:42:14 Photo of the bulk sample area from just north of the ladder.


Neil takes two full-length portraits of Buzz, 5902-03. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


AS11-40-5902 (OF300) ( 1185k or 254k )

110:42:14 Buzz is standing just beyond the north strut. Note the distinctive dust smudges on Buzz's legs. The photo also shows the furrows in the bulk sample area and the area to the left of the footpad that shows unmistakable signs of sweeping by the descent engine exhaust. In a detail Ulli Lotzmann notes a reflected image of the rendezvous radar.

Karl Dodenhoff writes that the strap hanging down from behind Buzz's RCU is "the neck ring pull-down strap. It connected to the pull down locking mechanism that also served as the upper PLSS/RCU attachment fitting on the chest of the A7L suit." Mick Hyde provides a photo taken in 2002 of Bill Ander's Apollo 8 suit at the Science Museum London. The strap is tucked into a pouch. The A7L suit was used prior to Apollo 15, when the LM crews started using the A7L-B.

AS11-40-5903 (OF300) ( 1174k or 258k )
110:42:14 Neil has moved to the MESA. Ulli Lotzmann has captured a frame from the 16mm film showing Neil as he takes 5903. No other Apollo photograph has been reproduced as often as this portrait of Buzz. Neil is, of course, visible in reflection on Buzz's visor. Buzz has his left arm raised and is probably reading the checklist sewn on the wrist cover of his glove, which is shown in a detail. He is moving his right foot forward, as can be seen by the mound of dirt building up in front of the toe of that boot. Note the dirt adhering to Buzz's boots and knees. Otherwise, he is remarkably clean. The "Red Apple", which he would grab and pull to open his purge valve in the event of a suit leak or a PLSS failure, is located roughly over his navel. From our perspective, the purge valve is installed in the connector to the left of the "Red Apple".

Many readers will note that the scan from original film looks different from the presentation of 5903 that the world has been seeing since the image was released soon after Neil, Mike, and Buzz returned from the Moon. See a history of the image linked here.

Journal Contributor Markus Mehring has produced a rectified close-up of Neil's reflection in Buzz's visor. "I scanned the best and largest print I had available, removed the roughly 5 degree tilt that the original has in relation to the horizon, mirrored it, adjusted color in order to somewhat get rid of the golden tint of the visor, and re-projected it flat in order to kill as much spherical appearance as tolerable - hence the smear on the edges, which is impossible to avoid."

In March 2005, Journal Contributor Eric Nelson digitally removed the gold color of Buzz's visor ( 321k ) and revealed an unmistakably blue reflection of Earth. Nelson writes, " I eliminated most all of the gold visor tint, leaving a spot that wasn't white and so suggested itself as a film artifact rather than a piece of dust. On scanned slide film, dust would be black anyway, unless it might be some small translucent particle. I get the feeling the AS-11 master film scanning was done with some attention to cleanliness though, which should exclude any foreign objects of that size on the image. It is possible to verify whether any wanted or unwanted tint remains in neutrals in an image by temporarily saturating them heavily; I did that to the Spot toward 100% increase, and it turned Earth-Blue. I similarly saturated the gold-subtracted lunar surface reflections, and the open sunlit surface remained neutral while the surface in the influence of reflection from the LM turned gold: this suggests the gold subtraction was accurate and revealed a valid neutral image. This suggests the gold-subtracted spot did have a blue component...and I hope I don't take too much artistic license in exaggerating it to produce a psycho-visual link!"

Kipp Teague writes "I returned to the original June 2004 JSC scan of AS11-40-5903, cropped to Aldrin's visor, flipped and slightly rotated the image and took a stab at adjusting color to offset the gold in the visor. The linked image ( 109k ) represents the original scanning resolution. I don't see a BRIGHT blue object in the sky, but indeed, whatever is there is bluish in color, and more importantly, it is NOT single-pixel scanner noise as I can see elsewhere in the scan. Even better, when you enlarge this, you can see that the object generally matches in shape the Earth as viewed over the LM in AS11-40-5924."

In addition to investigations of the intrinsic characteristics of the Spot, it is necessary to verify that geometric factors are all correct. A check of JPL Horizons shows that, at 0414 UT on 21 July 1969, Earth was 59.07 degrees above the western Tranquility horizon at an azimuth of 273.11. The Sun was 14.74 degrees above eastern horizon at an azimuth of about 88.84 degrees. The fact that the azimuth difference between the Earth and the Sun was close to 180 degrees, an image of Earth, if any, would be near the line of Buzz's shadow. Further, because the Earth was about 60 degrees above the western horizon, its reflection would appear at a place on the visor where a line perpendicular to the visor surface is 30 degrees (half the Earth's elevation) above horizontal. A labeled detail from AS11-40-5875 ( 74k ) shows that this condition is met near the top of the visor.

Sharp-eyed readers will have noticed that the analysis is not yet complete. With Earth slightly north of west and the Sun lightly north of east, the reflected image of Earth should be on the opposite side of the reflected image of Buzz's shadow from the reflected LM. Nelson has produced a rectified detail ( 192k ) in which "I re-projected the visor image to flatten the horizon (effectively killing barrel distortion), rotated the horizon to level, and then horizontally skewed the image to parallel and square-to-vertical the LM descent stage sides. Finally I mirrored it to produce a normal view to the west. Some distortions remain, which suggests the visor isn't spherical, so that could explain sundry slight geometric inconsistencies in the rough analysis.". The rectified image shows the tentative Earth 'image' tantalizingly close to the line of Buzz's shadow, but on the wrong side. It is tempting to think that consideration of the actual figure of the gold visor will move the 'image' to the other side of the line of Buzz's shadow, but the necessary analysis is yet to be done.


After getting the camera from either the MESA or Neil, Buzz took the next sequence of photos: 5904 to 5926.


Buzz takes Pan 3, consisting of thirteen frames, 5904-16. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


AS11-40-5904 (OF300) ( 67k )

110:43:33 Unintended photo of one of the suits, probably taken when Buzz got the camera either from Neil or off the MESA.
AS11-40-5905 (OF300) ( 1104k or 225k )
110:43:33 This photo was taken from the north of the LM. Buzz has taken the camera out there to take a pan, as per checklist. This is an excellent picture of the flag, the TV cable, and, in the background, some boulders on the local ridge. Taken toward the southwest.
AS11-40-5906 (OF300) ( 804k or 146k )
110:43:33 Down-Sun. Rightward of 5905.
AS11-40-5907 (OF300) ( 1029k or 188k )
110:43:33 Rightward of 5906. TV camera just left of center. The sharp-rimmed crater on the apparent horizon is centered in 5856, a frame from Buzz's plus-Z pan.
AS11-40-5907-08 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones and Yuri Krasilnikov.
AS11-40-5908 (OF300) ( 1100k or 221k )
110:43:33 Rightward of 5907. The blocks on the western rim of the nearly-rimless crater on the righthand side on the apparent horizon suggest that this crater is a West Crater secondary.
AS11-40-5908-09 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.1 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones and Yuri Krasilnikov.
AS11-40-5909 (OF300) ( 1332k or 280k )
110:43:33 Rightward of 5908. View toward north.
AS11-40-5909-10 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.5 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones and Yuri Krasilnikov.
AS11-40-5910 (OF300) ( 1446k or 320k )
110:43:33 Rightward of 5909.
AS11-40-5910-11 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones and Yuri Krasilnikov.
AS11-40-5911 (OF300) ( 1360k or 294k )
110:43:33 Rightward of 5910.
AS11-40-5912 (OF300) ( 1431k or 311k )
110:43:33 Rightward of 5911. Near-surface up-Sun.
AS11-40-5913 (OF300) ( 1190k or 256k )
110:43:33 Rightward of 5912. The tip of the minus-Z (east) probe is at the right edge.
AS11-40-5913-14 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones and Yuri Krasilnikov.
AS11-40-5914 (OF300) ( 1030k or 231k )
110:43:33 Rightward of 5913. Minus-Z strut and the northeast quadrant of the descent stage.
AS11-40-5914-15 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.8 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones and Yuri Krasilnikov.
AS11-40-5915 (OF300) ( 1125k or 249k )
110:43:33 Rightward of 5914. The MESA is in the shadowed area at right center with the rockbox on the right-front corner.
AS11-40-5916 (OF300) ( 888k or 183k )
110:43:33 Rightward of 5915. Neil has passed in front of Buzz, carrying the Gold camera. We can see the back of his suit and his legs but, unfortunately, there is no sign of the Gold camera in the image. The Solar Wind Collector is right of center.

Journal Contributor Rob South calls attention to the lighter-colored surface in the center foreground.

As we know from orbital photos, the area around the LM is scoured by the descent engine and that the scoured area has a higher albedo and, hence a lighter color. Once the astronauts get outside, they knock the soil around with their feet and restore the immediate area to something like its normal brightness. This can be seen quite dramatically in any number of post-EVA taken out the LM windows on A11 and the other missions and even in high-res details from Pan camera frames. When the astronauts work well away from the LM, they are on surfaces undisturbed by the descent engine and the soil they disturb does not have a noticeably different albedo from undisturbed soil.

The patch of lighter-colored soil in 5916 has been scoured by Eagle's descent engine but has not yet been disturbed by the crew.


Buzz takes twelve more LM inspection photos, 5917-26. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


AS11-40-5917 (OF300) ( 1210k or 271k )
110:47:18 Buzz still has the Hasselblad camera and is taking photographs while he does an inspection of the LM. This is a close-up of the north footpad, showing the buried probe. The triangular-shape imprint on the soil next to the footpad can also be seen in AS11-40- 5903 and appears to have been made by a cable or strap. My thanks to Journal Contributor Ken MacTaggart, who called attention to the imprint.
AS11-40-5918 (OF300) ( 1232k or 274k )
110:47:18 Close-up of plus-Y (north) footpad. Note the wind-swept appearance of the foreground soil, showing the effects of the Descent Engine plume.
AS11-40-5919 (OF300) ( 922k or 193k )
110:48:05 Close-up of the plus-Y strut from the northeast.
AS11-40-5920 (OF300) ( 1072k or 232k )
110:48:05 Close-up of the plus-Y (north) footpad from the east and a little south, with the Solar Wind Collector (SWC) to the right and, just to the left of the SWC, the TV camera. The U.S. flag is to the left of the strut, partially hidden by the strut support.
AS11-40-5921 (OF300) ( 1374k or 248k )
110:48:05 Buzz took this photo of the area under the Descent Stage to document the effects of the engine plume. A radial pattern of scouring is readily visible. Note the gouge made by the probe hanging down from the minus-Y (south) strut at contact. The fact that the spacecraft landed directly over this gouge mark is a clear indication that, as is discussed after 102:45:32, the LM was drifting left (south) during the final moments of the landing.
AS11-40-5922 (OF300) ( 806k or 194k )
110:48:05 View of the ascent stage from the northeast. Note the wrinkled surface of the RCS plume deflector and the warping of the rear of the ascent stage.
AS11-40-5923 (OF300) ( 361k or 76k )
110:50:26 View of Earth over the LM. As is discussed in the text, there is some uncertainty about who took these pictures of Earth. Australia is in sunlight on the left side of the Earth image which, as Journal Contributor Markus Mehring notes, confirms the obvious since the EVA video came thru Honeysuckle Creek and Parkes. Compare with a Stellarium view of Earth from Tranquility Base at 110:50:26, created by Journal Contributor Syd Buxton.
AS11-40-5924 (OF300) ( 509k or 119k )
110:50:26 Earth over the LM, taken from a spot near the minus-Z (east) footpad. syd Buxton has provided a detail.
AS11-40-5925 (OF300) ( 1328k or 302k )
110:51:29 Photo of the east footpad. Note the difference in materials used to cover the footpad on the engine-facing surfaces as compared with the outer surfaces.
AS11-40-5926 (OF300) ( 1211k or 276k )
110:51:29 LM east footpad close-up. At landing, the LM weight was about 16,000 terrestrial pounds. In the lunar gravity field, therefore, each of the four footpads is bearing a weight of about 670 pounds or 300 kilograms. There is a buildup of soil on the south side, indicating that the spacecraft was moving in that direction at touchdown. Otherwise, the footpad did not make much of an impression.


Neil took the remaining EVA photos: 5927 to 5970.


Neil takes three photos documenting the EASEP offload, 5927-29. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


AS11-40-5927 (OF300) ( 876k or 171k )

110:53:38. Neil now has the Hasselblad. Buzz is preparing to remove the passive seismometer from the lefthand compartment in the SEQ bay. The LRRR is in the righthand compartment. The bay is between the east and south struts and has two doors: a vertically-hinged door at Buzz's left and a horizontally-hinged door which can be seen above the right side of the bay. Buzz pulled on a pulley-mounted tape to raise the latter door. The tape is visible to his right, draped over the support for the minus-Z (east) strut. Diagrams on page 58 of Scott Sullivan's Virtual LM illustrate the way the main door is hinged. Additonal details can be found on pages 38 to 47. To the right of Buzz, and underneath the Descent Stage is a shield to protect the landing radar from the heat of the Descent Engine.

Note the object next to the minus-Z (east) strut. As noted by Journal Contributor Markus Mehring, at the end of Buzz's transmission at 110:52:20 when he says "gradual sideways hops", we see him working at the SEQ Bay and discarding the object to his right. As noted above, the object ends up next to the minus-Z east strut. Contributor Paul Fjeld writes that the discarded object is ":a small sheet of 5-mil, aluminized Kapton with two little handles that covered the door-deployment tapes."]

"There was a similar 5-mil sheet that covered the S-band deployable antenna on Quad 1. The new scans of mag S (from original film in 2004) show the detail of the Quad 1 installation really well. You can see a single handle on the left-bottom part of the quad near the downlock latch shield (little white rectangle) and I can even convince myself that I can make out the little 'fingers' that held the blanket on (with tape to hold them). The astronaut yanked the handle(s) revealing deployment lanyards velcroed inside which pulled out the two 'Antenna Release Pins', the label of which we can now read thanks to Kipp's good work. I re-did the LM-13 blanket at the Cradle Museum after I saw those shots (thanks Kipp!).".

AS11-40-5927/9 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3.4Mb or 288k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erik van Meijgaarden. Photogrammetric analysis by Vlad Pustynski shows that all three photos were taken from virtually the same location.
AS11-40-5928 (OF300) ( 716k or 154k )
110:53:38 Buzz is pulling the passive seismometer from the lefthand compartment in the SEQ bay. Erik van Meijgaarden has extended our view to the right with part of 5929 to create a mini-pan.
AS11-40-5929 (OF300) ( 993k or 208k )
110:53:38. Buzz is draping a pulley tape over the lefthand door.


Neil takes pan 4, consisting of twelve photos, 5930-41. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


AS11-40-5930 (OF300) ( 771k or 126k )
110:55:49. Neil has backed away from the LM to take a panorama. This down-Sun shows the bright halo - possibly a diffraction effect - that appeared around the shadow of Neil's helmet. Note, also, how washed out the scene is along the line of his shadow. This effect is due to the fact that, in this direction, all of the shadows - excepting only those cast by objects in the immediate foreground - are hidden by the objects that cast them. In addition, there are also strong reflections off the soil particles which also contribute to the visual washout. The double crater below Neil's LM window is in the middle distance.
AS11-40-5930/1 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.1 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Yuri Krasilnikov and Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5931 (OF300) ( 1001k or 218k )
110:55:49. Rightward of 5930. In this second photo from Neil's minus-Z (east) pan, Buzz has removed the passive seismometer package from the SEQ bay. The foreground object with the handle is the Gold camera, designed to take close-up photographs of the very top layer of the lunar soil. Note, also, the split rock at the right edge, just below the center of the photograph. This boulder was probably ejected from a nearby impact, possibly West Crater, and broke into two pieces when it hit. A different boulder, just to the left of center near the tip of the LM shadow in 5883, appears to have suffered a similar fate.
AS11-40-5931/2 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Yuri Krasilnikov and Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5932 (OF300) ( 838k or 177k )
110:55:49. Rightward of 5931, with good overlap. The split boulder is at the lower left. Note the relative darkness of the areas disturbed by the crew at the center of the photograph.
AS11-40-5932/3 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Yuri Krasilnikov and Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5933 (OF300) ( 1150k or 237k )
110:55:49. Rightward of 5932.
AS11-40-5933/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Yuri Krasilnikov and Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5934 (OF300) ( 1121k or 223k )
110:55:49. Rightward of 5933. View toward the northwest.
AS11-40-5935 (OF300) ( 750k or 136k )
110:55:49. Rightward of 5934. Most of the rocks on the left and within a few tens of meters of the LM and are relatively small. As shown in a detail, the northern part of Little West Crater can be seen in the sun glare above center.
AS11-40-5936 (OF300) ( 970k or 191k )
110:55:49. Rightward of 5935 but without overlap because Neil has avoided the up-Sun view. The southern part of Little West Crater on the lefthand side of the image. Part of the rim of West Crater can be seen faintly just above center. We can locate the approximate azimuths of the north and South rims of West Crater from Figure 3-15 ( 196 k ) in the Apollo 11 Preliminary Science Report and a detail from the USGS site map.

As indicated in Figure 3-15 ( 280k ), Neil took the minus-Z pan from a location about 20 meters roughly southeast of the LM. The exact location has been added to the inset at the upper right, which shows that Neil was about 55 meters due west of the south rim of Little West Crater. From the site map detail we see that, from the south rim of Little West Crater, the north rim of West Crater is about 460 meters away on an azimuth of about 92.7 degrees. With the help of a little trigonometry, this information gives an azimuth of the north rim of West Crater from Neil's location of 92.4 degrees, with the south rim azimuth being about 112.4 degrees. During the Apollo 11 EVA, the solar azimuth was 88.1 degrees, which allows us to plot the relevant azimuths on a detail from 5936. The plotted azimuth for the south rim is very close to the lefthand edge of the horizon feature that is obviously a partly shadowed portion of the rim while the plotted north rim azimuth is close to the righthand edge of what is probably a sunlit, rock-strewn portion of the rim.

AS11-40-5937 (OF300) ( 1092k or 244k )
110:55:49. Rightward of 5936.
AS11-40-5937/8 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Yuri Krasilnikov and Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5938 (OF300) ( 995k or 222k )
110:55:49. Rightward of 5937.
AS11-40-5938/9 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.1 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Yuri Krasilnikov and Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5939 (OF300) ( 925k or 199k )
110:55:49. Rightward of 5939. View to the south.
AS11-40-5939-40 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Yuri Krasilnikov and Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5940 (OF300) ( 746k or 153k )
110:55:49. Rightward of 5939. View to the south. Note the rounded crater rim on the horizon just to the left of center.
AS11-40-5940-41 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Yuri Krasilnikov and Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5941 (OF300) ( 663k or 126k )
110:55:49. Rightward of 5940. This down-Sun is the final frame in Neil's pan.


Neil takes twelve photos of the EASEP deployment, 5942-53. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


AS11-40-5942 (OF300) ( 870k or 191k )
110:58:16. This photograph is the first in a sequence of pictures Neil took of Buzz carrying the EASEP out to the deployment site a short way south of the spacecraft. In this picture, he is walking across the raised rim of the small crater he comments on at 110:58:16. Note the spray of dust spreading out in front of his left boot. The piece of equipment in his right hand is the LRRR, while the seismometer package is in his left hand. Note that, in this view from behind Buzz, we are seeing his OPS antenna edge on. In lower-quality scans and prints, it all but disappears. A detail shows the two columns of horizontal Velcro strips on the back of his PLSS.
AS11-40-5943 (OF300) ( 939k or 207k )
110:58:24. Buzz has gone beyond the small crater and is looking for a flat spot on which to put the LRRR. Note the depth of the footprints he has left in the soft rim of the crater. Beyond the crater, where he is standing at this moment, his footprints are only a fraction of an inch deep and are more typical of the footprints that he and Neil normally leave. Note that Buzz has just walked between some rounded, partially-buried boulders, which he mentions at 110:58:24. This picture is the first of a stereopair Neil takes of them.
AS11-40-5944 (OF300) ( 980k or 210k )
110:58:24. Neil has stepped to his left to get a stereo companion to 5943. Note the build up of soil on the base of these boulders due to ejecta from the foreground crater. Note that there is another split boulder in this photograph, to Buzz's right. From 5948, we know that Buzz will put the LRRR down northwest of this boulder and the seismometer southeast of it. This means that at some point after 5944, Buzz will move about 10 meters (30 feet) to his right. Figure 3-16 ( 196k re-draft by Thomas Schwagmeier) in the Apollo 11 Preliminary Science Report shows his path from the SEQ Bay out to the deployment area.
AS11-40-5945 (OF300) ( 936k or 207k )
110:59:28 Buzz has put the LRRR down on the surface and has turned to his left to find a spot for the seismometer.
AS11-40-5946 (OF300) ( 1052k or 223k )
111:04:56 Buzz has placed the seismometer package on the surface and is using a built-in maneuvering handle to adjust the pointing and leveling. Note the dirt that he has pushed out of the way on the south side of the package in his attempt to get it level. Note, also, that the eastern rim of the double crater under Neil's LM window can be seen at the left edge of this photograph. The Gold camera is to the right of Buzz and the LRRR is to the left of him with the TV camera beyond.
AS11-40-5947 (OF300) ( 1226k or 247k )
111:06:20 Buzz may still be trying to get the seismometer leveled. As he tells Houston, the west side solar array "deployed automatically". He has not yet deployed the east side solar array. Note the baton-like transmitting antenna and the three-pronged (cricket wicket) gnomon on the top of the main package. There are two release pins on the ground about 1 - 2 meters to the right of Buzz's feet and other pieces of discarded hardware nearby. Note the closed configuration of the SEQ Bay doors on the LM descent stage. The 'Gold' camera is between Buzz and the spacecraft.
AS11-40-5948 (OF300) ( 219k or 1096k )
Neil took this picture at about 111:06:34. Buzz has now deployed both the east and west solar panels on the seismometer. He is looking toward the LM, perhaps to get a reference for his alignment. A labelled drawing of the PSEP includes dimenions provided by Allan Needell of the National Air and Space Museum.
AS11-40-5949 (OF300) ( 268k or 1245k )
111:06:34 Neil took this picture not long after taking 5948. Photogrammetric analysis indicates that he moved about 3.2 meters to his left between frames and this may be the moment when he goes out of the TV field-of-view. This picture gives us a good view of the split boulder that is between the two experiments. In the background, we can see the LM, the U.S. flag, and the TV camera. Note the footprints at the lower right. The astronaut who made them seems to have been moving from right to left. The rightmost footprint made with his left boot has a very deep toe imprint while the rightmost imprint made by his right boot is relatively flat and uniform. While bringing his left foot forward for the next step, he seems to have been dragging his heel, a clear indication that he was walking flat-foot, rather then hopping or running. The next left-boot toe print is deep while above it, we see that he was also scuffing his right heel along the surface. Note that the next prints made by both boots indicate that he turned to his right.
AS11-40-5950 (OF300) ( 252k or 1196k )
111:06:34 Similar to 5949 and taken from virtually the same spot. Buzz's shadow is falling on the split boulder.
AS11-40-5951 (OF300) ( 330k or 1654k )
111:06:34 Buzz may still be trying to get the seismometer leveled. Harald Kucharek notes that, through the visor, we can see Buzz face and suggests that he is looking over at Neil. See a detail ( 128k ).
AS11-40-5952 (OF300) ( 322k or 1495k )
111:07:40 Post-deployment documentation photo of the LRRR with the stereo camera perched on a flat-topped rock in the background. As of December 2010, the retroreflectors were still being used in conjunction with a dedicated facility at the MacDondald Observatory in Texas. In a labeled version of AS11-37-5549, Journal Contributor Vlad Pustynski has identified the boulder where Neil put the stereo camera while he deployed the LRRR and took documentation photos. After he and Buzz completed their EASEP activities, Neil grabbed the stereo camera and took it with him when he ran out to Little West Crater to take an unscheduled partial pan. Vlad also calls attention to a discarded fitting to the right of the LRRR. During training, this fitting came to be known as the "hockey stick"
AS11-40-5953 (OF300) ( 190k or 1078k)
111:09:43 Close-up of the seismometer leveling device. Poor focus.


Neil takes pan 5, consisting of eight photos, 5954-61, and one more on the way back to the LM. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


AS11-40-5954 (OF300) ( 183k or 1022k)
111:11:31. Neil has run about 60 meters east of the LM to look at Little West Crater. The crater is about 30 meters in diameter and Neil is taking a partial pan from the WSW rim. This is the first frame of that pan. It shows the north and east wall and a pile of debris in the bottom. The Gold camera, which Neil has brought out with him, is at the left. Markus Mehring notes that the flat dome on the horizon near the left edge may be a rim segment in the distinctive cluster of craters just outside the landing ellipse to the north. See the discussion following 107:05:31.
AS11-40-5954-56 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.6 Mb)
Anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5955 (OF300) ( 207k or 1145k)
111:11:31. Rightward of 5954. Note the fractured, angular blocks in the bottom of the crater.
AS11-40-5956 (OF300) ( 210k or 1093k)
111:11:31. Leftward of 5955 and taken from a point farther to Neil's right from the place where he took 5954.
AS11-40-5957 (OF300) ( 203k or 1027k )
111:11:31. Leftward of 5956.
AS11-40-5957/8 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 838k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Ulli Lotzmann.

Eric Nelson has created an alternative anaglyph ( 399k ) with greater emphasis on vertical relief.

AS11-40-5958 (OF300) ( 201k or 969k )
111:11:31. We don't know if Neil purposefully changed position to take a stereopair, but he had stepped to his right after taking 5957.
AS11-40-5958/9 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3.6 Mb or 0.4Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS11-40-5959 (OF300) ( 191k or 913k )
111:11:31. Similar to 5958 but taken from half a step left.
AS11-40-5960 (OF300) ( 175k or 827k )
111:11:31. Leftward of 5959.
AS11-40-5961 (OF300) ( 148k or 706k )
111:11:31. Leftward of 5960. Down-Sun photograph of the LM from the rim of Little West Crater. We can see Neil's shadow and the shadow of the Gold camera. Note that the doors of the SEQ bay are closed. This frame gives us a feeling for elevation of the rim. When he took this picture, Neil was clearly standing above the level of the LM footpads. Note the darkened tracks leading leftward to the EASEP deployment area and rightward to the TV camera. Compare with the LPI traverse map ( 1.32Mb ). Buzz is at the MESA on the far, righthand side of the spacecraft.
AS11-40-5962 (OF300) ( 104k or 529k )
Down-Sun photograph of the LM taken by Neil during his return from the rim of Little West Crater. The split boulder noted on the righhand edge of 5931 is in the foreground in line with the south (minus-Y) footpad. Buzz is still at the MESA.


Neil takes two photos of Buzz collecting the core samples, 5963-64; and then six incidental photos, 5965-70 to advance the film before removing the magazine. Thumbnails by Joe O'Dea.


AS11-40-5963 (OF300) ( 218k or 962k )
111:15:13 Buzz attempting to drive the first of two on a core tubes into the surface. He was only able to get it in about 20 cm (8 inches). The Solar Wind Collector is just beyond the core tube and the TV camera is at the extreme left. Buzz's feedwater controls can be seen on the front, right hand corner of the bottom of his PLSS, as shown in a detail. Note the carabiner (hook) attached to the neckring tiedown strap hanging at the front of his suit. Note that areas where Neil and Buzz have disturbed and scattered soil are darker than undisturbed areas.
AS11-40-5963/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1419k or 320k )
Although Neil turned slightly to his left between the two frames, that turn did not produce any appreciable stereo displacment of, for example, the SWC relative a rock beyond it on the local horizon. The only significant stereo in the anaglyph is due to the fact that Buzz moved between the frames. Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-40-5964 (OF300) ( 244k or 1096k )
111:15:13 Buzz has just struck a glancing blow on the top of the extension handle which, in turn, is attached to the top of the core tube. He is using the flat of the hammer.


Before removing the film magazine from the Hasselblad for transport by LEC up to the cabin, Neil advances the film by seven frames to avoid getting any of the EVA images sunstruck.


AS11-40-5965 ( 94k )
111:27:05 This image is either the first of those film advances or an accicental frame taking while Neil was getting ready to advance the film. It gives a view to the southeast, with some deeply shadowed Mylar - possibly part of the MESA blanket - on the left. On the surface, we see the parallel shadows of the minus-Y (south) strut and probe. Compare with 5850.
AS11-40-5966 ( 113k )
111:27:05 Similar to 5965.
AS11-40-5966A ( 160k )
111:27:05 View into the MESA shadow. Image enhanced to show detail similar to that seen in the deep shadow of 5965 and 5966. Thanks to Paolo Attivissimo for callling attention to the existence of this image. Scan downloaded from the LPI Apollo Image Atlas.]
AS11-40-5967 (OF300) ( 185k or 1088k )
111:27:05 Image taken as Neil advances the film prior to removing the magazine. View to the northwest showing the TV camera and the SWC pole. Andrew Vignaux suggests that the fuzzy area at the lower left is part of Neil's suit - probably Neil's left arm - which, because it is so close to the camera, is out of focus.
AS11-40-5967/8 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 943k or 228k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-40-5968 (OF300) ( 185k or 1088k )
111:27:05 Similar to 5967.
AS11-40-5969 (OF300) ( 126k or 910k )
111:27:05 This frame captures more of Neil's suit.
AS11-40-5970 (OF300) ( 133k )
111:27:05 Similar to 5969. Sunstruck after the magazine was removed from the camera. The blocky object at the top of the "suit" may be Neil's OPS, as indicated in a labeled detail.

Magazine 41/P (B & W) Frames 5971-6159

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 0.7 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

Magazine 41 was used in lunar orbit.


AS11-41-6121 ( 158k or 771k )
Craters Sabine and Ritter from lunar orbit. Scans by Kipp Teague.
AS11-41-6156 ( 158k or 890k )
View of area west of Crater 308 from lunar orbit. Scans by Kipp Teague.

Magazine 42/U (B & W) Frames 6160-6348

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 0.7 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

Magazine 42 was used in lunar orbit.


AS11-42-6304 ( 2.9 Mb )
Messier Crater (left) and Messier A. Messier was probbly formed by an impactor which struck the Moon at a very shallow angle. Messier is located at 47.6 E and 1.9 S and is about 9 x 11 km and 1.3 km deep. Scan downloaded from the LPI Apollo Image Atlas.
AS11-42-6304-05 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Patrick Vantuyne.
AS11-42-6305 ( 3.0 Mb )
Scan downloaded from the LPI Apollo Image Atlas.

Magazine 43/T (B & W) Frames 6349-6539

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 0.7 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

Magazine 43 was used in lunar orbit.


AS11-43-6437 ( 185k )
Mendeleev Crater, located at 140.9 E and 5.7 N. Diameter 313 km. Part of the northern rim of Mendeleev is on the left. The fresh crater at top center is Richards, located at 1401 E and 7.7 N. Diameter 16 km. The crater chain ends just below Richards is Catena Mendeleev. Scan downloaded from the LPI Apollo Image Atlas.
AS11-43-6437-39 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3 Mb or 240k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Patrick Vantuyne.
AS11-43-6439 (OF300) ( 2.8 Mb )
Similar to 6437. Scan downloaded from the LPI Apollo Image Atlas.

Magazine 44/V (Color) Frames 6540-6696

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 0.7 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

Magazine 44 was used in lunar orbit and during transearth coast.

Paul White has produced an animated gif of Earthrise from frames 6547-64 ( 1.2 Mb ).

Much of the caption material below comes from the Apollo 11 Flight Journal by David Woods, Ken MacTaggart, and Frank O'Brien.


Frames 6540-46 show the lunar surface and were taken with an 80-mm lens.


AS11-44-6540 (OF300) ( 0.6Mb )

Housing of LM propellant tank in the foreground. Western rim of King Crater, but out of focus. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6541 (OF300) ( 0.6Mb )
LM thrusters in good focus. King Crater. The lunar surface is out of focus. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6542 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )
LM thrusters, KingCrater. Neither is in focus. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6543 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
Lunar surface in focus. Kiing Crater to the right of the thrusters. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6544 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )
Crater Lobachevsky cut off on left. Bingham lower left and Bingham H lower centre. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6545 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )
Crater Lobachevsky centre. Bingham lower right. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6546 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )
Crater Firsov T lower left and Firsov K beyond. Scan by NASA Johnson.

Frames 6547-64 show Earthrise and were taken with a 250-mm lens.


AS11-44-6547 (OF300) ( 33k or 619k )

View of the Earthrise from the Command Module Columbia. This picture was taken shortly after Earthrise as Columbia was passing over Mare Smythii. In looking at Earth, Australia is at the left, just above the lunar horizon. 20 July 1969. Scan by NASA Johnson.

Journal Contributor Paul White has made detailed comparisons of cloud patterns seen in a large number of Apollo images with imagery taken at close to the same time by various meteorlogical satellites.

AS11-44-6548 (OF300) ( 68k or 640k )
Taken seconds after 6547. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6549 (OF300) ( 68k or 624k )
View of the Earth from the Command Module Columbia. at AOS. The sequence of images indicate that 6549 has to have been taken before separation from the LM, which happened on Rev 12. Journal Contributor Scott Cruickshank notes that, using Celestia, the position of Australia indicates that 6549 was taken soon after AOS on Rev 6, which occurred at about 04:03 UTC on 20 July 1969. A Celestia view of Earth from the Moon at that time provides confirmation . As seen from the Moon, the angular diameter of Earth is about 1.9 degrees. Between the times that 6547 and 6549 are taken, the Earth rises about 0.37 diameters or about 0.7 degrees and, with an orbital period of two hours, the interval between 6547 and 6549 can be estimated as 14 seconds. 20 July 1969. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6550 (OF300) ( 200k or 648k )
Earthrise. Mick Hyde notes that the portion of Mare Smythii seen in this image can also be seen in Clementine image bi03n087, which can also be found on the WWW via the Clementine Image Browser. Markus Mehring provides a labeled comparison between the two images. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6551 (OF300) ( 82k or 481k )
Earthrise. Detailed captions available in the Apollo 11 Flight Journal. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6553 (OF300) ( 68k or 632k )
Earthrise. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6554 (OF300) ( 64k or 704k )
Earthrise. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6555 (OF300) ( 68k or 712k )
Earthrise. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6556 (OF300) ( 68k or 704k )
Earthrise. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6557 (OF300) ( 68k or 612k )
Earthrise. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6558 (OF300) ( 64k or 592k )
Earthrise. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6559 (OF300) ( 64k or 564k )
Earthrise. Since 6547 was taken, the Earth has risen about about 1.8 diameters or 3.4 degrees. The time interval is about 68 seconds. The average interval between frames is about 5 seconds. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6560 (OF300) ( 60k or 532k )
Earthrise. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6561 (OF300) ( 64k or 580k )
Earthrise. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6562 (OF300) ( 68k or 600k )
Earthrise. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6563 (OF300) ( 56k or 476k )
Earthrise. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6564 (OF300) ( 56k or 464k )
Earthrise. Scan by NASA Johnson.

Although the Apollo 11 Photography Index states that frames 6565 to 6599 were also taken with the 250-mm lens, the size of the thruster images in 6565 are similar to those is 6542, suggesting that Mike is using the 80-mm lens for this sequence.


AS11-44-6565 (OF300) ( 56k or 648k )

Photos of the LM pulling away during separation. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6566 (OF300) ( 64k or 492k )
Photos of the LM pulling away during separation. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6567 (OF300) ( 68k or 544k )
Photos of the LM pulling away during separation. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6568 (OF300) ( 72k or 1.1Mb )
Photos of the LM pulling away during separation. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6569 (OF300) ( 56k or 0.8Mb )
Photos of the LM pulling away during separation. Plus-Z strut with ladder and porch visible. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6570 (OF300) ( 0.6Mb )
Photos of the LM pulling away during separation. The rendezvous radar is now visible and is pointing down, toward the porch. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6571 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
Photos of the LM pulling away during separation. Minus-Y footpad coming into view. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6572 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )
Photos of the LM pulling away during separation. Mike shifts his aim and gets both the plus-Z and plus-Y struts and footpads. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6573 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )
Photos of the LM pulling away during separation. Oblique view of the bottom of the descent stage. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6574 (OF300) ( 0.6Mb )
View of the front of the LM, excepting only the rendezvous radar and some other gear on the top. Mike Collins has begun a visual inspection of the Lunar Module, and is verifying that the landing gear is down and locked.

An evolution in the LM's design is also apparent. The RCS plume deflectors, mounted on the Descent Stage underneath each RCS quad, were added to prevent the thermal damage observed on the Apollo 9 LM. Compare this photograph with that of the Apollo 10 LM ( AS10-34-5085 ), which was flown without plume deflectors. Scan by NASA Johnson.

AS11-44-6575 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )
Similar to 6575. Neil has begun a slow yaw maneuver to his right. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-43-6575-6 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.8 Mb or 0.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Patrick Vantuyne. "Had to do some minor 'Adobe' adjustments, on the original pictures, to make it look like this"
AS11-44-6576 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb )
Similar to 6575 with the LM yawed futher right. The increased separation gives us a full view of the LM. Note that the rendezvous radar orientation had changed since Mike took 6570. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6577 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb )
Similar to 6576 with additional yaw. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6578 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb )
Significant change in rendezvous radar orientation. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6579 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb )
LM from the Command Module after undocking. Right yaw continues. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6580 (OF300) ( 1.1Mb )
LM from the Command Module after undocking. Right yaw continues. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6581 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb )
LM from the Command Module after undocking. Right yaw continues. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6582 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb )
LM from the Command Module after undocking. Right yaw continues. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6583 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb )
LM from the Command Module after undocking. Right yaw continues, with the back of the LM visible. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6584 (OF300) ( 1.1Mb )
LM from the Command Module after undocking. The ladder strut in on Mike's right. There has been sufficent roll that the bottom on the LM is no longer visible. We are looking at Buzz's side of the LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6585 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb )
Similar to 6584. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6586 (OF300) ( 1.2Mb )
View of the front of the LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6587 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )
Similar to 6586 but from a greater distance. First in a series at about the same separation. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6588 (OF300) ( 1.3Mb )
Similar to 6587. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6589 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
View of the front of the LM similar to the previous shots but with a sharper image. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6590 (OF300) ( 1.4Mb )
Front of the LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6591 (OF300) ( 1.3Mb )
Front of the LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6592 (OF300) ( 1.3Mb )
Front of the LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6592-93 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Patrick Vantuyne.
AS11-44-6593 (OF300) ( 0.5Mb )
Front of the LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6594 (OF300) ( 0.5Mb )
Front of the LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6595 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )
Front of the LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6596 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )
Front of the LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6597 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )
Front of the LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6598 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )
Front of the LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6599 (OF300) ( 0.6Mb )
LM at greater distance. Scan by NASA Johnson.

The Apollo 11 Photography Index indicates that 6600-6605 were taken with the 80-mm lens, which is correct.


AS11-44-6600 (OF300) ( 0.6Mb )

Similar to 6599 but with better centering. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6601 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
Earthrise over Mare Smythii. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6602 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )
Earthrise. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6603 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )
Earthrise. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6604 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )
Earthrise. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6605 (OF300) ( 1.1Mb )
Earthrise. Scan by NASA Johnson.

Frames 6606-20 show lunar surface features and were taken with the 250-mm lens. The captions are from the Apollo 11 Flight Journal.


AS11-44-6606 (OF300) ( 1.2Mb )

Shadowed crater Icarus in foreground with central peak lit by setting Sun. View south towards Amici T. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6607 (OF300) ( 1.5Mb )
Area north of crater Icarus. Coordinates of image centre are 2.22S, 174.08W. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6608 (OF300) ( 1.3Mb )
Crater Daedalus G near centre of frame. Daedalus is cut off at edge of image. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6609 (OF300) ( 1.5Mb )
Crater Daedalus and Daedalus B in front. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6610 (OF300) ( 1.4Mb )
View south across the area east of crater Daedalus. Icarus V is deeply shadowed crater in foreground. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6611 (OF300) ( 1.5Mb )
Crater Daedalus and Daedalus B in front. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6612 (OF300) ( 1.5Mb )
Crater Daedalus W with Daedalus cut off beyond. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6613 (OF300) ( 1.3Mb )
View south across landscape west of crater Daedalus. Daedalus W cut off in foreground. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6614 (OF300) ( 1.1Mb )
View south across landscape west of crater Daedalus. Daedalus U in foreground and Daedalus R in middle distance. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6615 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
View west across Mare Fecunditatis. Crater pair Messier and Messier A and its ray system near centre. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6616 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )
View west across northern Mare Fecunditatis. Crater pair Messier and Messier A and its ray system at edge of frame. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6617 (OF300) ( 0.6Mb )
View west across southern Mare Tranquilitatis. Crater Maskelyne, the large crater right of center in mare. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6618 (OF300) ( 0.6Mb )
View west across southern Mare Tranquilitatis. Crater Maskelyne in mare. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6619 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb)
Southern Mare Tranquilitatis and crater Maskelyne. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6620 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb)
View west across southern Mare Tranquilitatis. Crater Maskelyne in right foreground. Scan by NASA Johnson.

Frames 6621-43 were taken during rendezvous with the 80-mm lens.



Rendezvous animation ( 0.7Mb anim. gif or 4.6Mb anim. gif or 3.1Mb mov)
Animation by Tom Stohlman.

AS11-44-6621 (OF300) (1.0Mb)

LM approaching CSM at rendezvous. The LM gets closer with each successive frame. Crater Saha D on left, Al-Khwarizmi M is light-coloured crater on right. LM against Saha C. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6622 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb)
LM approaching CSM at rendezvous. The LM gets closer with each successive frame. Crater Saha D on left, Al-Khwarizmi M is light-coloured crater on right. LM against Saha C. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6623 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb)
LM approaching CSM at rendezvous. The LM gets closer with each successive frame. Crater Saha D on left. LM against western rim of Saha C. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6624 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb)
LM approaching CSM at rendezvous. The LM gets closer with each successive frame. Crater Saha C cut off in foreground. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6625 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb)
LM approaching CSM at rendezvous. The LM gets closer with each successive frame. Crater Saha B just beyond LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6626 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb )
LM approaching CSM at rendezvous. The LM gets closer with each successive frame. LM against crater Saha B. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6627 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
LM approaching CSM at rendezvous. The LM gets closer with each successive frame. Saenger P and Saenger Q beyond LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6628 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
LM approaching CSM at rendezvous. The LM gets closer with each successive frame. Saenger P right of LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6629 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
LM approaching CSM at rendezvous. The LM gets closer with each successive frame. LM between Wyld C and Saenger P. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6630 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
LM approaching CSM at rendezvous. The LM still getting closer with each successive frame. LM rendezvous. Fox A beyond and left of LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6631 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
LM approaching CSM at rendezvous. The LM still getting closer with each successive frame. LM appears next to crater Fox. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6632 (OF300) ( 1.1Mb )
At 127:51:36, Mike reports Earthrise. At 127:52:05, Neil tells Houston that the two spacecraft are "station-keeping". LM is only slightly closer than it was in 6631. Crater Fox and Fox A visible below LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6633 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
Earth. Front of the LM. No change in separation of the two vehicles. the LM moves around from image to image, but only because Mike is taking handheld photos. Babcock cut off by CM window frame. Mare Smythii beyond. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6634 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )
Earth. Front of the LM. Station keeping. Babcock cut off by CM window frame. Mare Smythii beyond. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6635 (OF300) ( 0.6Mb )
Earth. Front of the LM. Note that, starting with this frame and continuing to 6643, Neil slowly rotates the LM to get in the correct "roll" attitude" for docking. From Neil's perspective, he is rolling to the left. This starts at about 127:54:11. Babcock cut off by CM window frame. Mare Smythii beyond. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6636 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )
Earth. Front of the LM. Adjusting LM roll. Babcock cut off by CM window frame. Mare Smythii beyond. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6637 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
Earth. Front of the LM. Adjusting LM roll. Babcock cut off by CM window frame. Mare Smythii beyond. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6638 (OF300) ( 0.5Mb )
Earth. Front of the LM. Adjusting LM roll. Babcock cut off by CM window frame. Mare Smythii beyond. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6639 (OF300) ( 1.2Mb )
Earth. Front of the LM. Adjusting LM roll. Babcock cut off by CM window frame. Mare Smythii beyond. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6640 (OF300) ( 0.6Mb )
Earth. Front of the LM. Adjusting LM roll. Mare Smythii beyond LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6641 (OF300) ( 0.6Mb )
Earth. Front of the LM. Adjusting LM roll. Mare Smythii beyond LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6642 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )
Earth. Front of the LM. Adjusting LM roll. Mare Smythii beyond LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6643 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
Earth. Front of the LM. Adjusting LM roll. Mare Smythii beyond LM. Scan by NASA Johnson.

Frames 6644-46 were taken in lunar orbit with the 80-mm lens; agree with Index


AS11-44-6644 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )

Crater Firsov and Firsov V below centre, Al-Khwarizmi beyond above centre. Lobachevsky cut off on right. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6645 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )
Earthrise. Bright crater in foreground is Al-Khwarizmi K. Mare Smythii and Mare Marginis on horizon. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6646 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )
Earthrise. Bright crater in foreground is Al-Khwarizmi K. Mare Smythii and Mare Marginis on horizon. Scan by NASA Johnson.

Frames 6647-52 were taken in lunar orbit with the 250-mm lens; agree with Index


AS11-44-6647 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )

View west over Mare Smythii. Babcock is cut off on right. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6648 (OF300) ( 0.5Mb )
Earthrise over Mare Smythii. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6649 (OF300) ( 0.5Mb )
Earthrise over Mare Smythii. Dark-floored crater Neper on right. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6650 (OF300) ( 0.6Mb )
Earthrise over Mare Smythii. Dark-floored crater Neper on right. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6651 (OF300) ( 0.5Mb )
Earthrise over Mare Smythii. Dark-floored crater Neper on right. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6652 (OF300) ( 0.5Mb )
Earthrise over Mare Smythii. Dark-floored crater Neper on right. Scan by NASA Johnson.

Frames 6653-6667 show the Moon during TransEarth Coast. Some were taken with the 80-mm lens; the rest with the 250-mm lens.


AS11-44-6653 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )

Taken with an 80-mm lens. Earthrise over Mare Smythii and Mare Marginis. Neper is the dark-floored crater between. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6654 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb )
Taken with a 250-mm lens. Wide view of eastern limb area. Crater Saenger P at centre of frame. Eastern edge of Mare Smythii on left. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6655 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb )
Taken with a 250-mm lens. Bright crater at centre of image is Al-Khwarizmi K. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6656 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens. Moon after TEI. View north to rayed crater Giordano Bruno. Dark-floored crater on left is Lomonosov and Joliot on extreme left. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6657 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens. Moon after TEI. View southeast to crater Tsiolkovsky. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6658 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens. Moon after TEI. View southeast. Crater King on lower right. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6659 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens. Moon after TEI. View southeast. Crater King on lower right. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6660 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens. Moon after TEI. View north to rayed crater Giordano Bruno. Dark-floored crater on left is Lomonosov and Joliot is cut off on extreme left. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6661 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb )
Taken with a 250-mm lens. Moon after TEI. Mare Crisium left of centre. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6662 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb )
Taken with a 250-mm lens. Mare Crisium left of centre. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6663 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb )
Taken with a 250-mm lens. Mare Crisium left of centre. Shape against black is reflection of internal fluorescent lamp. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6664 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
Taken with a 250-mm lens. Mare Crisium left of centre. Shape against black is reflection of internal fluorescent lamp. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6665 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
Taken with a 250-mm lens. Mare Crisium left of centre. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6666 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
Taken with a 250-mm lens. Mare Crisium left of centre. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6667 (OF300) ( 1.0Mb )
Taken with a 250-mm lens. Mare Crisium left of centre. Scan by NASA Johnson.

Frames 6668-6696 show Earth during TransEarth Coast. 6676-6689 were taken with an 80-mm lens; the rest with a 250-mm lens. 6668-6682 have North down.

Journal Contributor Paul White has made detailed comparisons of cloud patterns seen in a large number of Apollo images with imagery taken at close to the same time by various meteorlogical satellites.


AS11-44-6668 (OF300) ( 0.2Mb )

Taken with a 250-mm lens. Half Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6669 (OF300) ( 0.3Mb )
Taken with a 250-mm lens. Half Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6670 (OF300) ( 0.2Mb )
Taken with a 250-mm lens. Half Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6671 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )
Taken with a 250-mm lens. Half Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6672 (OF300) ( 0.6Mb )
Taken with a 250-mm lens. Half Earth with north at the lower right. North Africa and the Iberian peninsula are prominent. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6673 (OF300) ( 0.2Mb )
Similar to 6672 but rotated to north down. Taken with a 250-mm lens.. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6674 (OF300) ( 0.6Mb )
Taken with a 250-mm lens. Half Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6675 (OF300) ( 0.3Mb )
Taken with a 250-mm lens. Half Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6676 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens, crescent Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6677 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens, crescent Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6678 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens, crescent Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6679 (OF300) ( 0.4Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens, crescent Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6680 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens, crescent Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6681 (OF300) ( 0.4Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens, crescent Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6682 (OF300) ( 0.5Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens, crescent Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6683 (OF300) ( 0.5Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens, crescent Earth with north on the left. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6684 (OF300) ( 0.6Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens, crescent Earth with north on the left. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6685 (OF300) ( 0.5Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens, crescent Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6686 (OF300) ( 0.5Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens, crescent Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6687 (OF300) ( 0.5Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens, crescent Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6688 (OF300) ( 0.6Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens, crescent Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6689 (OF300) ( 0.5Mb )
Taken with an 80-mm lens, crescent Earth with north down. Scan by NASA Johnson.

Frames 6690-6696 were taken during the approach to Earth with a 250-mm lens.


AS11-44-6690 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )

The coast of Somalia is at the top. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6691 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )
The coast of Somalia is at the top. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6692 (OF300) ( 0.7Mb )
The coast of Somalia is at the top. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6693 (OF300) ( 0.9Mb )
The coast of Somalia is at the lower right. Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6694 (OF300) ( 0.4Mb )
Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6695 (OF300) ( 0.4Mb )
Scan by NASA Johnson.
AS11-44-6696 (OF300) ( 0.8Mb )
The coast of Somalia is at the right. Scan by NASA Johnson.

Magazine 45/W (B & W) Frames 6697-6713

Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 0.7 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

Magazine 45 was used in the Apollo Lunar Surface Closeup (Gold) Camera. The area shown in each images is 72 mm by 83 mm.

Anaglyphs created by Erwin D'Hoore from scans found on the website of the Lunar and Planetary Institute.


AS11-45-6697 RB Anaglyph ( 2.4Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6697 Wiggle Stereo ( 0.2Mb )
Animated gif should be opened with a browser. Stereo view created by John Lloyd.
AS11-45-6698 RB Anaglyph ( 2.3Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6698 Wiggle Stereo ( 0.2Mb )
Animated gif should be opened with a browser. Stereo view created by John Lloyd.
AS11-45-6699 RB Anaglyph ( 2.3Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6700 RB Anaglyph ( 2.1Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6701 RB Anaglyph ( 2.4Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6702-1 RB Anaglyph ( 2.3Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6702 RB Anaglyph ( 2.3Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6703 RB Anaglyph ( 2.2Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6704 RB Anaglyph ( 2.4Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6705 RB Anaglyph ( 2.2Mb )
Note what appear to be soil clods at the bottom. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6705 Wiggle Stereo ( 0.2Mb )
Animated gif should be opened with a browser. Stereo view created by John Lloyd.
AS11-45-6706 RB anaglyph ( 2.2Mb )
At least some of the large pieces in this image appear to be soil clods, perhaps resulting from disturbance of the area by one of the landing probes. See, for example, AS11-40-5917. Note that the area shown is 72 mm by 83 mm. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6706 Wiggle Stereo ( 0.2Mb )
Animated gif should be opened with a browser. Stereo view created by John Lloyd.
AS11-45-6707 RB anaglyph ( 2.2Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6708 RB anaglyph ( 2.1Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6708 Wiggle Stereo ( 0.2Mb )
Animated gif should be opened with a browser. Stereo view created by John Lloyd.
AS11-45-6709 RB anaglyph ( 2.1Mb )
110:59:12? This image shows a rock surface, undoubtedly a piece of basalt. The large, white area is an inclusion. Several circular zap pits are evident, including one immediately above the inclusion The image is about 3 inches (7.5 cm) across. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6710 ( 2.2Mb )
Possibly another spot on the same piece of basalt. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6712 RB anaglyph ( 2.1Mb )
Rounded rock about 2 by 2.5 inches. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6712 Wiggle Stereo ( 0.2Mb )
Animated gif should be opened with a browser. Stereo view created by John Lloyd.
AS11-45-6713 ( 2.3Mb )
111:00:01 Surface of a large piece of basalt. Note the large zap pit above center near the righthand edge. This boulder is probably the one Neil examined just as he was going out of the TV field-of-view to the right. After he finished examining this boulder, Neil left the ALSCC upright on the boulder surface while he deployed the LRRR and took Hasselblad documentation, as can be seen in AS11-40-5952. The boulder is about 3 meters ENE of the LRRR. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS11-45-6714 ( 1.5Mb )
111:00:01 Surface of a large piece of basalt, probably the one near the LRRR. Journal Contributor Vlad Pustynski has identified this boulder in AS11-37-5549 and AS11-39-5842, pictures Neil took out is window after the EVA.

Recovery and Post-Flight Photos

S69-40023 ( 128k or 354k )
Mission Control in Houston celebrates after splashdown. 24 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-40024 ( 144k or 429k )
Mission Control in Houston celebrates after splashdown. 24 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-40299 ( 328k or 878k )
Mission Control in Houston celebrates after splashdown. 24 July 1969.
S69-40302 ( 142k )
Mission Control in Houston celebrates after splashdown. 24 July 1969.
S69-21698 ( 210k or 770k )
Apollo 11 crew and a Navy diver await pickup after splashdown. 24 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-467 ( 236k or 510k )
Apollo 11 crew in isolation suits after splashdown. 24 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-40753 ( 143k or 832k )
The Apollo 11 crewmen, wearing biological isolation garments, arrive aboard the U.S.S. Hornet during recovery operations in the central Pacific. 24 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
USS Hornet Patch ( 143k )
This patch was used on-board the recovery carrier during Apollo 11. Provided by John Berry, a Honeysuckle Creek Apollo veteran. Scan by John Berry.
S69-21365 ( 132k or 308k )
Armstrong, Collins, and Aldrin (left to right) in their Isolation van on-board the recovery ship U.S.S Hornet being greeted by U.S. President Richard M. Nixon. 24 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1196 ( 143k or 910k )
Armstrong, Collins, and Aldrin (left to right) in their Isolation van on-board the recovery ship U.S.S Hornet being greeted by U.S. President Richard M. Nixon. Photo filed 24 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69P-658 ( 0.6Mb or 3.9Mb )
In this full version of the photo, the man in white shirt and tie to the right of the marine is Roderick (Rod) Bass. His daughter, Kristen, tells us that he used to say "To remember my name, just remember, use the Rod to catch the Bass" (smile)." Kristen adds, "He was involved in Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo, training both the crews and the recovery crews. He is no longer alive: passed away in January '91 from a cancerous brain tumor at the age of 52. We are left with exciting and loving memories." Photo filed 24 July 1969. Scan - and Rod Bass 'mug shot' - courtesy MIke Gentry/NASA Johnson.
KSC-69PC-429 ( 104k )
Armstrong, Collins and Aldrin smile through the window of the mobile quarantine van. 24 July 1969. Scan by Ken Glover.
69-H-1224 ( 157k or 1030k )
Traditional post-flight cake cutting ceremony was altered because the Apollo 11 astronauts were restricted to the Mobile Quarantine Facility. Photo filed 24 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
Don Blair's Ukulele Photo taken onboard USS Hornet ( 0.1 Mb )
Neil relaxes in the MQF aboard USS Hornet, playing a ukulele. This photograph and the two following were taken by Don Blair, who covered five spacecraft recoveries for the Mutual (radio) Broadcasting System. He describes his experiences in a 2004 book Splashdown: NASA and the Navy. In brief, he took three shots from outside the MQF through the end window, at about 10 p.m. ship-board time on the night after the recovery. The only other person present outside the MQF was a young marine guard. Blair used a Canon F1 loaded with Kodak high-speed Tri-X black and white film. He took three "quick shots .. the other two were even less sharp than the one you're looking at." 24 July 1969. Scan courtsey Jody Russell/NASA Johnson.
69-HC-840/69-H-1218 ( 1.3 Mb Color or 0.9 Mb )
The fact that Neil is wearing his "Hornet Plus Three" badge suggests that this photo was taken on-board the recovery ship. Unknown photographer. Scan courtsey Connie Moore/NASA HQ.
S69-40210 ( 1.1 Mb )
NASA Caption: "Interior view of a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF), showing the Apollo 11 crewmen soon after they arrived at Ellington Air Force Base after a flight from Hawaii aboard a U.S. Air Force C141 jet transport. Neil Armstrong is strumming on a ukulele. Michael Collins (right foreground) and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. (right background) are looking out the window. The other people in the picture are MQF support personnel. This picture was taken during brief welcome home ceremonies. "This photo was also taken through the MQF end window. Neil is sitting on the table while Buzz and Mike are at a side window. Buzz is talking to someone outside the MQF, using an audio handset. There appears to be a reflection of Buzz and Mike on the left side of the image. Unknown photographer. Scan and NASA caption courtsey Jody Russell/NASA Johnson.
S69-21783 ( 123k or 894k )
Apollo 11 Command Module during recovery operations. 24 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-21294 ( 185k or 972k )
The Apollo 11 spacecraft Command Module being lowered to the deck of the U.S.S. Hornet. Note that the flotation ring attached by Navy divers has been removed from the capsule. 24 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-39984 ( 167k or 698k )
The first Apollo 11 sample return container, containing lunar surface material, arrives at Ellington Air Force Base by air from the Pacific recovery area. Happily posing for photographs with the rock box are (left to right) George M. Low, Manager, Apollo Spacecraft Program, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC); U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Samuel C. Phillips, Apollo Program Director, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA HQ.; George S. Trimble, MSC Deputy Director (almost obscured); Eugene G. Edmonds, MSC Photographic Technology Laboratory; Richard S. Johnston, M.D. (in back), Special Assistant to the MSC Director; Dr. Thomas O. Paine, NASA Administrator; and Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, MSC Director. Caption courtesy of Mike Gentry, JSC Media Services, who writes " This was one of the first captions I wrote when I joined MSC in 1969." 25 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-39996 ( 199k or 796k )
The first Apollo 11 sample return container, containing lunar surface material, is unloaded at the Lunar Receiving Laboratory, bldg 37, Manned Spacecraft Center. 25 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-45002 ( 291k or 2351k )
This is the second rock box Neil filled on the lunar surface. It is the Documented Sample Apollo Lunar Sample Retrun Container and contains approximately 20 grab samples weighing a total of 5.5 kilograms. Neil collected these in about 3 1/2 minutes before starting closeout activities. As he used the tongs to collect a representative sampling of rocks, he put them in a 'weigh bag' made of teflon film. Once he was done, he put the entire weigh bag in the rockbox. In the photo, we see that the weigh bag has been torn open to reveal the rocks. Neil also packed the two core tubes in this box and these can be seen at the upper left. The gloved right hand of the vacuum-chamber operator is at the lower right. 26 July 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
69-H-1223 ( 134k )
Mobile Quarantine Facility is offloaded from USS Hornet. Photo filed 26 July 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-485 ( 143k )
Mike Collins (left), Buzz Aldrin, and Neil Armstrong relax in the transfer van. 26 July 1969. Research by Jay Hanks.
S69-21881 ( 196k or 778k )
Offloading of the Mobile Quarantine Facility from the USS Hornet, to be sent to Hickam AFB, Hawaii. 26 July 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S69-40147 ( 76k or 189k )
Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Mike Collins (left to right in the Isolation Van) with their wives, Pat Collins, Jan Armstrong, and Joan Aldrin (left to right?), on arrival at Ellington Air Force Base, Texas, on 27 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1246 ( 88k )
Aldrin, Collins, Armstrong (left to right), during a post-flight debriefing. Photo filed 3 August 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1247 ( 76k )
Armstrong, Collins, Aldrin (left to right) examining mission photos, apparently out-the-window photos of the LM shadow area. Photo filed 3 August 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-47292 ( 60k or 6.1Mb )
Apollo 11 sample 10071,0 is a 190-gram piece of angular, medium-light-grey, fine-grained basalt collected by Neil after 1112009 and returned to Earth in ALSRC No. 1004 (Documented Sample Container. In 2006, a portion of the sample was presented in Neil's honor to the Cincinnati Museum Center on the occasion of his receipt of NASA's Ambassador of Exploration Award. Scan courtesy Susan Erskin and Mike Gentry, NASA Johnson.
S69-47297 ( 56k or 7.3Mb )
View of sample 10071 from the side opposite that shown in 47292. Scan courtesy Susan Erskin and Mike Gentry, NASA Johnson.
S69-47304 ( 48k or 6.5Mb )
View of sample 10071 from the end that was on the righthand side in 47292. Scan courtesy Susan Erskin and Mike Gentry, NASA Johnson.
S69-47305 ( 48k or 6.1Mb )
View of sample 10071 rotated about 30 degrees to the right from the one in 47304. Scan courtesy Susan Erskin and Mike Gentry, NASA Johnson.
S69-47353 ( 92k or 6.2Mb )
View from above of sample 10071,1. Although the negative from which this scan was made in labeled "10070 1", we note that the description of sample 10070 is 'fine breccia' with no mention of vesicles. Charles Meyer of the NASA Johnson Sample Curator's office confirms that the negative was wrongly labeled. Scan courtesy Susan Erskin and Mike Gentry, NASA Johnson.
S69-47354 ( 56k or 6.6Mb )
View from the side of sample 10071,1. Similar notation problem to 47353, above. Scan courtesy Susan Erskin and Mike Gentry, NASA Johnson.
S69-47614 ( 433k )
Apollo 11 sample split 10071,2. Scan from the Apollo 11 Sample Catalog by Ken Glover.
S76-22607 ( 433k )
Apollo 11 sample split 10071,5, weighing 115.65 grams. Scan from the Apollo 11 Sample Catalog by Ken Glover.
S69-47388 ( 111k )
Apollo 11 sample 10072,0 is a 447-gram piece of highly vesicular basalt collected by Neil after 1112009. NASA scan courtesy Gary Lofgren and Terrie Bevill.
S69-40958 ( 156k or 677k )
Neil Armstrong celebrates his 39th birthday inside the Lunar Receiving Laboratory. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-41360 ( 121k )
Neil Armstrong greets friends after being released from quarantine. Deke Slayton is in the doorway behind Neil. In an October 2003 e-mail, Neil writes: "The lady with her hand on my shoulder is Deke's wife, Marge." 10 August 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S69-45495 ( 225k )
Mike Collins sits in hatch of Apollo 11 Command Module after its return to the Lunar Receiving Laboratory for detailed examination. Scan by J.I. Pickering.
69-H-1421 ( 136k )
Collins, Aldrin, and Armstrong in post-flight tickertape parade in New York City. NASA Administrator Thomas Paine is seated in front of Buzz. Photo filed 13 August 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1426 ( 232k or 597k )
Collins, Aldrin, and Armstrong in post-flight tickertape parade in Chicago. Photo filed 13 August 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
7008-86-1273D ( 170k or 905k )
Apollo-11 command module is readied to undergo vacuum bake after return to Downey plant. This procedure would remove any residual moisture from splashdown before the CM was encased in plastic for display at the Smithsonian. 5 September 1969. Scan of Rockwell photo by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1471 ( 128k )
Collins, Armstrong, Aldrin with U.S. Postmaster General Winton M. Blount unveiling a stamp honoring Apollo 11. Photo filed 9 September 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-1119 ( 144k or 312k )
Collins, Armstrong, Aldrin with U.S. Postmaster General Winton M. Blount unveiling a stamp honoring Apollo 11. Photo filed 9 September 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-967 ( 112k )
Aldrin (left), Collins, and Armstrong examine an Apollo 11 rock sample at a post-flight function. Photo filed 15 September 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1499 ( 248k )
Armstrong, flanked by Collins (left) and Aldrin (right), address a joint session of Congress. Photo filed 16 September 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
70-H-1567 (96k)
Mike and Pat Collins (left), Neil and Jan Armstrong, and Buzz and Joan Aldrin at the lodge of Norwegian Defense Minister Otto Greig, 40 miles from Oslo, during the 'Giant Step - Apollo 11' Presidential Goodwill Tour. Photo filed 11 October 1969. Scan by Frederic Artner.
70-H-1005 (73k)
Mike Collins (holding the post) and Buzz Aldrin examine Columbia on the first anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing. Neil Armstrong may be the individual hidden by the post. Photo filed 20 July 1970. Scan by Frederic Artner.
Launch Complex 39 (166k)
On the 5th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch, Armstrong (left), Aldrin, and Collins unveil a plaque designating Launch Complex 39 at the Cape as a site listed in the National Register of Historic Places. 16 July 1974. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
74-H-551 (128k)
Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins (left to right) unveil a plaque on designating Launch Complex 39 at the Cape as a site listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Photo filed 17 July 1974. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S76-22598 ( 780k )
Sample 10072,80 is a 142-gram portion of Apollo 11 Sample 10072,0. NASA scan courtesy Gary Lofgren and Terrie Bevill.
S78-34135 ( 155k )
Astronaut reunion at NASA Johnson. See a labeled detail for identifications, some of which were provided by Jack Schmitt. 22 August 1978. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
Flight Suits at NASM ( 40k )
The suits worn by Neil and Buzz on the Moon are seen here on display at the National Air and Space Museum in 1999. Training versions of the Gold camera (lower left), the Solar Wind Collector (right of center) and the EASEP (right foreground) are also displayed. Photo by Ken Glover.
IVA Glove at the Kansas Cosmosphere ( 209k )
These IVA ('IntraVehicular Activity') gloves were worn by Neil and Buzz during both descent and ascent. Photo and scan by Mike Poliszuk.
Apollo 11 Sample 10072,80 at Tidbinbilla ( 780k )
This sample was handcarried to Australia in 1994 by Honeysuckle Creek veteran John Saxon in 1994 and was presented by John Young to honor Australia's contribution to the success of Apollo 11 twenty-five years previously. Photo by Mike Dinn.
Trout Trophy ( 298k )
In 2002, Guenter Wendt holds the trout trophy presented to him by Mike Collins just prior to the Apollo 11 launch. Collins and Wendt spent quite a bit of time fishing together and the full story of the trophy can be found on page 132 in Wendt's 2001 autobiography "The Unbroken Chain". Photo and scan courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann.
Command Module Columbia with Sextant and Telescope Aperatures Labelled (90k)
Photo taken by David Woods at the US. National Air and Space Museum.
Hasselblad Magazine S - Rear View ( 150k )
View of the back, top, and lefthand side of the Hasselblad magazine used by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin during the Apollo 11 EVA. Note the hook on the back that was used to attach the magazine to the Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC) for transfer to the cabin at the end of the EVA. Note, also, the orange decal on the top showing f-stops to be used for photography in various directions relative to the Sun. Note, also, the wire handle on the lefthand side attached to dark slide that was in place whenever the magazine wasn't attached to the camera. In the case of this magazine, the dark slide was removed early in preparations for the EVA, just before the magazine was attached to the EVA Hasselblad. The dark slide was then stowed in the LHSSC (Left Hand Side Stowage Compartment and wasn't inserted again until the magazine was transferred back up to the cabin on the LEC at the end of the EVA. October 2004. Photo by Ulli Lotzmann at the National Air and Space Museum.
Hasselblad Magazine S - Top View ( 141k )
View of the top and lefthand side of the Hasselblad magazine used by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin during the Apollo 11 EVA. October 2004. Photo by Ulli Lotzmann at the National Air and Space Museum.
Hasselblad Magazine S - Front View ( 549k )
View of the front of the Hasselblad magazine used by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin during the Apollo 11 EVA. April 2006. Photo by Ulli Lotzmann at the National Air and Space Museum.
Hasselblad Magazine R - Top View ( 135k )
View of the top and front of one of the Hasselblad magazines used by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin in the LM cabin but not taken outside. The notation 'HCEX' on the f-stop decal indicates this magazine contained color film. October 2004. Photo by Ulli Lotzmann at the National Air and Space Museum.
Hasselblad Magazine R - Front and Lefthand Side View ( 137k )
View of the front and lefthand surfaces. The wire handle on the lefthand side is attached to the dark slide and is larger enough to accomodate the glove fingers and make removal of the dark slide relatively easy. Note that the silver-colored, reflective outer surface of this magazine, which means it could have been taken outside without overheating. . October 2004. Photo by Ulli Lotzmann at the National Air and Space Museum.
Hasselblad Magazine R - Front and Righthand Side View ( 137k )
View of the front and righthand surfaces, showing the frame counters and the 'Mag. R' decal. October 2004. Photo by Ulli Lotzmann at the National Air and Space Museum.
Buzz's Flown Suit ( 67k )
Ulli Lotzmann with Buzz's flown suit at the National Air and Space Museum's Garber Facility. August 2005. Photo by Bill Ayrey.
Flown Star Charts ( HTML link )
These star charts, printed back-to-back on a single, stiff sheet, were flown to the lunar surface in Eagle and have been signed by Buzz Aldrin. June 2005. Photo and scan courtesy Larry McGlynn.
Mint-Condition Apollo 11 Patch/Crest ( HTML link )
Hamish Lindsay and Colin Mackellar have provided a high-quality scan of a mint-condition crest/patch from Hamish's personal collection.
Front of Neil's Flown Suit ( 51k )
Ulli Lotzman poses with Neil's flown suit at the National Air and Space Musuem's Garber Facility. See, also, Karl Dodenhoff's connector layout diagram. Ulli notes, "The patches and name tags and the Apollo 11 suits were never removed - they are the original, flown ones." April 2006.
Original Name Tag on Neil's Flown Suit ( 41k )
Photo taken at National Air and Space Musuem's Garber Facility courtesy Ulli Lotzmann. April 2006.
Original U.S. Flag on Neil's Flown Suit ( 43k )
Photo taken at National Air and Space Musuem's Garber Facility courtesy Ulli Lotzmann. April 2006.
Left Boot on Neil's Flown PGA (Pressure Garment Assembly) ( 53k )
Photo taken at National Air and Space Musuem's Garber Facility courtesy Ulli Lotzmann. April 2006.
Stan Lebar's Apollo 11 Embroidered Patch ( 0.5Mb )
. Colin Mackellar displays an Apollo 11 patch provided by Stan Lebar, the Westinghouse Lunar Camera Program Manager. "Stan kindly loaned me his original A11 patch to scan for the HSK website. it looks fantastic when held up to the light. I suppose I really should call it an 'embroidered patch. The colour varies quite a bit (depending on lighting and background), but in full sunlight, the border is lovely gold, and the blue border is iridescent. The oblique shot(linked below) is probably the closest. I have no idea how many of these were produced, but Stan was given this one for his part in managing the Apollo 11 Lunar TV Camera program." Compare with the version printed on a square of Beta cloth ( 1.4Mb ) and then sewn on Neil's flown suit.

Colin provided photos of the patch face-on on a white background ( 1Mb, face-on on a purple background ( 1.3Mb ), reversed ( 0.3Mb ), at an oblique angle ( 0.3Mb ), and face-on in a scanner ( 1.3Mb ). 2 March 2009.

Flown Apollo 11 Interim Stowage Assembly ( 0.4 Mb )
Image courtesy Allan Needell, National Air and Space Museum.

Mission Report Figures

Figure 5-5 ( 280k )

Pitch attitude time history during descent. Redrafted by Thomas Schwagmeier
Figure 5-6 ( 42k )
(a) Pitch gimbal angle. (b) Roll gimbal angle. Note that the vertical axes in the oriiginal version were mis-labeled. The upper panel shows Pitch Gimbal Angle and the lower panel shows Roll Gimbal angle. Redrafted by Thomas Schwagmeier.
Figure 5-8 ( 347k )
Enlarged map of the landing area with the ground track.
Figure 5-14 ( 1.6Mb or 372k)
Sextant footprint during CMP's attempts to locate LM.
UnNumbered Figure of Page 9-24 ( 63k )
Firing time remaining.
Figure 12-3 ( 150k )
CDR and LMP heart rates during the EVA.
Figure 16-22 ( 103k )
Electrical connector between RCU and PLSS.

Preliminary Science Report Figures

Figure 1-20a ( 768k or 101k )

Pre-landing view of the landing site, then near the terminator.
Figure 1-20b ( 947k )
Vertical review of the landing site during rendezvous.
Figure 3-3 ( 142k )
Lunar Orbiter 5 Mosaic showing the LM location and West Crater.
Figure 3-15 ( 280k )
Preliminary map of Hasselblad photo locations and directions.
Figure 3-16 ( 195k )
Preliminary traverse map.

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