Apollo 14 Multimedia

Apollo 14 Image Library

Figure Captions Copyright © 1996 by Eric M. Jones.
All rights reserved.
HTML Design by Brian W. Lawrence.
Last revised 13 October 2014.

 

No copyright is asserted for NASA photographs. If a recognizable person appears in a photo, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. Photos may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA or by any NASA employee of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if a NASA photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.

NASA photos reproduced from this archive should include photo credit to "NASA" or "National Aeronautics and Space Administration" and should include scanning credit to the appropriate individuals or agencies as noted in the captions.


Anaglyphs in the image libraries created from sequential panorama frames by the ALSJ editor exist only because of Yuri Krasilnikov's willingness to teach me the art. Whatever value the anaglyphs have is due to Yuri's insights and guidance. Flaws are my doing. Briefly, panorama stitching software Hugin is used to create both non-stereo pan assemblies and remapped versions of the images. The latter are then made into anaglyphs using GIMP. The individual remapped images are linked from the corresponding Library entries for the original frames. The remapped images can be used to create stereo views using other methods.


For those interested in the subject of Apollo Photography and the Color of the Moon, see a brief discussion written for the ALSJ by Michael Light.


Journal Contributor Paul White has made detailed comparisons of cloud patterns seen in a large number of Apollo images with imagery taken at close to the same time by various meteorlogical satellites.


This Apollo 14 Image Library contains all of the pictures taken on the lunar surface by the astronauts together with pictures from pre-flight training and pictures of equipment and the flight hardware. High-resolution version of many of the lunar surface images are included. A source for both thumbnail and low -resolution versions of the lunar surface images is a website compiled by Paul Spudis and colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston. Additional information can be found in Apollo 14 Photography, Part 1 ( (1.5Mb ) and Part 2 ( 13Mb ).


Sections:


Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera Images
Original LROC image courtesy NASA/GSFC/ASU. Deconvovled/enhanced versions courtesy NASA/GSFC/ASU/GoneToPlaid.


Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera Images
from above 100 km altitude

15 July 2009 02:43:40 UTC; Solar El/Az 13.1/271.1; LRO altitude 102 km; resolution 1.07 m/pixel (width), 1.08 m/pixel (height) ( 4.4 Mb )

Labeled versions and a link to the raw file (nacl00001055 aka M102265088L) are available at the LROC website.

Deconvolved, 0.5 m/pixel (3.9 Mb TIF);

Deconvovled, gamme-corrected 0.5 m/pixel (4.6 Mb TIF); and

Deconvolved, 1.0 m/pixel (4.6 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

11 August 2009 10:50:18 UTC; Solar El/Az 39.6/272.4; LRO altitude 104 km; resolution 1.06 m/pixel (width), 1.1 m/pixel (height)
LM and Cone Crater: deconvolved, 0.5 m/pixel (4.8 Mb TIF);

LM: deconvolved, gamma-corrected 0.5 m/pixel (3.8 Mb TIF); and

LM: deconvolved, 1.0 m/pixel (4.7 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

11 August 2009 12:49:52 UTC; Solar El/Az 38.6/272.3; LRO altitude 104 km, resolution 1.09 m/pixel (width) 1.09 m/pixel (height) ( 4.4 Mb )
Labeled versions and a link to the raw file (MM104634241LE) are available at the LROC website.

Deconvolved, 0.5 m/pixel (4.0 Mb TIF);

Traverses, deconvolved, 1.0 m/pixel (4.2 Mb TIF); and

Traverses: deconvolved, levels adjusted 1.0 m/pixel (4.9 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

07 September 2009 17:52:18 UTC; Solar El/Az 66.2/275.5; LRO altitude 110 km, resolution 1.14 m/pixel (width and height) ( 2.4 Mb )
With the Sun about 25 degrees west of the zenith, there is good definition of the EVA traverse along most of its length. The raw LROC image is M106985205LE.

Deconvolved. levels adjusted, 0.5 m/pixel (3.1 Mb TIF); and

deconvolved, levels adjusted 1.0 m/pixel (3.3 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.


Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera Images
from 40 to 50 km altitude

Five LROC images October 2009 to February 2010 with 0.5 m/pixel resolution ( 0.9 Mb )

This composite shows the portions of the five LROC images covering the area from the ALSEP array to North Triplet. They are presented in order of sun angle, starting with the 08 January 2010 image which has the Sun lowest in the west and ending with 29 November 2009 with the Sun lowest in the east. The sequence shows the effect of sun angle on the visiblitity of artifacts, craters, and boulders, particularly equipment near the LM. Notice, too, variations in the appearance of areas of disturbed soil, particularly around the LM.
05 October 2009 01:27:49 UTC; Solar El/Az 86.3/54.6; LRO altitude 48 km, resolution 0.51 m/pixel (width) 0.55 m/pixel (height) ( 5 Mb )
With the Sun near the zenith, definition of EVA tracks on level ground near the LM is good. Definition is poorer on the relatively level ground at the geology stops near the rim of Cone Crater. The difference may be due to sweeping of the ground by engine exhaust around the LM during the final phase of the descent. The raw LROC image is M109345337LC.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (3.7 Mb TIF); and

deconvolved, 0.5 m/pixel (3.4 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

01 November 2009 09:48:16 UTC; Solar El/Az 60.1/86.6; LRO altitude 47 km, resolution 0.48 m/pixel (width) 0.55 m/pixel (height) ( 0.9 Mb )
The detail linked here includes the LM, ALSEP, and Station A. The raw LROC image is M111708164LC.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (3.4 Mb TIF);

deconvolved, gamma-corrected, 0.25 m/pixel (3.5 Mb TIF);

deconvolved, 0.5 m/pixel (3.1 Mb TIF); and

deconvolved, gamma-corrected, 0.5 m/pixel (3.1 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

28 November 2009 16:15:38 UTC; Solar El/Az 32.1/89.1; LRO altitude 46 km, resolution 0.50 m/pixel (width) 0.55 m/pixel (height) ( 20 Mb )
View of both traverses. See, also, a labeled version (3.5 Mb). The raw LROC image is M114064206L.

Traverses, deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (31 Mb TIF);

deconvolved, gamma-corrected, 0.25 m/pixel (34 Mb TIF);

deconvolved, high pass, 0.25 m/pixel (40 Mb TIF); and

deconvolved, levels-corrected, 0.5 m/pixel (8 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

28 November 2009 18:08:59 UTC; Solar El/Az 33.1/89.0; LRO altitude 45 km, resolution 0.52 m/pixel (width) 0.55 m/pixel (height)
The raw LROC images are M114064206L and M114064206R. The Right images includes the ALSEP site and terrain west of the ALSEP. The Left image includes the LM and Cone Crater. GoneToPlaid has created a 0.5 m/pixel deconvolved, enhanced combination of the two images (14 Mb TIF).
26 December 2009 00:15:31 UTC; Solar El/Az 4.5/90.2; LRO altitude 46 km, resolution 0.46 m/pixel (width) 0.55 m/pixel (height)
The raw LROC image is M116425798L.

0.5 m/pixel deconvolved, gamma-corrected image (2.4 Mb TIF) by GoneToPlaid. With the Sun very low in the east, the landing site is heavily shadowed

08 January 2010 17:08:29 UTC; Solar El/Az 9.1/270.0; LRO altitude 41 km, resolution 0.41 m/pixel (width), 0.55 m/pixel (height) ( 5 Mb )
The image is grainy and the craters are flattened in the north-south direction. The east edge is just beyond Weird Crater. The raw image is M117609776RC.

Deconvolved, levels adjusted 0.25 m/pixel (2.9 Mb TIF);

deconvolved, gamma-corrected, 0.25 m/pixel (3.4 Mb TIF);

deconvolved, level-adjusted, 0.5 m/pixel (3.0 Mb TIF); and

deconvolved, gamma-corrected, 0.5 m/pixel (3.7 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

05 February 2010 01:08:41 UTC; Solar El/Az 36.6/273.0; LRO altitude 40.8 km, resolution 0.49 m/pixel ( 3 Mb )
The east edge is about midway between Stations A and B. The raw image is M119971387RC.

Deconvolved, level-adjusted, enhanced 0.25 m/pixel (3.6 Mb TIF);

deconvolved, level-adjusted 0.25 m/pixel (2.8 Mb TIF);

deconvolved, level-adjusted, enhanced, 0.5 m/pixel (3.4 Mb TIF); and

deconvolved, level-adjusted, 0.5 m/pixel (2.5 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

31 March 2010 15:16:34 UTC; Solar El/Az 84.4/21.9; LRO altitude 42 km, resolution 0.42 m/pixel (width) 0.55 m/pixel (height) ( 5 Mb )
The Sun is virtually at the zenith. The cable connecting the ALSEP Central Station to the Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment (SIDE) is prominent. The distance is 60 feet (18 meters). Part of the 310-foot (94-m) thumper/geophone cable can be seen extending south from the Central Station. The raw LROC image is M124687860R.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (2.4 Mb TIF); and

deconvolved, 0.5 m/pixel (2.1 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

27 April 2010 23:22:36 UTC; Solar El/Az 61.0/80.4; LRO altitude 40 km, resolution 0.43 m/pixel (width) 0.55 m/pixel (height)
The raw LROC image is M127049821R.

LM, deconvolved, high-pass, 0.25 m/pixel (3.1 Mb TIF); Labeled version from the ALSEP to Station A (0.5 Mb);

LM, deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (2.3 Mb TIF);

LM, deconvolved, 0.50 m/pixel (2.4 Mb TIF);

LM, deconvolved, high-pass, 0.50 m/pixel (2.8 Mb TIF);

traverses, deconvolved, 0.50 m/pixel (4.9 Mb TIF); and

traverses, deconvolved high-pass, 0.50 m/pixel (4.9 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

25 May 2010 05:27:58 UTC; Solar El/Az 34.0/86.3; LRO altitude 41 km, resolution 0.43 m/pixel (width) 0.55 m/pixel (height)
The raw LROC images are M129404545L (left) and M129404545R (right).

Traverses, deconvolved, 0.5 m/pixel (5.9 Mb TIF);

traverses, deconvolved, curves 0.5 m/pixel (8.7 Mb TIF);

broader area, deconvolved, 1.0 m/pixel (8.6 Mb TIF);

broader area, deconvolved, enhanced, 1.0 m/pixel (10.6 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

21 June 2010 13:21:44 UTC; Solar El/Az 8.1/89.1; LRO altitude 40 km, resolution 0.4 m/pixel (width) 0.55 m/pixel (height)
The raw LROC image is 131765772R.

LM, deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (3.0 Mb TIF);

LM, deconvolved, gamma corrected 0.25 m/pixel (3.5 Mb TIF);

LM, deconvolved, 0.5 m/pixel (3.1 Mb TIF);

LM, deconvolved, gamma-corrected, 1.0 m/pixel (3.5 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

5 July 2010 04:23:33 UTC; Solar El/Az 5.5/270.3; LRO altitude 45 km, resolution 0.45 m/pixel (width) 0.55 m/pixel (height)
The raw LROC image is M132943081R.

LM, deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (2.9 Mb TIF);

LM, deconvolved, gamma corrected 0.25 m/pixel (3.8 Mb TIF);

LM, deconvolved, 0.5 m/pixel (3.1 Mb TIF);

LM, deconvolved, gamma-corrected, 1.0 m/pixel (4.1 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.


Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera Images
from below 40 km altitude

6 September 2011 (release date) deconvolved to 0.25m/pixel (0.6 Mb)

LM and ALSEP detail. Downloaded from http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LRO/news/apollo-sites.html
6 September 2011 (release date) deconvolved to 0.25m/pixel (0.3 Mb)
Saddle Rock detail. Downloaded from http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LRO/news/apollo-sites.html
6 September 2011 (release date) deconvolved to 0.25m/pixel (1.3 Mb)
Cone Crater detail. Downloaded from http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LRO/news/apollo-sites.html

Landing Site Maps/Images

Restored Lunar Orbiter Mosaic of the Fra Mauro Site ( 3 Mb )

This is Lunar Orbiter frame 133-H2, taken by Lunar Orbiter III on 20 February 1967 from an altitude of 46.7 km. Resolution is about 0.8 meters per pixel. Compare with the 2-LS-1 EVA-2 map linked below. Downloaded from the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project website. A full-resolution TIFF file is available from the NASA Lunar Science Institute ( 700Mb ).
Red-Blue Anaglyph from LROC images ((0.7 MB)
Anaglyph by Patrick Vantuyne.
Pre-Flight 1:25,000 Map of Fra Mauro ( 0.3Mb )
The grid lines in this large scale map are 250 meters apart. The map is centered on the planned LM landing site at CQ.0/65.0. The planned stop at the rim of Cone Crater is 1.4 km ENE of the LM at DA.0/90.0. See, also, a high-quality scan of the similar Apollo 13 map along with a version showing elevation contours.
Pre-Flight Traverse Schematic Map ( 672k )
The original NASA caption reads: "Astronaut Alan B. Shepard and Edgar D. Mitchell plan to make two Extravehicular Activities (EVA) on the lunar surface after landing NASA's Apollo 14 spacecraft on the Moon. The predicted landing point in the Fra Mauro area is 3 degrees 40 minutes 19 seconds south latitude; 17 degrees 29 minutes 46 seconds west longitude. Shown are the two traverses the astronauts will take. Number one consists of first deploying and setting up the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP) and also the Laser Ranging Retro-Reflector (LRRR), going to the sample area, then a traverse around Doublet Crater then back to the lunar module. (This traverse is shown by a dashed line.) After a rest period the second EVA will start. This is shown by a dashed-dot line and will go to Cone Crater, a distance of approximately one mile. If time permits on their return, an alternate trip will be made around Triplet Crater. While astronauts Shepard and MItchell are on the lunar surface, Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot, will be orbiting the Moon." 23 November 1970. Scan by Frederic Artner.
Pre-Flight Apollo 14 Traverse Map ( 4.4Mb or 0.5Mb )
This is map 2-LS-1 EVA-2, which Ed Mitchell carried on the traverse to the rim of Cone Crater. The grid lines are 50 meters apart. The targeted LM landing site is at CQ.0/65.0, which is at the left edge of the map due west of the north rim of North Triplet. The planned stop at the rim of Cone Crater is Station C at DA.0/90.0. See, also, details for the western ( 0.6 Mb ) and eastern ( 0.8 Mb ) parts of the planned route. Scan courtesy Stephen Tellier, LPI.
Pre-Flight Geological Map of Traverse - Western Portion ( 0.2Mb )
The white circles represent ejecta blankets.
Pre-Flight Geological Map of Traverse - Eastern Portion ( 0.3Mb )
The white circles represent ejecta blankets.
Landing Site Model ( 52k.
This model was used to provide the crew with a realistic view of the landing site during training. Cone Crater is to the right of center near the bottom of the image. West is up.
Post-Flight Apollo 14 Traverse Map (1.45 Mb)
This is figure 10.18 from the Lunar Sourcebook, G.H. Heiken, D.T. Vaniman and B.M. French, editors, copyright 1991 by Cambridge University Press, reproduced with permission.
Post-Flight Apollo 14 Traverse Map (4.1Mb)M127
This is Plate 2 of USGS Professional Paper 880 Geology of the Apollo 14 Landing Site in the Fra Mauro Highlands by G.A. Swann, N.G. Bailey, R.M. Batson, R.E. Eggleton, M.H. Hait, H.E. Holt, K.B. Larson, V.S. Reed, G.G. Schaber, R.L. Sutton, N.J. Trask, G.E. Ulrich, and H.G. Wilshire. Scan by Brian McInall.
Apollo 14 Goes to Washington D.C. (0.2 Mb or 1.4 Mb)
Overlay of the traverse map, derived from high-reolsution Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images, on a simplified map of Washington D.C. With the LM placed at the Lincoln Memorial, the center of Cone Crater in on E Street between the South Lawn of the White House and the Ellipse. Comparision created by Thomas Schwagmeier.
Labelled ALSEP/LM/Station A from LROC image M127049821R (0.5 Mb)
This LROC image was taken at a solar elevation of 61 degrees. The relatively small range of surface brightness variation means that enhanced versions show areas of soil disturbed by the astronauts quite clearly. Among the labelled featres as two pieces of reflective material that show up at the same locations relative to nearby craters in both M127049821R and in M124687860R. The latter was taken at a solar elevation of 84 degrees. The fact that these reflections are seen in two LROC images taken under similar lighting conditions makes it likely that they are real, rather than artifacts in the LROC data. Both are labeled 'Kapton', although it is not certain that is what they are. LM/ALSEP/Stations A/G/H Map Detail (470k)
Detail from Plate 2 of USGS Professional Paper 880 Geology of the Apollo 14 Landing Site in the Fra Mauro Highlands. Scan by Brian McInall.
Post-Flight Apollo 14 Traverse Map (992k )
Annotated version of the Lunar Orbiter mosaic by Lennie Waugh, showing station activities and event times and suggested identifications for craters and other features mentioned during the traverse.
LM to Station A Segment of USGS Post-Flight Map (172k)
Detail from Plate 2 in the USGS Professional Paper 880. Scan by Brian McInall.
LM to Station A Traverse Segment (52k)
Shows features mentioned during the traverse segments and approximate locations of intermediate stops on a detail from the Lunar Orbiter mosaic. See, also, a 2009 revision based on an August 2009 image from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera, which shows the tracks made by the astronauts and the MET. Created by Lennie Waugh.
Station A Shaded Relief Map (352k)
This is a detail by Patricia M. Bridges from Plate 4 in USGS Professional Paper 880, Geology of the Apollo 14 Landing Site in the Fra Mauro Highlands. Scan by Brian McInall.
Station A to Station B1 Segment of USGS Map (228k)
Detail from Plate 2 in the USGS Professional Paper 880. Scan by Brian McInall.
Station A to Station B Traverse Segment (40k)
Shows features mentioned during the traverse segments and approximate locations of intermediate stops on a detail from the Lunar Orbiter mosaic. Created by Lennie Waugh.
Station B Shaded Relief Map (192k)
This is a detail by Patricia M. Bridges from Plate 4 in USGS Professional Paper 880, Geology of the Apollo 14 Landing Site in the Fra Mauro Highlands. Scan by Brian McInall.
Station B to Station B1 Traverse Segment (84k)
Shows features mentioned during the traverse segments and approximate locations of intermediate stops on a detail from the Lunar Orbiter mosaic. Created by Lennie Waugh.
Station B1 to Station B3 Segment of USGS Map (316k)
Detail from Plate 2 in the USGS Professional Paper 880. Scan by Brian McInall.
Station B1 to Station B2 Traverse Segment (34k)
Shows features mentioned during the traverse segments and approximate locations of intermediate stops on a detail from the Lunar Orbiter mosaic. Created by Lennie Waugh.
Station B2 to Station B3 Traverse Segment (72k)
Shows features mentioned during the traverse segments and approximate locations of intermediate stops on a detail from the Lunar Orbiter mosaic. Created by Lennie Waugh.
Station B3 Shaded Relief Map (312k)
This is a detail by Patricia M. Bridges from Plate 5 in USGS Professional Paper 880, Geology of the Apollo 14 Landing Site in the Fra Mauro Highlands. Scan by Brian McInall.
Station B3 to Station C-Prime Segment of USGS Map (305k)
Detail from Plate 2 in the USGS Professional Paper 880. Scan by Brian McInall.
Station B3 to Station C-Prime Traverse Segment (48k)
Shows features mentioned during the traverse segments and approximate locations of intermediate stops on a detail from the Lunar Orbiter mosaic. Created by Lennie Waugh.
Station C-Prime Shaded Relief Map ( 736k )
This is a detail by Patricia M. Bridges from Plate 5 in USGS Professional Paper 880, Geology of the Apollo 14 Landing Site in the Fra Mauro Highlands. Scan by Brian McInall.
Cone Crater and Stations B3, C-Prime, C1, C2 on USGS Map (572k)
Detail from Plate 2 in the USGS Professional Paper 880. Scan by Brian McInall.
Station C-Prime to Station C-1 Traverse Segment (36k)
Shows features mentioned during the traverse segments and approximate locations of intermediate stops on a detail from the Lunar Orbiter mosaic. Created by Lennie Waugh.
Station C-1 to Station C-2 Traverse Segment (35k)
Shows features mentioned during the traverse segments and approximate locations of intermediate stops on a detail from the Lunar Orbiter mosaic. Created by Lennie Waugh.
Station C-2 to Station Dg Traverse Segment (27k)
Shows features mentioned during the traverse segments and approximate locations of intermediate stops on a detail from the Lunar Orbiter mosaic. Created by Lennie Waugh.
Station D to Station E Segment of USGS Map (227k)
Detail from Plate 2 in the USGS Professional Paper 880. Scan by Brian McInall.
Station E to Station F Segment of USGS Map (253k)
Detail from Plate 2 in the USGS Professional Paper 880. Scan by Brian McInall.
Station Dg to Station F Traverse Segment (40k)
Shows features mentioned during the traverse segments and approximate locations of intermediate stops on a detail from the Lunar Orbiter mosaic. Created by Lennie Waugh.
Station E to Station F Traverse Segment (28k)
Shows features mentioned during the traverse segments and approximate locations of intermediate stops on a detail from the Lunar Orbiter mosaic. Created by Lennie Waugh.
Station F to Station G Segment of USGS Map (225k)
Detail from Plate 2 in the USGS Professional Paper 880. Scan by Brian McInall.
Station F to Station G Traverse Segment (34k)
Shows features mentioned during the traverse segments and approximate locations of intermediate stops on a detail from the Lunar Orbiter mosaic. Created by Lennie Waugh.
Station G Shaded Relief Map (113k)
This is a detail by Patricia M. Bridges from Plate 6 in USGS Professional Paper 880, Geology of the Apollo 14 Landing Site in the Fra Mauro Highlands. Scan by Brian McInall.
Station G to LM Segment of USGS Map (108k)
Detail from Plate 2 in the USGS Professional Paper 880. Scan by Brian McInall.
Station G to Station G1 and LM Traverse Segment (26k)
Shows features mentioned during the traverse segments and approximate locations of intermediate stops on a detail from the Lunar Orbiter mosaic. Created by Lennie Waugh.
Station G1 Shaded Relief Map (99k)
This is a detail by Patricia M. Bridges from Plate 6 in USGS Professional Paper 880, Geology of the Apollo 14 Landing Site in the Fra Mauro Highlands. Scan by Brian McInall.
LM to Station H and ALSEP Traverse Segments (32k)
Shows features mentioned during the traverse segments and approximate locations of intermediate stops on a detail from the Lunar Orbiter mosaic. Created by Lennie Waugh.
Station H Shaded Relief Map (99k)
This is a detail by Patricia M. Bridges from Plate 6 in USGS Professional Paper 880, Geology of the Apollo 14 Landing Site in the Fra Mauro Highlands. Scan by Brian McInall.

Assembled Panoramas

109:46:23 Post-landing LMP Window Pan (10 Mb or 0.3 Mb)

The frames are AS14-65-9202 to 9207. Assembled by Eric Jones.
109:46:23 Post-landing CDR Window Pan (4 Mb or 0.2 Mb)
The frames are AS14-65-9209 to 9215. Assembled by Karl Dodenhoff.
109:46:23 Post-landing Combined Window Pans ( 309k )
Combination of the two window pans by Karl Dodenhoff.
114:53:38 LM 4 O'clock Pan ( 867k )
Al took this pan from a position just northeast of the LM. The frames are AS14-66-9236 to 9257. Assembly by Adam Bootle.

A high-resolution version (11 Mb) and a halfsize presentation with anagylphs in context (6 Mb) have been assembled by Eric Jones. An artistic version ( 160k ) has been assembled by Chris Wells. Sharp-eyed readers will note that, because Al took the pan from a spot close to the LM, the top of the spacecraft is not actually visible. Chris has added black sky to give continuity with adjacent frames.

Dave Byrne has created a third version ( 360k ).

Ricardo Salamé has assembled frames 9250 to 54 ( 146k ), showing the LM.

Erik van Meijgaarden has combined frames 9254 and 9255 as a 4 o'clock portrait of the LM (1.2Mb).

114:53:38 LM 8 O'clock Pan ( 317k )
Al took this pan from a position southeast of the LM. It consists of frames AS14-66-9271 to 9293. Assembly by Dave Byrne.

Warren Harold at NASA Johnson has assembled an alternate version of this pan.

114:57:20 LM 12 O'clock Pan ( 289k )
Al took this pan from a position west of the LM. The frames are AS14-66-9294 to 9316. Assembly by Dave Byrne.

A high-resolution version of the eastern portion (9 Mb) and a presentation of anagylphs in context (15 Mb) have been assembled by Eric Jones.

A high-resolution version of the western portion (8 Mb) and a presentation of anagylphs in context (12 Mb) have been assembled by Eric Jones.

Mike Constantine has created a continuous version (1.0Mb) in QuickTime format.

David Harland has used AS14-66-9305 and 9306 to show the LM with Cone Ridge just to the left of the spacecraft ( 0.9 Mb ).

119:42:01 Post-EVA-1 Window Pan ( 152k )
Ed and Al used the color magazine on Ed's camera to take a series of pictures of the site after EVA-1. The frames are AS14-66- 9317 to 9326. Assembly by Dave Byrne.
132:16:44 Station A Pan ( 252k )
The frames are AS14-68- 9394 to 9408. Frames AS14-68-9404 and 9405 both show Al walking toward the MET with the double core. This assembly uses Al's image from 9404. Assembly by Dave Byrne.

David Harland has combined 9405 and the lefthand portion of 9404 to create a mini-pan ( 2.0 Mb ) of Al at the MET with the double core.

David Nathan has assembled a high-resolution partial pan ( 5.7 Mb ) showing Al, the MET, and the LM, using Al's image from 9405. Because Al was moving, the shape and position of his shadow is different in all the frames in which it is visible, namely, 9404-9407. As can be seen in a comparison between the raw assembly and the final assembly ( 177k ), David used the nearly complete shadow available in 9405, added the missing upper portion, and eliminated the shadows in 9406 and 9407 which Shepard produced once he got the front of the MET.

132:34:22 Station B Pan ( 283k )
Although the human eye does a far better job than the camera does of picking out the thin ovals appearance of all but the closest craters, Al's Station B pan gives an idea of the problem involved in trying to figure out where, exactly, they were. The frames are AS14-64- 9049 to 9072. Assembly by Dave Byrne.
132:50:31 Station B1 Pan ( 345k )
The frames are AS14-64- 9075 to 9097. Al's pan contains two famous pictures of Ed studying the map, trying to figure out where they are. An assembly by Dave Byrne ( 276k ) uses AS14-64-9088, which shows Ed with his back to us; while an alternative assembly by David Harland ( 345k ) uses a profile portrait of Ed, AS14-64-9089.

Marv Hein has created a VR version ( 0.5 Mb ) of the Harland assembly.

Erik van Meijgaarden has created a high-resolution mini-pan ( 0.8 Mb ) using portions of AS14-64-9088 and 9089.

132:57:52 Station B2 Pan ( 288k )
Ed took this pan while Al stows the close-up camera on the MET, having just used it on Big Rock, which is next to Ed. The frames are AS14-68-9415 to 9429. Pan assembled by Dave Byrne.
132:57:52 Station B2 Northern View ( 262k )
I have cropped Dave Byrne's assembly of the Station B2 pan to show the portion from just south of down-Sun around to the north to just south of up-Sun. Assuming that horizontal distance on the image from down-Sun is proportional to azimuthal distance, a measurement of the distance on the image from down-Sun to up-Sun allows me to calculate the lateral positions of intermediate azimuths. From Station B2, the center of Cone Crater is approximately 52 degrees north of east and a tangent to the rim of Cone drawn from B2 is 34 degrees north of east. These two directions are indicated in the image. Because of camera optics, horizontal distance on the image is not strictly proportional to azimuthal distance; but, because we are interested here only in azimuthal distances across one or more Hasselblad frames, the errors are not important.
132:57:52 Station B2 Up-Sun View ( 2.0Mb )
I have combined AS14-68-9421 and 9422 to create an up-Sun showing Al pulling the MET and, to the left of the Sun, the high-point he has been moving toward. In a labeled version ( 2.0Mb ), I have indicated the approximate directions of (1) a tangent to the south rim - marked 'South Rim' - and (2) the center of Cone Crater. If Al and Ed want to reach the crater rim, they have to head at least slightly leftward of the 'South Rim' direction.
133:14:34 Station B3 Pan ( 275k )
Ed's pan was taken during a brief rest stop on the climb up Cone Ridge. The frames are AS14-68- 9430 to 9442. Pan assembled by Dave Byrne.
132:57:52 Station B3 Northern View ( 250k )
Cropped version of Dave Byrne's assembly of the Station B3 pan with the approximate directions of the center of Cone Crater (82 degrees north of east) and a tangent to the south rim (42 degrees east of north) marked.
133:23:40 Station C-Prime Pan ( 325k )
Al took this pan when he and Ed finally gave up their unsuccessful search for the rim of Cone Crater. The frames are AS14-64- 9098 to 9122. Assembly by Dave Byrne.

Eric Jones has assembled high-resolution version of the southern portion (6Mb) and a version of the southern portion with analgyphs presented in context (11Mb). Al got enough overlap that the anaglyphs for a continuous stereo pan. The terrain at Station C-prime is quite rugged because of numerous large boulders and craters.

David Harland has assembled the portion showing the view to the west and around to the north ( 180k ). The Cone rim is just out of sight to the north.

David Harland has combined 9019, 9021, and 9022 to create of protrait of the MET at the Station C-Prime Crater ( 2.3 Mb ). The crater is numbered 1101 in a detail ( 305k ) from Plate 2 in USGS Professional Paper 880. An alternate version ( 0.9 Mb ) has been cropped and the reseau crosses have been removed.

Erwin D'Hoore has created red-blue anaglyphs from pairs of frames between 9100 and 9108.

Jim Scotti has created an anaglyph from 9102 and 9103 ( 752k ).

Erik van Meijgaarden has created a mini-pan ( 0.5 Mb ) of Ed at the MET, using AS14-64-9117 to 9120.

133:40:48 Station C-1 Pan ( 123k )
This series of photos by Ed Mitchell shows Contact Rock (left), Saddle Rock (right), and Layered Rock (center). In USGS Professional Paper 880, Geology of the Apollo 14 Landing Site, in the Fra Mauro Highlands, the gap between the two portions of the mini-pan is estimated to be 1.5 degrees wide. The frames are AS14-68-9448 to 51. Assembly by Dave Byrne.

Frames 5449-51 have been used in a high-resolution portrait of Saddle Rock ( 3Mb ). Assembly by Eric Jones.

134:04:53 Weird Rock ( 71k )
Al made a quick side trip to examine this boulder, now known as Weird Rock, during the traverse to Station F. He took a three-photo portrait, which has been assembled by David Harland.
134:07:18 Station F Pan ( 261k )
Al and Ed stopped to do Station F not far west of Weird Rock. One frame of Al's pan shows Ed working at the MET. Assembly by Dave Byrne.

David Harland has assembled the portion of the pan that shows Cone Ridge ( 122k ) and, in the foreground, Weird Rock.

134:36:42 Station G Pan ( 257k )
Al took this pan after finishing a trench. The LM is down-Sun of their present location, partly obscured by an intervening ridge. The frmaes are AS14-64-9167 to 9187Assembly by Dave Byrne.
134:36:42 Station G Pan Detail - Ed at MET ( 172k )
This detail of Ed at the MET from Al's Station G pan was assembled by Mike Constantine.
135:01:30 Station H Pan ( 272k )
Ed took this pan near Turtle Rock, the largest member of a boulder field north of the LM. Assembly by Dave Byrne.

Erik van Meijgaarden has combined 9486 and 9487 as a portrait of Al at the LM ( 392k ).

136:26:06 Post-EVA-2 Window Pan ( 4.5 Mb )
At some point after the PLSS jettison at 136:26:06, Ed Mitchell took a series of photos out his window. The frames are AS14-66-9335 to 9343. Assembled by Eric Jones Journal Contributor Mark Rosen calls attention to two small, fuzzy orange spots just above the lunar horizon and just to the left fo center. As detailed in a discussion, these appear in both 9337 and 9342 and are probably reflections of a light on Al's side of the cabin off the two panes of Ed's window.

Crew and Equipment Pre-Flight

64-Apollo-4 ( 182k

NASA caption reads,""(USN) Commander Alan B. Shepard, Jr. in command Station couch of Command Module Mockup No. 2 inspecting main display panel at North American Aviation Corporation, Downey, California." At this time, although Shepard had been removed from flight status becuase of his inner ear problems, he was Chief of the Astronaut Office and would naturally have participate in crew system evaluations such as this one. Scan by Frederic Artner.
S69-43516 ( 175k or 829k )
Backup crewmembers Joe Engle (left) and Gene Cernan on a geology field trip at Craters of the Moon, Idaho. 22-23 August 1969. Scan courtesy Mike Gentry, Jody Russell, and Kathy Strawn, NASA Johnson.
S69-43552 ( 162k or 811k )
Al Shepard (light blue shirt) and Ed Mitchell (cap) on a geology field trip, probably at Craters of the Moon, Idaho. Probably 22-23 August 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-43599 ( 199k or 886k )
Backup crewmembers Joe Engle (right) and Gene Cernan on a geology field trip at Craters of the Moon, Idaho. 22-23 August 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S69-43750 ( 205k or 982k )
Backup crewmembers Joe Engle (right) and Gene Cernan on a geology field trip at Craters of the Moon, Idaho. 22-23 August 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S70-17851 ( 45k )
Original artwork for the Apollo 14 insignia/patch. Scan by NASA Johnson.
EMU Configuration Differences, Apollo 14 versus Apollo 13 ( 25k )
Scan by Ulrich Lotzmann.
KSC-70C-156BW ( 148k )
The Modular Equipment Transporter (MET) was stowed on top of the MESA blankets. 13 January 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70C-165BW ( 1.2 Mb )
The Modular Equipment Transporter (MET) is shown next to LM-8 at the Cape. 13 January 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S70-26023 ( 1.6 Mb )
The Modular Equipment Transporter (MET) possibly in the Centrifuge Building. 13 January 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S70-27169 ( 183k or 886k )
Astronaut Bruce McCandless tests the stability of the MET on an uneven surface in the 1/6th-g aircraft. 23 January 1970. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S70-29540 ( 252k or 886k )
Al Shepard works at the MET during a geology training exercise conducted during the week of February 13-18, 1970 in the Pinacate volcanic area of northwestern Sonora, Mexico, near Sonorita. A detail shows the DAC decals. Research by J.L. Pickering.
STS059-206-069 - Pinacate Volcanic region ( 1468k )
STS-59 view to the west across northwestern Mexico, with Baja California near the top. 9-20 April 1994.
ISS004-E-12326 - Cerro Pinacate Volcano ( 79k )
This ISS image of Cerro Pinacate Volcano was taken on 23 May 2002.
70-H-536 ( 135k or 711k )
Joe Engle (left) pours a sample into a bag held by Gene Cernan in the Pinacate volcanic area of northwestern Sonora, Mexico, near Sonorita. 14 February 1970. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
70-H-538 ( 128k or 696k )
Gene Cernan (left), MSC geologist Mike McEwen, Joe Engle, and Ted Foss in the Pinacate volcanic area of northwestern Sonora, Mexico, near Sonorita. Foss was MSC Geology Branch Chief in the late 1960s. 14 February 1970. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S70-34414 ( 148k or 611k )
Al Shepard (left) holds the scoop high enough that Ed Mitchell can take the sample without bending, something he would not be able to do easily in the pressure suit on the Moon. Note that Al is wearing a stereocamera that was under development but was never flown. Journal Contributor Markus Mehring tells us that the red dot at the top left on the back of the 16-mm camera in the right foreground is "the end of film warning light, which lights up when there are less than 6 feet of film left in the magazine." The 16-mm camera was manufactured by Mauer and their label is at the bottom left on the back of the camera. A bettery pack (DAC Power Pack) is attached to the righthand side of the camera. Mehring notes, "The white cable below is the connector cable providing the DAC with power from the batteries. The DAC didn't have internal batteries, it always drew its power via a cable from the spacecraft circuits. And during mobile EVA usage, they of course didn't have that available, so they came up with this battery solution." Mission photo AS14-64-9121 shows the flight article. Research by J.L. Pickering.
S70-34415 ( 217k or 722k )
Al Shepard digs a trench during training at Kapoho, Hawaii. 2-4 April 1970. Research by J.L. Pickering.
S70-34417 ( 2 Mb )
Al Shepard and Ed MItchell training at Kapoho, Hawaii. 2-4 April 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S70-34421 ( 1.7 Mb )
NASA caption: "Prime crew men and backup crew men, of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission, look over an area near the site of a volcanic eruption on Dec. 30, 1969. Astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr. (leaning with left hand on ground) and Edgar D. Mitchell (behind Shepard, wearing dark glasses) are the prime crew men scheduled to walk on the moon. Astronauts Eugene A. Cernan (almost obscured at extreme left) and Joe H. Engle (partially visible, on Cernan's right) are backup crew commander and lunar module pilot, respectively, for the mission. Others in the photograph are Pat Crosland (in hard hat), a geologist and a park ranger in Hawaii Volcanoes State Park; Michael C. McEwen (facing Mitchell) of the Geology Branch, Lunar and Earth Sciences Division, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC); and astronaut Bruce McCandless II, who made the trip to serve as a spacecraft communicator during simulations of extravehicular activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. ". 2-4 April 1970. Scan downloaded from NASA.

Comparing this image with 70-H-757 suggests that the identifications of the backup-crew members are reversed. Both are behind Pat Crosland with Engle in the distinctive hat of the extreme left and, therefore, Cernan on Engle's left wearing a green-check shirt.

70-H-757 ( 160k or 799k )
Aloi Alae, Hawaii - Visit to a vent area where eruptions occurred in early spring of 1970. Spatter from the eruptions can be seen near the feet of the party members. Al Shepard (side view) Ed Mitchell (back to camera) are standing just downslope from the others. On the upper level, left to right, are Ron Blevins, with General Electric supporting the Lunar Surface Operations Office at MSC; backup LMP Joe H. Engle (western hat, looking down); Dr. Ted H. Foss, Chief of the Geology Branch, Lunar and Earth Sciences Division, MSC (dark glasses); and Maj. William J. Wood of the Lunar Surface Operations Office, MSC. 2-4 April 1970. Photo filed 7 May 1970. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
70-H-821 ( 117k or 580k )
Al Shepard (front) and Ed Mitchell (rear) ride from the suiting room to the altitude chamber. 26 May 1970. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-70P-222 ( 138k )
Alan Shepard prepares to enter the LM in the altitude chamber at KSC for a simulated exercise prior to actual altitude runs. 26 May 1970. Journal Contributor Danny Caes calls attention to the fact that Shepard appears to have a 'double bubble' helmet. Ed Hengeveld tells us that Shepard was actually wearing a clear, protective cover over his bubble helmet to keep it from getting scratch. An example can be seen to the right on the table in Apollo 17 pre-flight photo KSC-72P-537. The protective cover only covered the forward three-quarters of the bubble helmet. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-474 ( 203k )
Apollo 14 Backup LMP Joe Engle prepares for a CM altitude chamber run at KSC. 18 June 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
70-H-1407 ( 112k or 631k )
Stu Roosa prepares for an altitude chamber test. June 1970. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-70PC-476 ( 203k )
Apollo 14 Backup CMP Ron Evans prepares for a CM altitude chamber run at KSC. 18 June 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S70-45581 ( 204k or 451k)
Apollo 14 crew (top to bottom) of Ed Mitchell (LMP), Stu Roosa (CMP), and Alan Shepard (CDR) pose on the ladder of a LM mock-up . July 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S70-45572 ( 111k or 505k)
Fisheye view of Al Shepard (foreground) and Ed Mitchell working in a LM simulator. July 1970. Research by J. L. Pickering.
S70-45580 ( 144k or 661k)
Fisheye view of the interior of the Command Module simulator. Al Shepard is using the handcontroller while Stu Roosa (center) holds a checklist/datacard book and Ed Mitchell (left) monitors his side of the instrument panel. July 1970. Research by J. L. Pickering.
S70-45648 ( 129k)
Al Shepard is the Command Module Simulator. Stu Roosa is in the center couch. Note the handcontroller in the right foreground. July 1970. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
S70-45702 ( 96k or 424k)
Close-up of Al Shepard during EVA training. July 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S70-45734 ( 2.3 Mb)
Ed Mitchell (?) pulling the MET during indoor training. July 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S70-46153 ( 237k or 989k)
Al Shepard photographs Ed Mitchell and the flag during indoor EVA training. The S-band antenna is just beyond Ed. July 1970. Research by J.L. Pickering.
S70-46187 ( 184k )
Al Shepard works at the MESA during indoor training. July 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
Shepard LM Egress ( 75k )
Undated Ed Dempsey photographs. Scan by Frederic Artner.
Shepard on LM Ladder ( 90k )
Undated Ed Dempsey photographs. Scan by Frederic Artner.
S70-46152 ( 168k or 362k )
Ed Mitchell (left) watches Al Shepard working at the Central Station during ALSEP deployment training at the Cape. The Modular Equipment Transport (MET) is beyond the Central Station on the right. Next clockwise from the MET is the Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE), then the Charged-Particle Lunar Environment Experiment (CPLEE), the Central Station antenna mast still on its pallet, and the Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator (RTG). July 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S70-46157 ( 164k or 295k )
Al Shepard collects a sample with the tongs during a training exercise at the Cape in July 1970. Note that he has his left side visor down and his gold UV visor only halfway down. Jack Schmitt says that the grey box on the bracket attached to Al's RCU "is a training mock-up of the stereocamera that was under development by a small company for NASA. It was all that remained of Gene Shoemaker's dream of an automated Geological Surveying Staff." Development of the Lunar Geological Exploration Camera was unsuccessful. See the discussion in the Apollo 17 Journal at 142:54:53. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-70P-436 ( 124k )
Al Shepard suiting up for indoor EVA training. 16 July 1970. Scan courtesy NASA KSC.
S70-45689 (aka KSC-70P-416) ( 156k )
Al Shepard preparing for indoor EVA training. 16 July 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
70-H-1305 ( 124k or 660k )
Al Shepard trains with a mock-up of the Lunar Geological Exploration Camera. 21 July 1970. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S70-46156 ( 184k or 631k)
Al Shepard pulls the MET. The Central Station is in the background at the right. Al's Hasselblad is stowed on the MET. July 1970. Research by J.L. Pickering.
70-H-1391 ( 182k )
This NASA diagram shows the stowage locations for equipment to be carried on the Apollo 14 Modular Equipment Transport (MET). Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S70-46191 ( 148k or 1.7 Mb)
Al Shepard handles the 16-mm motion-picture Data Acquisition Camera (DAC) on the Modular Equipment Transport (MET) during a training exercise at the Cape. The Hand Tool Carrier is just in front of Shepard, while the large, canister-like object at the right is the Apollo Lunar Surface Close-up Camera, also known as the Gold Camera. A stack of "Dixie Cup" sample containers is below Shepard's right elbow. A Sample Collection Bag (SCB) is mounted on the side of the MET closest to us and the never-flown stereocamera is just the left of the SCB. July 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S70-45220 ( 78k)
Stu Roosa, probably at a press conference. 1 August 1970. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
Training at Nördlingen Ries Crater ( 68k )
(left to right) Al Shepard, Dr. Fred Hörz (NASA), Ed Mitchell, Prof. von Engelhardt, Gene Cernan, and Joe Engle during a 10-15 August 1970 field trip, hosted by Prof. Wolf von Engelhardt. Photo provided by Dr. Dieter Stöffler, a German geologist who also participated in the field trip.
KSC-70PC-486 ( 156k)
Backup Commander Gene Cernan (right) works at the Central Station, watched by Backup LMP Joe Engle. The Mortar pack is just in front of Engle, the Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE) just beyond him, and the Charged-Particle Lunar Environment Experiment (CPLEE) is beyond the PSE. The cable reel on the right edge of the image is part of the Thumper-Geophone. 27 August 1970. Scan by J.L Pickering.
KSC-70PC-487 ( 152k)
Backup LMP Joe Engle is shown with the thumper, which has a cable spool at each end. The cable at the big end carries the fire signals back to the Central Station while the other cable links the three geophones to the Central Station. The large end contains twenty-one small charges, each a single bridgewire, Apollo Standard Initiators (ASI). An initiator selector is on the top of the small end and the arm fire switch is on the shaft just under the strap for Engle's cuff checklist. 27 August 1970. Scan by J.L Pickering.
70-H-1115 ( 104k )
Al Shepard during suit-up for EVA training. 28 August 1970. Scan by J.L Pickering.
70-H-1117 ( 174k )
Ed Mitchell (left) and Al Shepard deploy the MET. 28 August 1970. Scan by J.L Pickering.
70-H-1116 ( 160k )
Ed Mitchell (left) reads his cuff checklist while Al Shepard works at the back of the MET. The MESA is in the background between them. 28 August 1970. Scan by J.L Pickering.
70-H-1119 ( 128k )
Al Shepard pulls the top of the U.S. flag taut. The top of the flag has a hem shown on so that it will slip onto a telescoping crossbar that will hold it out on the airless moon. Al may checking to make sure the crossbar is fully extended. Note the dirt-filled box at the lower right into which Shepard will plant the staff. 28 August 1970. Scan by J.L Pickering.
70-H-1120 ( 156k )
Al Shepard works with the TV tripod before taking the TV camera off the MESA and deploying it 40 feet from the LM. 28 August 1970. Scan by J.L Pickering.
70-H-1121 ( 148k or 331k )
Al Shepard stands next to the Modular Equipment Transporter (MET) during a training exercise at the Cape. A Hand Tool Carrier (HTC) similar to the one flown on Apollo 12 sits on top of the MET with a variety of sample collection bags hanging around the edge. An extension handle lies horizontally on the front of the HTC and, on Al's side of the MET, we see a stack of "Dixie Cup" sample containers and, also, the 16-mm movie camera. Note that, although Al has stripes on his arms and legs, he has none on his helmet as yet. 28 August 1970. Scans by J.L Pickering.
Training Photo ( 135k )
Al Shepard (right) works at the MET. Ed Mitchell is in the background. 28 August 1970. Scan by J.L Pickering.
S70-45808 ( 152k )
Al Shepard reaches for the handle of the MET. Note the Apollo Lunar Surface Close-up Camera - known as the Gold Camera after the experiments Principal Investigator, Tommy Gold - at the front of MET. 28 August 1970. Scan by J.L Pickering.
S70-45833 ( 140k )
This photo shows Ed Mitchell during a ALSEP deployment practice. The MET is behind him at the right and the thumper is immediately beyond him. Note that Ed is not wearing a cuff checklist. 28 August 1970. Scan by J.L Pickering.
70-H-1122 ( 135k or 722k )
Ed Mitchell makes his way down a loose slope while attached to a six-degrees-of-freedom simulator. 28 August 1970. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
70-H-1123 ( 157k )
Ed Mitchell makes his way down a loose slope while attached to a six-degrees-of-freedom simulator. 28 August 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70P-303 ( 165k )
Al Shepard works at the MESA. Scan by J.L Pickering.
KSC-70P-344 ( 104k )
Backup Commander Gene Cernan getting suited for EVA training. 17 September 1970. Scan by J.L Pickering.
70-H-1198 ( 103k )
Backup LMP Joe Engle getting suited for EVA training. 17 September 1970. Scan by ed Hengeveld.
70-H-1201 ( 128k )
Joe Engle (left), the backup LMP, stands next to the mortar pack while Gene Cernan, the backup Commander, works at the Central Station. 17 September 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S70-19764 ( 132k or 801k )
Ed Mitchell (left) and Al Shepard (right) suited up for altitude tests. 17 September 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S70-45249 ( 100k )
Alan Shepard at a MSC press conference. September 1970. Scan by J.L Pickering.
70-H-1352 ( 138k )
Ed Mitchell demonstrates the MET, probably during a press conference. Scan by J.L Pickering.
S70-50763 (72k)
The drawing shows the Apollo 14 version of the Hand Tool Carrier fully loaded with traverse gear. Note that the sample bag in the center of the open, triangular framework, is not labeled. The Hand Tool Carrier was mounted on the top of the MET, as shown in NASA photo S70-29540.
70-H-1300 ( 136k or 384k )
Al Shepard, (right) watches Ed Mitchell on the ladder of a LM simulator during training. Note that Ed is not wearing a backpack and that stairs have been provided to bridge the gap between the bottom of the ladder and the footpad. 15 October 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S70-51703 ( 141k )
Stu Roosa and Al Shepard relax aboard Retriever during water egress training. 24 October 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-678 ( 194k or 937k )
Al Shepard trains with a mock-up of the Lunar surface TV camera while aboard a KC-135 aircraft. Ed Mitchell is in the background working at a MESA mock-up. 28 October 1970. Research by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-679 ( 3.2 Mb )
Al Shepard has his left hand on the handle of the MET. The Close-up Stereo Camera is on the right edge of the picture with the crew's two Hasselblads stowed on a shelf farther aft. The DAC is at the left edge of the image, mounted on a staff. The Hand Tool Carrier (HTC) is mounted on the fornt edge of the Met, nearest Shepard, with an extension handle stowed horizontally on top of the HTC. A detail may show some of the Velcro pieces "on the tongue" that Ed mentions at 132:09:02. 28 October 1970. Scan courtesy J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-680 ( 203k )
Al Shepard may be getting on his feet as the KC135 aircraft enters a 30-second period of one-sixth g. 28 October 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-682 ( 203k or 406k )
Ed Mitchell works with both Hasselblad cameras. The stowage locations on the MET for the cameras is at the bottom of the image. Compare with KSC-70PC-679. 28 October 1970. Scans by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-684 ( 133k )
Ed Mitchell (left) and Al Shepard work with the MET in the KC-135 aircraft. A detail shows what appear to be Velcro pieces on the front of the MET. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-686 ( 203k )
Ed Mitchell (front) and Al Shepard (rear) maneuver the MET in one-sixth-g training. 28 October 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-695 ( 203k )
Apollo 14 crew receives a Christmas card from a KSC worker in 1970. Note the crew images peering out from behind the Christmas tree on the card. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S70-53479 ( 177k or 629k )
Al Shepard (right) is training with the Modular Equipment Transporter (MET) in NASA's KC-135 aircraft at one-sixth g. Ed Mitchell follows at the back of the MET. The aircraft pilot flew the KC-135 in a series of parabolas and, on the descending branch, gave the crew about a half minute of one-sixth g. Then, as the pilot pulled up into the ascending branch, the crew experienced high g-forces and, before that happened, the support personnel helped them get down on the floor so they would not have to support themselves and the suddenly weighty suits. 4 November 1970. Research by J.L. Pickering.
S70-53480 ( 156k )
Al Shepard and Ed Mitchell (rear) train in the KC-135. 4 November 1970. Scans by J.L. Pickering.
S70-53483 ( 148k )
Al Shepard practices the flag deployment in the KC-135. 4 November 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-649 ( 168k )
Al Shepard leads his crew across the swing arm after inspecting the Command Module during rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-651 ( 124k )
Al Shepard (blue shortsleeve shirt), Stu Roosa (blue striped tie). Ed Mitchell (partially hidden, in dark brown suit trailing behind Shepard) and KSC officials walk past the crawler during rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70P-473 ( 104k )
Stu Roosa (left), Ed Mitchell, and Al Shepard in the cabin of the crawler transporter during rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague / J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-673 ( 170k )
Ed Mitchell (left) Al Shepard, and Stu Roosa pose in front of their Saturn V during rollout. 9 November 1970. Research by J.L. Pickering.
70-H-1524 ( 117k or 703k )
Ed Mitchell (left), Al Shepard, and Stu Roosa pose in front of their Saturn V during rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
70-H-1398 ( 80k )
Al Shepard (left), Stu Roosa, and Ed Mitchell pose during water egress training. 9 November 1970. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S70-54158 ( 3 Mb )
Al Shepard (left) and Ed Mitchell (right) doing a geology field exercise on the rim of one of 52 explosion craters at the Black Canyon Crater Field. Note the observer standing on the far rim of the crater. The crater field was constructed 24-26 February 1970 and was first used for training by the Apollo 13 crew on 16 March 1970. Sometime before 2007, the crater field disappeared under a housing development. 16 November 1970. Scan courtesy Mike Gentry, Jody Russell, and Kathy Strawn, NASA Johnson.
S70-54166 ( 3.7 Mb )
Al Shepard (left) and Ed Mitchell (right) doing a geology field exercise on the rim of an explosion crater at the Black Canyon Crater Field. 16 November 1970. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
S70-45738 ( 173k )
Al Shepard (foreground) and Ed Mitchell (background) suited for indoor EVA training. 8 December 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70P-503 ( 136k )
Ed Mitchell (left) pushes the lower section of the flagstaff into some lunar soil simulant inside the Training Building at the Cape. Al Shepard (right) walks toward him, apparently completing extension of the telescoping crossbar at the top of the flag. The MET can be seen in the plus-Y footpad beyond the S-Band antenna. 8 December 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-70P-510 ( 133k )
Al Shepard (right) uses a lanyard to pull an ALSEP package out of the SEQ Bay. Ed Mitchell (left) will lower the package to the floor. The MET is in the righthand foreground with a Hasselblad in a stowage clip. 8 December 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70P-508 ( 134k )
Ed Mitchell reads his cuff checklist, probably reviewing the procedures at 1+27 before removing the RTG fuel element with the Fuel Transfer Tool (FTT), which we see attached to the element in the cask. 8 December 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70P-498 ( 153k or 264k )
Al Shepard works at the MET. The 'alien' in the foreground is an armadillo. 8 December 1970. Scans by J.L. Pickering.
S70-45759 ( 190k )
Al Shepard takes a break during EVA training. 8 December 1970. Scans by J.L. Pickering.
Football-Sized Sample ( 272k )
In a lighthearted training moment, Al Shepard (right) and Ed Mitchell rehearse collection of a football-sized rock. See the discussion following 117:50:12. Note the Florida native in the foreground. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
APOLLO14-KSC-NOID ( 120k )
Ed Mitchell (left) goes toward the LM mockup while Al Shepard works with the telescoping crossbar at the top of the flag. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
Apollo 14 Crew ( 108k )
Al Shepard (left), Stu Roosa, and Ed Mitchell wait during a photo session. December 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S70-55387 ( 144k )
Apollo 14 crew (left to right) of Stu Roosa (CMP), Alan Shepard (CDR), and Ed Mitchell (LMP), in a formal portrait. December 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S70-55388 ( 116k or 751k )
Portrait of Ed Mitchell in his suit. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S70-55389 ( 125k or 808k )
Portrait of Al Shepard. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S71-51258 ( 130k )
Business suit portrait of Al Shepard. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S71-52272 ( 155k )
Portrait of Back-up LMP Joe Engle. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S70-55390 ( 128k or 639k )
Portrait of Stu Roosa. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S70-56287 ( 183k )
Al Shepard stands in front of one of NASA's Lunar Landing Training Vehicles (LLTV) prior to a flight at Ellington Air Force Base. 14 December 1970. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S70-55635 ( 182k or 681k )
Ed Mitchell (left), Al shepard, and Stu Roosa pose for a crew portrait. December 1970. Research by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70P-524 ( 124k )
Backup Commander Gene Cernan places the Modular Equipment Transporter in the plus-Y (north) footpad during training. The MET was stowed on top of the MESA blankets and had to be removed so that equipment stowed in the MESA could be accessed. 14 December 1970. Scan by J.L Pickering.
S70-56721 (36k)
Lab photo of the Lunar Portable Magnetometer (LPM) which was flown on Apollo 14 and Apollo 16. The box (lower left) containing the three-component readout gauges, the on/off switch and the high/low-gain switch was mounted on the MET (Apollo 14) or the back of the Rover (Apollo 16). The tripod was deployed 15 meters away from the MET or Rover and, as the tripod was carried out to the deployment site, the ribbon cable unwound off both sides of the centrally-mounted cable reel. Once the astronaut deployed the tripod, he went back to the MET/Rover and initiated a measurement. After waiting a pre-determined amount of time for transients to damp out, he read the X, Y and Z values on each of the two gain settings. He then went out to the tripod and changed the orientation of the sensor head at the top of the tripod, returned to the MET/Rover and made another measurement. Once the measurement series was finished, he retrieved the tripod, brought it back to the MET/Rover and rewound the cable using the handle visible on the right-hand side of the reel. Both Ed Mitchell (Apollo 14) and John Young (Apollo 16) had a great deal of trouble rewinding the cable.
70-H-1686 (1.9 Mb)
Full-width view the landing site model during a simulated descent. From inside the LM cabin, Shepard could see the left side and Mitchell the right. There was enough overlap between the two fields-of-view that both could see Center Triplet even as they got close to it.
70-H-1687 (1.7 Mb)
Full-width view the landing site model during a simulated descent.
S71-15507 ( 58k )
Al Shepard (left), Stu Roosa, and Ed Mitchell during a pre-flight press conference. 9 January 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S71-16804 ( 58k)
Flight Directors Pete Frank, Milt Windler, Gerry Griffin, and Glynn Lunney pose in the MOCR. January 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
71-H-24 ( 136k)
Ed Mitchell (left), Al Shepard, and Stu Roosa pose in front of the Apollo 14 Saturn V during roll-out. 11 January 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-71P-17 ( 90k)
Al Shepard during suitup for the Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-18 ( 76k)
Ed Mitchell during suitup for the Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-19 ( 86k)
Stu Roosa during suitup for the Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-13 ( 100k)
The Apollo 14 crew walks out to board the transfer van for the Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71PC-24 ( 169k or 1260k )
Al Shepard leads Ed Mitchell and Stu Roosa into the transfer van for the Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-71PC-67 ( 182k )
The Apollo 14 crew walks out to board the transfer van for the Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-71P-27 ( 94k )
The Apollo 14 crew on the swing arm. 19 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-28 ( 132k )
The Apollo 14 crew on the swing arm. 19 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
71-H-214 ( 141k )
Ed Mitchell follows Al Shepard across access arm to spacecraft during Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-71P-12 ( 224k )
Apollo Program Director Dr. Rocco Petrone, standing, confers with members of the KSC launch team during the Apollo 14 Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-71PC-32 ( 164k or 382k )
Apollo 14 backup crew (left to right) of Joe Engle (LMP), Gene Cernan (CMDR) and Ronald Evans (CMP) pose in front of a LM mock-up at KSC. 22 January 1971. Research by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-71PC-33 ( 180k )
Apollo 14 Backup Commander Gene Cernan. 22 January 1971. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-71PC-34 ( 172k )
Apollo 14 Backup Lunar Module Pilot Joe Engle. 22 January 1971. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-71PC-35 ( 146k )
Apollo 14 Backup Command Module Pilot Ron Evans. 22 January 1971. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-71PC-36 ( 192k or 745k )
Apollo 14 Backup Crew Joe Engle (left), Gene Cernan, and Ron Evans. 22 January 1971. Research by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-71P-43 ( 96k )
Apollo 14 Backup Crew Gene Cernan (left), Joe Engle, and Ron Evans with nurse Dee O'Hara prior to a pre-flight physicals. January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-44 ( 97k )
Apollo 14 Backup Commander Gene Cernan, left, outside astronaut crew quarters as Kennedy Space Center. Security officer Dearmond Matthews prepares to open the door to the quarantined area. 26 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
71-H-192 ( 83k )
Apollo 14 Backup Command Module Pilot Ron Evans waves from the cockpit of a T-38. 26 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
71-H-188 ( 138k or 795k )
Ed Mitchell, second from the left, Al Shepard, and Stu Roosa prepare for training in the simulators. 26 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
71-H-187 ( 136k or 808k )
Al Shepard poses next to a lunar module simulator at KSC. 26 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71PC-60 ( 136k )
Apollo 14 crew (left to right) of Stu Roosa (CMP), Alan Shepard (CDR) and Ed Mitchell (LMP) strike an informal pose. 29 January 1971. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
KSC-71P-71 ( 166k )
Stu Roosa (left), Alan Shepard, and Ed Mitchell during a photo session. 29 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
71-H-222 ( 188k or 1431k )
Another photo from the same session. 29 January 1971. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-71P-66 ( 91k )
Al Shepard in a T-38, probably at Patrick Air Force Base. 29 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-67 ( 101k )
Al Shepard signals to ground crew. 29 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-68 ( 115k )
Ed Mitchell at Patrick Air Force Base. 29 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-73 ( 105k )
Pre-launch breakfast. Clockwise from the left: Ed Mitchell, Tom Stafford, Stu Roosa, Al Shepard, Deke Slayton, Joe Engle, and Ron Evans. 31 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S71-16638 ( 141k )
Alan Shepard during Apollo 14 suit-up. 31 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71PC-73 ( 112k )
Alan Shepard during Apollo 14 suit-up. 31 January 1971. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
KSC-71P-0089 ( 180k )
Alan Shepard during Apollo 14 suit-up. 31 January 1971. Scan by KSC Archives.
KSC-71P-85 ( 93k )
Alan Shepard (center) during Apollo 14 suit-up. 31 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-83 (aka 71-H-234) ( 95k )
Alan Shepard (right) during Apollo 14 suit-up. Suit Tech Al Rochford is at the left. 31 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
71-H-240 ( 68k )
Alan Shepard during Apollo 14 suit-up. 31 January 1971. Scan by Frederic Artner.
KSC-71P-90 ( 91k )
Alan Shepard during Apollo 14 suit-up. 31 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71PC-85 ( 182k )
Alan Shepard during Apollo 14 suit-up. 31 January 1971. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-71P-84 ( 98k )
Stu Roosa during Apollo 14 suit-up. 31 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71PC-72 ( 161k )
Stu Roosa during Apollo 14 suit-up. 31 January 1971. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-71P-87 ( 99k )
Stu Roosa (left) during Apollo 14 suit-up. 31 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-88 ( 143k )
Ed Mitchell adjusts his watch. 31 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-86 ( 120k )
Apollo 14 crew during suit-up. 31 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-81 ( 102k )
Ed Mitchell (left), Stu Roosa, and Al Shepard walk out to the transfer van. Deke Slayton is immediately behind Mitchell and Roosa. 31 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-80 ( 118k )
Ed Mitchell (left), Stu Roosa, and Al Shepard walking out to the transfer van. Deke Slayton is immediately behind Mitchell and Roosa. 31 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71PC-68 ( 178k )
The Apollo 14 crew walkout on launch day. 31 January 1971. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-71PC-67 ( 182k )
The Apollo 14 crew about to board the transfer van. 31 January 1971. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-71PC-100 ( 118k )
Stu Roosa walks away from the transfer van while another member of the crew steps out onto the tarmac. 31 January 1971. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-71PC-99 ( 124k )
Alan Shepard examines weather conditions as he walks from the transfer van to the pad elevator on launch day. 31 January 1971. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-71PC-102 ( 116k or 440k )
In the White Room, Pad Leader Guenter Wendt proudly wears a 'Col. Guenter Klink' helmet while presenting Apollo 14 Commander Alan Shepard with a white cane labeled 'Lunar Explorer Support Equipment'. The fictional character, 'Col. Wilhelm Klink', was the incompetent Commandant of a German POW camp in a popular TV comedy of the time, 'Hogan's Heroes'. Col. Klink was played by Werner Klemperer. The cane is a reference to the fact that, at 47 years of age, Shepard was soon to be the oldest person - by far - to walk on the Moon. 31 January 1971. Scan by Kipp Teague.

Vehicle Assembly, Transport, and Pad Checkout

70-H-1092 ( 141k )

S-1C booster stage for Apollo 14 Saturn V being hoisted into High Bay 3 for erection on the mobile launcher in the Vehicle Assembly Building. 12 January 1970. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-70P-5 ( 178k )
The Apollo 14 spacecraft undergoes docking probe checks at KSC. 12 January 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70P-4 ( 244k )
The Apollo 14 spacecraft undergoes docking probe checks at KSC. 12 January 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
70-H-70 ( 134k or 709k )
The Apollo 14 descent stage being lowered into a pressure chamber for tests. 16 January 1970. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-70P-19 ( 145k )
The second stage of the Apollo 14 Saturn V is trucked into the VAB after its arrival the day before at the Turning Basin. 22 January 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
70-HC-793 ( 160k )
Apollo 14 S-IC stage during stacking in the Vehicle Assembly Building. 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
70-H-1093 ( 164k or 382k )
Apollo 14 S-II stage being moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building. 19 August 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-70P-210 ( 143k or 834k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V in the Vehicle Assembly Building. Scan by Kipp Teague / J.L. Pickering.
70-HC-794 ( 128k )
Antares Ascent stage during checkout. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
LMP Control Panel 2 ( 203k )
This is evidently a pre-installation photo. Scan courtesy Paul Fjeld.
KSC-70PC-537 ( 174k )
The Apollo 14 Lunar Module (right) undergoes checkout with Apollo 15's LM-10 in the background. 16 October 1970. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
70-HC-981 ( 180k or 650k )
The protective shroud or adapter stage is being lowered into place over the Apollo 14 Lunar Module Antares in the Vehicle Assembly Building at the Cape. 26 October 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-70P-374 ( 127k or 755k )
The protective shroud or adapter stage is being lowered into place over the Apollo 14 Lunar Module Antares in the Vehicle Assembly Building at the Cape. 26 October 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague / J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70P-384 ( 183k )
The Apollo 14 CSM undergoes final checks in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building at KSC prior to mating with the Spacecraft-Lunar Module Adapter (SLA). 2 November 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-602 ( 152k )
Apollo 14 spacecraft in the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at the Cape. The Launch Escape Tower is in the foreground at the lower left. 4 November 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-603 ( 203k )
Apollo 14 spacecraft being stacked in the VAB. 4 November 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
70-HC-1065 ( 213k )
Apollo 14 spacecraft being stacked in the VAB. November 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
70-H-1410 ( 169k )
Apollo 14 CSM being added to the stack. November 1970. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-70PC-657 ( 160k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-70P-494 ( 184k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
Rollout ( 186k )
The Apollo 14 Saturn V leaves the Vehicle Assembly Building during rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-672 ( 152k )
The Apollo 14 Saturn V leaves the Vehicle Assembly Building during rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
70-HC-1046 ( 293k )
Apollo 14 rollout viewed from VAB roof. 9 November 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S70-54121 ( 220k or 363k )
The Apollo 14 Saturn V leaves the Vehicle Assembly Building during rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-70PC-670 ( 114k )
The Apollo 14 Saturn V passes the Launch Control Center during rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-646 ( 164k or 1233k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V during rollout. 9 November 1970. Scans by Kipp Teague/J. L. Pickering.
S70-54119 ( 224k or 478k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V during rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-70PC-656 ( 203k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V during rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-657 ( 162k or 1005k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V during rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague / J. L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-642 ( 176k or 1129k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V during rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by J. L. Pickering/Kipp Teague.
KSC-70PC-662 ( 213k )
The Apollo 14 Saturn V approaches the MSS parking site during rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
70-HC-1045 ( 101k or 743k )
The Apollo 14 Saturn V on the Pad 39A incline during rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by Kipp Teague.
Saturn V on Incline ( 156k )
The Apollo 14 Saturn V on the Pad 39A incline during rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70PC-675 ( 124k or 960k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V on the pad following rollout. 9 November 1970. Scan by J. L. Pickering / Kipp Teague.
On the pad ( 142k )
View from the launch tower. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
Covered CM ( 218k )
View of the Command Module with its protective cover. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-70P-515 ( 134k )
View of firing room during Apollo 14 Flight Readiness Test. 10 December 1970. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
KSC-71PC-49 ( 146k )
Mobile Service Structure (MSS, left) rollback for the Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
S71-16790 ( 103k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V on pad at night during Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
S71-16792 ( 150k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V on pad at night during Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
S71-16795 ( 101k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V on pad at night during Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
S71-16796 ( 84k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V on pad at night during Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
S71-16797 ( 108k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V on pad at night during Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
S71-16798 ( 87k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V on pad at night during Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
S71-16799 ( 47k or 472k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V on pad at night during Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Research by J. L. Pickering.
KSC-71PC-69 ( 92k )
Apollo 14 Command Module and the White Room at night. January 1971. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
71-H-171 ( 200k or 469k )
The Mobile Service Structure is moved back from Apollo 14 following a successful Countdown Demonstration Test. 19 January 1971. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S71-16637 ( 144k )
Apollo 14 Plaque prior to installation on the ladder strut. January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71C-803 ( 147k )
Apollo 14 Plaque attached to the ladder strut, probably installed a few days prior to launch. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
KSC-71PC-70 ( 128k or 926k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V on pad 39-A at night. 31 January 1971. Scan by J. L. Pickering.
S71-16789 ( 113k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V on pad 39-A at night. 19? January 1971. Scan by .
Fueled-noID ( 123k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V on pad 39-A fueled. Scan by J. L. Pickering.

Saturn V Launch

KSC-71P-103 ( 161k )

View of the firing room just prior to Apollo 14 Saturn V ignition. 31 January 1971. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-71PC-153 ( 120k or 1165k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V ignition. 31 January 1971. Scan by Kipp Teague.
71-H-221 ( 75k or 594k )
Apollo 14 ignition. 31 January 1971. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S71-17620 ( 165k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V liftoff from a camera on the tower. 31 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71PC-106 ( 149k or 1176k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V liftoff from a fisheye camera on the tower. 31 January 1971. Research by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-71PC-189 ( 68k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V launch. 31 January 1971. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-71PC-152 ( 116k or 1006k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V climbs. 31 January 1971. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-71PC-195 ( 136k or 478k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V climbs. 31 January 1971. Research by J.L. Pickering.
71-H-267 ( 71k or 970k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V climbs. 31 January 1971. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S71-17621 ( 126k or 234k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V climbs. 31 January 1971. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-71PC-151 ( 108k or 983k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V climbs and yaws. 31 January 1971. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S71-18398 ( 120k or 274k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V climbs during liftoff. 31 January 1971. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-71PC-111 ( 100k )
Apollo 14 Saturn V climbs toward cloud layer. 31 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
AP14-CLOUDS-NOID ( 84k )
Dramatic view from an aircraft of Apollo 14 rising above the clouds. 31 January 1971. Scan by J.L Pickering.
71-H-106 ( 98k )
Backup Commander Gene Cernan is seated next to CapCom Gordon Fullerton at a console in the Mission Operations Control Room during the early moments of Apollo 14. 31 January 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.

Mission Support Photos

S71-16805 (84k)

At the time of Apollo 14, Glynn S. Lunney (lower right) was Head of the Flight Directors Office. He is shown here with Apollo 14 Flight Directors Gerald D. Griffin (Gold Team, lower left), M. Peter Frank (Orange Team, upper left), and Milton L. Windler (Maroon Team, upper right).
S71-17122 ( 112k or 472k )
Wide angle view of Mission Control duirng transposition and docking. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S71-19500 ( 108k or 299k )
View out the LMP's window during lift-off. This is a frame from the 16-mm film taken with the camera mounted above the window and looking down at a steep angle. Compare with AS14-66-9338 which was taken out the window by Ed Mitchell after PLSS jettison but not from as high or as steep an angle. 6 February 1971. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S71-18753 ( 144k or 384k )
The Apollo 14 Command Module approaches splashdown. 9 February 1971. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S71-19472 ( 183k )
The parachutes collapse as the weight of the Command Module is removed following splashdown. 9 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
Mission Photos by Magazine Number

Some images are currently available only as low-resolution scans provided by NASA Johnson in the mid-1990s. The individual scans have TARGA filenames. Markus Mehring has compiled cross-references between those filenames and the NASA photo ID designations customarily used. Other images are available as higher resolution scans from prints and, unless otherwise credited, were provided by Kipp Teague. Beginning in 2004, NASA began to provide scans from original film and, as they become available to the ALSJ, we are using them to replace all prior versions. The scans from original film were done at approximately 4000 by 4000 pixels and are presented at 300 dpi equivalent. They are labeled "OF300".

Magazine 64/LL (B&W) Frames 9046-9201

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

Magazine 64 was used by Al Shepard during EVA-2.


AS14-64-9046 (OF300) ( 310k or 1534k )
132:15:25 Close-up cross-Sun from the north of the double core at Station A. The double core is attached to an extension handle at the top.
AS14-64-9046/7 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 11 Mb or 481k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-64-9046/7 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3.6Mb or 472k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Kevin Frank.
AS14-64-9047 (OF300) ( 332k or 1566k )
Al stepped to his right to take this stereo companion to 9046.
AS14-64-9048 (OF300) ( 222k or 1221 )
Al has moved around the east of the core tube and has backed up to take this "locator" of the Station A core with the LM in the background. Note that the lower part of the Ascent stage and all of the Descent stage are hidden by intervening high ground.
AS14-64-9049 (OF300) ( 142k or 1070k )
132:34:22 Al has started a pan at Station B, starting with this down-Sun. the LM is on the left.
AS14-64-9050 (OF300) ( 125k or 948k )
Rightward of 9049, showing the inbound MET tracks.
AS14-64-9051 (OF300) ( 131k or 975k )
Rightward of 9050.
AS14-64-9052 (OF300) ( 144k or 972k )
Rightward of 9051, toward the north. Note the crater on the righthand side that is surrounded by fragmental ejecta.
AS14-64-9053 (OF300) ( 165k or 1036k )
Rightward of 9052, centered on the small crater with fragmental ejecta.
AS14-64-9054 (OF300) ( 154k or 948k )
Rightward of 9053, showing the MET at the lower right.
AS14-64-9055 (OF300) ( 163k or 981k )
132:34:22 Rightward of 9054, over the top of the MET. Beyond the DAC, we can see what appear to be two sets of Met tracks crossing at right angles. One set goes from left to right and is obviously the first set Al made. At about 132:33:32 when Ed thinks he may have spotted the planned Station B location, Al may have circled to his left to his left and have ended up crossing his own tracks on his way to the current MET location. See, also, the discussion of 9056.
AS14-64-9056 (OF300) ( 172k or 990k )
Rightward of 9055, over the MET, showing the smooth MET tracks near the MET's current location. In the background we can see disturbed soil almost as far as the partially buried boulder on the right. At that point, he seems to have circled to his left and conferred with Ed, possibly directly beyond the DAC., before crossing his own tracks toward the current MET location.
AS14-64-9057 (OF300) ( 198k or 1142k )
Rightward of 9056, MET and in-bound tracks.
AS14-64-9058 (OF300) ( 185k or 1074k )
Rightward of 9057, in-bound tracks.
AS14-64-9059 (OF300) ( 222k or 1369k )
132:34:22 Rightward of 9058. Ed is holding the map. Note that his Sun visor is up. He is wearing his RCU-mounted Hasselblad camera. Note the large boulders near the apparent horizon about half a fiducial spacing to the right of center. The azimuth to these boulders from Station B is about 30 degrees, which is approximately the direction of the nearest point on the Cone Crater rim.
AS14-64-9060 (OF300) ( 235k or 1465k )
Rightward of 9059, almost up-Sun showing a number of boulders.
AS14-64-9061 (OF300) ( 174k or 1194k )
Rightward of 9060, with little detail visible in the up-Sun glare.
AS14-64-9062 (OF300) ( 172k or 1226 )
Rightward of 9061, showing the Cone Crater ridge.
AS14-64-9063 (OF300) ( 171k or 1202k )
Rightward of 9062.
AS14-64-9064 (OF300) ( or)
Rightward of 9063.
AS14-64-9065 (OF300) ( 235k or 1267k )
Rightward of 9064, showing a group of large boulders at the right edge, southeast of their current location.
AS14-64-9066 (OF300) ( 211k or 1107k )
Rightward of 9065, showing the group of large boulders southeast of their current location.
AS14-64-9066/7 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 2.5 Mb or 217k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-64-9067 (OF300) ( 219k or 1174k )
Rightward of 9066, showing the western portion of the boulder group at Station B.
AS14-64-9068 (OF300) ( 209k or 1169k )
Rightward of 9067, toward the south.
AS14-64-9069 (OF300) ( 192k or 1102k )
Rightward of 9060, showing a large, angular boulder south of the MET.
AS14-64-9069/70 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 2.0 Mb or 194k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-64-9070 (OF300) ( 156k or 986k )
Rightward of 9069.
AS14-64-9071 (OF300) ( 152k or 1049k )
Rightward of 9070, showing the LM on the right. The descent stage is hidden by an intervening ridge, illustrating the problems they are having spotting landmarks.
AS14-64-9072 (OF300) ( 115k or 885k )
Rightward of 9071, toward the LM.
AS14-64-9073 (OF300) ( 253k or 1257k )
132:37:00 Al takes a stereopair of the grab sample at Station B. The first of the pair is out-of-focus or blurred.
AS14-64-9074 (OF300) ( 227k or 1208k )
Stereo companion to 9073.
AS14-64-9075 (OF300) ( 131k or 965k )
132:48:48 At Station B1, while Ed tries to figure out where they are, Al takes a pan, starting with this down-Sun. The LM is on the left.
AS14-64-9076 (OF300) ( 131k or 1001k )
Down-Sun similar to 9075.
AS14-64-9077 (OF300) ( 137k or 994k )
Rightward of 9076. Note the light-colored material near the local horizon and the rock near the right edge about halfway down from the centerline.
AS14-64-9078 (OF300) ( 152k or 1022 )
Rightward of 9077, centered on the rock noted in 9077.
AS14-64-9079 (OF300) ( 192k or 1172k )
Rightward of 9078.
AS14-64-9080 (OF300) ( 217k or 1222 )
Rightward of 9079, toward the north. Note how much they have come up hill since the start of the traverse.
AS14-64-9081 (OF300) ( 210k or 1162k )
Rightward of 9080. Note the group of boulders in the middle distance.
AS14-64-9082 (OF300) ( 227k or 1225k )
Rightward of 9081. Note the pair of craters with the very large boulder on the uphill rim of the uphill crater.
AS14-64-9083 (OF300) ( 183k or 1033k )
Rightward of 9082, showing a boulder on the right that appears even larger than the one noted in 9082.
AS14-64-9084 (OF300) ( 191k or 1067k )
Rightward of 9083, with part of Cone Crater Ridge on the right.
AS14-64-9085 (OF300) ( 169k or 1122k )
Rightward of 9084.
AS14-64-9086 (OF300) ( 161k or 1141k )
Rightward of 9085, up-Sun showing a crater with fragmental ejecta on the rim. Note the local ridge beyond that crater.
AS14-64-9087 (OF300) ( 178k or 1189k )
Rightward of 9086.
AS14-64-9088 (OF300) ( 168k or 1020k )
132:50:31 Rightward of 9087. Excellent picture of Ed from Al's Station B1 pan. Ed has his back to the camera, trying to figure out where they are.
AS14-64-9089 (OF300) ( 190k or 980k)
The next frame from Al's Station B1 pan, showing Ed studying the traverse map. This is one of the better known pictures taken during Apollo. Ed has turned, but is still trying to puzzle out where they are. This photograph is symbolic of the traverse as a whole. We can see Ed's camera handle and his tongs tethered on his left hip.
AS14-64-9090 (OF300) ( 229k or 1210k )
Rightward of 9089, showing the back of Ed's PLSS.
AS14-64-9090/1 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.8 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph by Yuri Krasilnikov.
AS14-64-9091 (OF300) ( 221k or 1237k)
Rightward of 9090. Old Nameless is to the left of center, mostly hidden by the local terrain.
AS14-64-9091/2 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.5 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph by Yuri Krasilnikov.
AS14-64-9092 (OF300) ( 199k or 1175k)
Rightward of 9091.
AS14-64-9093 (OF300) ( 144k or 932k)
Rightward of 9092, looking over the MET. Note that there aren't as many boulders visible in this direction as there were uphill of their current location. This picture is taken more or less toward the south so that shadows cast by any rocks in the scene would be visible.
AS14-64-9094 (OF300) ( 121k or 856k)
Rightward of 9093, across the top of the MET. The legs of the magnetometer tripod are sticking up just to the right of the 16-mm movie camera. Note that the MET carries a Hand Tool Carrier (HTC) virtually identical to the one used by the Apollo 12 crew.
AS14-64-9094/5 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 2.8 Mb or 174k)
Red-blue anaglyph by Erik van Meijgaarden.
AS14-64-9095 (OF300) ( 122k or 875k )
Rightward of 9094, over the top of the MET. Note the core caps on the top of the HTC. The LM is at the righthand edge.
AS14-64-9096 (OF300) ( 109k or 910k )
Rightward of 9095, centered on the LM.
AS14-64-9097 (OF300) ( 115k or 917k )
Rightward of 9096, down-Sun to the LM, showing the MET shadow.
AS14-64-9098 (OF300) ( 188k or 1137k )
133:23:40 Al takes an excellent pan at Station C-Prime, starting with this down-Sun. The LM is near the lefthand edge. Al and Ed are in the midst of a field of small boulders. As we now know, they are about 75 meters SE of the southern rim of Cone Crater. Note the split boulder at the righthand edge of the photograph.

In the high-resolution version, a small, light-colored object appears about half a fiducial spacing to the right of the LM and is probably the ALSEP Central Station. Using the USGS map ( 4.3 Mb ), we can calculated that the angular separation of the LM and Central Station as seen from Station C-Prime is about 3.8 degrees, which is consistent with the separation in this image.

AS14-64-9099 (OF300) ( 180k or 1074k )
133:23:40 Rightward of 9098. The Station C1 white boulder, now known as Saddle Rock, is on the local horizon to the right of center, as indicated in a detail.
AS14-64-9100 (OF300) ( 203k or 1198k )
Rightward of 9099, showing Saddle Rock just to the left of center.
AS14-64-9100/1 ( 3.5 Mb or 0.6 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-64-9101 (OF300) ( 211k or 1188k )
Rightward of 9100. The rim of Cone Crater is out of sight just to the right of center.
AS14-64-9101/2 ( 3.7Mb or 0.6 Mb )
These two frames from Al's Station C-Prime pan, taken after 133:23:40, show a group of boulders northwest of Al's location. The rim of Cone Crater is beyond the boulders to the right of center. This pair gives a view slightly to the right of 9100/1. Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore in 2006.

Compare with an earlier version ( 0.7 Mb ) produced by Jim Scotti in 2001.

AS14-64-9102 (OF300) ( 212k or 1187k )
Rightward of 9101, showing the large boulders off in the direction of the Cone Crater rim.
AS14-64-9102/3 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3.0Mb or 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.

Compare with an earlier version ( 0.8 Mb ) produced by Jim Scotti in 2001.

AS14-64-9103 (OF300) ( 230k or 1234k )
133:23:40 Rightward of 9102. This frame from Al's Station C-Prime pan shows the view to the north.
AS14-64-9103/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 2.9 Mb or 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-64-9104 (OF300) ( 238k or 1238k )
Rightward of 9103.
AS14-64-9104/5 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3.7 Mb or 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-64-9104/5 Red-Blue Anaglyph Detail ( 3.6Mb or 140k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Kevin Frank.
AS14-64-9105 (OF300) ( 262k or 1409k )
Rightward of 9104.
AS14-64-9105/6 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3.5 Mb or 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-64-9106 (OF300) ( 264k or 1390k )
Rightward of 9105, toward the northeast.
AS14-64-9106/7 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3.3 Mb or 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-64-9107 (OF300) ( 248k or 1231k )
Rightward of 9106.
AS14-64-9107/8 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3.4 Mb or 0.4 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-64-9108 (OF300) ( 245k or 1299k )
Rightward of 9107.
AS14-64-9109 (OF300) ( 168k or 1167k)
Rightward of 9108.
AS14-64-9110 (OF300) ( 182k or 1180k)
Rightward of 9109, up-Sun. Note that there aren't nearly as many boulders in this direction as in others. This photo shows that they are not at the highest point in the area and that the ground to the east of their present location is higher.
AS14-64-9111 (OF300) ( 169k or 1147k)
Rightward of 9110.
AS14-64-9111/2 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.3 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-64-9112 (OF300) ( 175k or 1107k)
Rightward of 9111.
AS14-64-9112/3 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.4 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-64-9113 (OF300) ( 176k or 1028k)
Rightward of 9112.
AS14-64-9113/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.5 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-64-9114 (OF300) ( 203k or 1050k)
Rightward of 9113. Notice the fairly large boulders in the middle distance, albeit not in the numbers or of the size of the boulders in the direction of the Cone rim.
AS14-64-9114/5 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.5 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-64-9115 (OF300) ( 225k or 1168k)
Rightward of 9114.
AS14-64-9115/6 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3.0 Mb or 314k)
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.

See, also, an alternate version (0.6 Mb) by Eric Jones.

AS14-64-9116 (OF300) ( 254k or 1364k )
133:23:40 Rightward of 9115. In this frame from Al's Station C-Prime pan, Old Nameless is beyond the local horizon to the right of center. Note the foreground, fragment-rich crater that has been punched into the local Cone Crater ejecta.
AS14-64-9116/7 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3.4 Mb or 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.

See, also, an alternate version (0.7 Mb) by Eric Jones.

AS14-64-9117 (OF300) ( 247k or 1281k )
133:23:40 Rightward of 9116. In this frame from Al's Station C-Prime pan shows the east wall of the fragment-rich crater.
AS14-64-9117/8 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.4 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-64-9118 (OF300) ( 207k or 1132k )
133:23:40 Rightward of 9117. This frame from Al's Station C-Prime shows the central portions of the fragment-rich crater. Research by Ed Hengeveld.
AS14-64-9118/9 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.4 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-64-9119 (OF300) ( 174k or 1002k )
Rightward of 9118, looking across the handle of the Gold camera.
AS14-64-9119/21 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.3 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-64-9120 (OF300) ( 141k or 898k )
133:23:40 Rightward of 9119. In this frame from Al's Station C-Prime pan shows Ed at the front of the MET with his back to us. His upper sunshield is raised and the LM is just to the right of the sunshield tab. The ALSEP farther right. The close-up stereocamera is on the lefthand side of the MET. The west wall of the fragment-rich crater is on the left beyond Ed.

Erik van Meijgaarden has combined frames 9117 to 9120 in a mini-pan.

AS14-64-9121 (OF300) ( 149k or 897k )
133:23:40 Ed has moved out of the way and this picture gives us good detail of the front of the MET, including the triangular handle brace, the 16-mm camera, and the gnomon. The dustbrush that the astronauts use to dust themselves after each of the EVAs is hanging below the 16-mm camera on the right side of the MET. This brush is identical to the ones flown on the later missions. The white box attached to the side of the camera farthest from us is the battery pack. Training photo S70-34414 shows the battery pack and cables in more detail.
AS14-64-9122 (OF300) ( 139k or 913k )
133:23:47 This down-Sun completes Al's C-Prime pan.
AS14-64-9123 (OF300) ( 291k or 1339k )
133:31:19 Al takes a stereopair of the double core at Station C-Prime. Both are taken cross-Sun to the south. Along the upper edge, we can see the fragment-rich crater that Al photographed in his pan. See AS14-64-9118.
AS14-64-9123/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 9Mb or 388k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Kevin Frank.
AS14-64-9123/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3.8 Mb or 0.4 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-64-9124 (OF300) ( 304k or 1407k )
Al steps to his right to take this stereo companion of 9124.
AS14-64-9125 (OF300) ( 333k or 1465k )
133:35:48 Al took a stereopair of his sampling area at station C-Prime.
AS14-64-9125/6 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 2.5 Mb or 433k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-64-9126 (OF300) ( 318k or 1398k )
Al stepped to his left to take this stereo companion to 9125.
AS14-64-9127 (OF300) ( 279k or 1232k )
Al took this "after" photograph of the spot from which he took a sample from a small secondary impact. The spot is just up-Sun of the gnomon nearest the camera.
AS14-64-9128 (OF300) ( 293k or 1333k )
133:43:30 This photo documents the football-sized rock that Al collected near Saddle Rock.
AS14-64-9128/9 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.8 Mb or 350k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-64-9129 (OF300) ( 277k or 1258k )
Al stepped to his left to take this stereo companion to 9128.
AS14-64-9130 (OF300) ( 273k or 1357k )
133:51:57 "Before" photo of Filleted Rock at Station C2. Old Nameless is out of focus at the top of the frame, to the right of center.
AS14-64-9130/1 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 9Mb or 264k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Kevin Frank.
AS14-64-9131 (OF300) ( 233k or 1201k )
Filleted Rock at Station C2, showing Ed's feet and Old Nameless.
AS14-64-9132 (OF300) ( 267k or 1208k )
Al has stepped around Ed to get this cross-Sun of Filleted Rock at Station C2.
AS14-64-9133 (OF300) ( 297k or 1346k )
Filleted Rock at Station C2. The sample location may be at the lower left.
AS14-64-9134 (OF300) ( 162k or 1034k )
134:04:53 During the traverse to Station F, Al made a short detour to this large boulder while Ed continued on with the MET. Al had planned to step behind a large boulder - one bigger than himself - to see if there was any effect on communications with Ed or with Houston, but this boulder proved to be too small for the experiment. Before rejoining Ed, he did take three photographs of the boulder. This boulder is known as Weird Rock, after nearby Weird Crater. Note that Al has not changed focus since taking 9133, so all three photos of Weird Rock are out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9135 (OF300) ( 181k or 1041k )
134:04:53 Al's close-up of Weird Rock. The rock is visible on the map at CQ.9/74.3. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9136 (OF300) ( 167k or 969k )
Weird Rock near Weird Crater. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9137 (OF300) ( 110k or 916k )
134:07:18 After rejoining Ed at Station F, Al takes a pan, starting with this down-Sun toward the LM. Al has still not changed focal setting, so all frames in the pan are badly out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9138 (OF300) ( 113k or 883k )
Rightward of 9137, showing Ed at the MET. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9139 (OF300) ( 112k or 908k )
Ed at the MET. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9140 (OF300) ( 113k or 860k )
134:07:18 Frame from Al's Station F pan, showing Ed at the MET. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9141 (OF300) ( 121k or 906k )
Rightward of 9140. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9142 (OF300) ( 142k or 974k )
Rightward of 9141, showing some MET tracks. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9143 (OF300) ( 139k or 946k )
Rightward of 9142. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9144 (OF300) ( 144k or 940k )
Rightward of 9143. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9145 (OF300) ( 142k or 910k )
Rightward of 9144. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9146 (OF300) ( 139k or 922k )
Rightward of 9145, showing Weird Rock. Note that the MET tracks don't go close to the rock. As mentioned in the text, Al went over to the rock to try a communications test and then, after taking some close-ups of the rock, rejoined Ed, who had gone on ahead. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9147 (OF300) ( 143k or 1038k )
Rightward of 9146, showing Weird Rock which is east of Station F. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9148 (OF300) ( 147k or 1082k )
Rightward of 9147, up-Sun. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9149 (OF300) ( 145k or 1068k )
Rightward of 9148. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9150 (OF300) ( 139k or 1000k )
Rightward of 9149, toward the northeast. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9151 (OF300) ( 140k or 956k )
Rightward of 9150, showing Old Nameless, out-of-focus, to the right of center.
AS14-64-9152 (OF300) ( 160k or 996k )
Rightward of 9151. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9153 (OF300) ( 144k or 950k )
Rightward of 9152. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9154 (OF300) ( 126k or 895k )
Rightward of 9153. This picture shows the view to the south and the object on the horizon at the right is a boulder and not the LM. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9155 (OF300) ( 107k or 849k )
Rightward of 9154. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9156 (OF300) ( 105k or 866k )
Rightward of 9155. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9157 (OF300) ( 99k or 849k )
134:07:48 Rightward of 9156, ending Al's Station F pan. Out-of-focus.
AS14-64-9158 (OF300) ( 337k or 1562k )
134:15:34 "Before" photo of the Station G trench site, taken from the northeast. Good focus.
AS14-64-9159 (OF300) ( 313k or 1491k )
Al has stepped to his left to take this stereo companion to 9158.
AS14-64-9160 (OF300) ( 244k or 1297k )
134:27:54 "After" photo of the Station G trench.
AS14-64-9161 (OF300) ( 256k or 1287k )
134:36:42 Second image in a stereopair Al took of the Station G trench. He stepped to his left between frames. Every other trench that the Apollo astronauts dug on the Moon held vertical walls. For some reason, this one would not, except near the left end.
AS14-64-9161/3 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 2.0 Mb or 242k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erik van Meijgaarden.
AS14-64-9162 (OF300) ( 206k or 1290k )
Al has stepped to his right to take this "after" photo of his Station G trench, but was moving while he was taking it.
AS14-64-9163 (OF300) ( 228k or 1301k )
Al stepped to his left to take this stereo companion to 9162.
AS14-64-9164 (OF300) ( 264k or 1352k )
Al has gone around to the south side of the Station G trench to take a cross-Sun of his handiwork. Notice on the east end of the south side what may be a knee imprint.
AS14-64-9165 (OF300) ( 281k or 1425k )
Stereo companion to 9164.
AS14-64-9166 (OF300) ( 180k or 1152k href="20149580.jpg" title="image" target="new">k )
Down-sun of the Station G trench.
AS14-64-9167 (OF300) ( 103k or 779k )
134:36:26 or) Al's Station G pan starts with this down-Sun toward the LM. Good focus.
AS14-64-9168 (OF300) ( 101k or 752k )
Rightward of 9167.
AS14-64-9169 (OF300) ( 117k or 894k )
Rightward of 9168.
AS14-64-9170 (OF300) ( 125k or 806k )
Rightward of 9169, toward the north, gives an impression of the undulations of the local terrain.
AS14-64-9171 (OF300) ( 156k or 998k )
Rightward of 9170.
AS14-64-9172 (OF300) ( 159k or 977k )
Rightward of 9171.
AS14-64-9173 (OF300) ( 157k or 977k )
134:36:42 Rightward of 9172, showing Ed at the MET and a mostly empty core-cap dispenser at center. The northern portion of the Cone Crater ridge is in the background.
AS14-64-9174 (OF300) ( 159k or 1025k )
134:36:42 Rightward of 9173, showing Ed at the MET. Cone Ridge is in the background on the left. Part of the MET track is on the extreme right. Note the 16-mm movie camera mounted on the MET in front of Ed on the right side.
AS14-64-9175 (OF300) ( 154k or 1102k )
Rightward of 9174, showing the view just a little counter-clockwise from up-Sun. We see more of the Cone Crater ridge and some well-defined up-Sun MET tracks showing their meandering path. This view shows the the difficulties they would have had identifying landmarks on the trip up to Cone.
AS14-64-9176 (OF300) ( 155k or 1164k )
Up-Sun, with MET tracks. The footprints are not prominent. See a discussion of the brightness of the MET tracks by Jay Windley.
AS14-64-9177 (OF300) ( 163k or 1173k )
Rightward of 9176, showing some footprints going away from the MET to the right.
AS14-64-9178 (OF300) ( 161k or 1157k )
Rightward of 9177, showing Ed's footprints at the core site.
AS14-64-9179 (OF300) ( 202k or 1250k )
Rightward of 9178.
AS14-64-9180 (OF300) ( 187k or 1104k )
Rightward of 9179, with Old Nameless is partially obscured by local terrain to the right of center..
AS14-64-9181 (OF300) ( 183k or 1076k )
Rightward of 9180, centered on Old Nameless.
AS14-64-9182 (OF300) ( 172k or 1034k )
Rightward of 9181.
AS14-64-9183 (OF300) ( 175k or 1043k )
Rightward of 9182.
AS14-64-9184 (OF300) ( 149k or 948k )
Rightward of 9183, looking toward the south.
AS14-64-9185 (OF300) ( 124k or 805k )
Rightward of 9184, showing Al's trench in the foreground. Note that the gnomon has been knocked over. The color chart/gray scale is down on the ground.
AS14-64-9186 (OF300) ( 114k or 805k )
Rightward of 9185.
AS14-64-9187 (OF300) ( 101k or 848k )
134:36:42 Rightward of 9186, ending Al's Station G pan. The Ascent Stage, only, is visible on the righthand side.
AS14-64-9188 (OF300) ( 148k or 977k )
134:49:38 Al's down-Sun "before" of the Station G2 documented sample site. He is aimed high enough to get the LM in the picture and, thereby, to permit a location estimate. The ALSEP Central Station and the Mortar pack can be seen in the distance beyond the LM.
AS14-64-9189 (OF300) ( 100k or 698k )
135:03:42 This is the first in a series of pictures of the Earth Al took at the LM at the end of EVA-2. This photo shows more of the LM than the other pictures in the series. Journal Contributor Danny Ross Lunsford notes that Al has captured Venus over Antares in all the pictures.
AS14-64-9189/90 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 2.5 Mb or 176k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erik van Meijgaarden.
AS14-64-9190 (OF300) ( 98k or 691k )
Similar to 9189.
AS14-64-9190/7 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 11Mb or 216k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Kevin Frank.
AS14-64-9191 (OF300) ( 90k or 671k )
Similar to 9189.
AS14-64-9192 (OF300) ( 94k or 685k )
Similar to 9189.
AS14-64-9193 (OF300) ( 90k or 666k )
Similar to 9189.
AS14-64-9194 (OF300) ( 92k or 666k )
Similar to 9189.
AS14-64-9195 (OF300) ( 90k or 695k )
Similar to 9189.
AS14-64-9196 (OF300) ( 93k or 701k )
Similar to 9189.
AS14-64-9197 (OF300) ( 107k or 774k )
Similar to 9189.
AS14-64-9198 (OF300) ( 152k or 1040k )
135:04:57 This photo shows the sunlit face of the Solar Wind Collector. The picture was taken from the northeast and is the best of the series of four. Note that the word 'Sun' is printed at the bottom of the collector.
AS14-64-9199 (OF300) ( 120k or 849k )
Similar to 9198.
AS14-64-9200 (OF300) ( 87k or 686k )
Similar to 9199, but showing the top of the SWC.
AS14-64-9201 (OF300) ( 118k or 844k )
Al has backed up to take this final picture of the SWC. This is the last of the EVA-2 pictures.

Magazine 65/KK (B&W) Frames 9202-9215

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

Magazine 65 contains 14 pictures taken out the LM window after the landing.


AS14-65-9202 (OF300) ( 131k or 995k )
109:46:23 Frame from a pre-EVA-1 LMP window pan. Turtle Rock is just to the right of center.
AS14-65-9203 (OF300) ( 193k or 1256k )
Over Ed's thruster.
AS14-65-9204 (OF300) ( 164k or 1030k )
Center of Ed's window.
AS14-65-9205 (OF300) ( 239k or 1423k )
Over Ed's thruster.
AS14-65-9206 (OF300) ( 210k or 1240k )
Near surface photo on Ed's side showing streaking going away from the Descent Engine.
AS14-65-9207 (OF300) ( 129k or 1017k )
Leftward of 9206.
AS14-65-9208 (OF300) ( 204k or 1290k )
Toward Ed's thrusters. Shows some lines of boulders.
AS14-65-9209 (OF300) ( 175k or 1193k )
LM shadow from Al's window. The spacecraft is rotated right. Depressed slightly below the horizon and shows the surface at middle distance.
AS14-65-9210 (OF300) ( 131k or 992k )
Same direction as 9209, but pointed higher to show the horizon.
AS14-65-9211 (OF300) ( 101k or 857k )
Down-Sun with the dramatic washout.
AS14-65-9212 (OF300) ( 73k or 746k )
Slightly clockwise from down-Sun.
AS14-65-9213 (OF300) ( 83k or 787k )
Similar to 9212, with the scribe marks on Al's window out of focus.
AS14-65-9214 (OF300) ( 121k or 929k )
Leftward of 9213 with half of the LM shadow on the right side.
AS14-65-9215 (OF300) ( 86k or 787k )
Down-Sun near-surface. Note that there are relatively few rocks, at least in the near field. There are more out Ed's side.

Magazine 66/II (Color) Frames 9216-9360

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

This magazine was used by both Ed Mitchell and Al Shepard during EVA-1. The first 13 frames were taken in lunar orbit before the landing. Ed Mitchell then took two photos of Al Shepard from inside the LM and two outside on the surface. Shepard then used the magazine for the rest of EVA-1.


AS14-66-9216 (OF300) ( 76k or 863k )
CSM with the lunar surface below it, from the LM.
AS14-66-9217 (OF300) ( 77k or 818k )
Similar to 9216.
AS14-66-9218 (OF300) ( 79k or 814k )
Similar to 9216.
AS14-66-9219 (OF300) ( 75k or 817k )
Similar to 9216.
AS14-66-9220 (OF300) ( 75k or 814k )
Similar to 9216.
AS14-66-9221 (OF300) ( 76k or 795k )
Similar to 9216.
AS14-66-9222 (OF300) ( 76k or 783k )
Similar to 9216.
AS14-66-9223 (OF300) ( 78k or 766k )
Similar to 9216.
AS14-66-9224 (OF300) ( 84k or 652k )
Earthrise from the LM on Rev 14. The prominent foreground crater is Meitner, which has a diameter of 87 km. Journal Contributor Henri Partanen notes that the photos in this sequence are very similar to an Apollo 12 earthrise series that starts with AS12-47-6879. Those photos were also taken at AOS just prior to descent initiation. Because the Apollo 12 and 14 landing sites are both equatorial and are only separated by about 10 degrees of longitude, the orbital planes are similar. A comparison of Celestia images of the Moon as viewed from Earth at the time of the two landings shows that the Moon was in similar libration states. Consequently, the views at AOS should be much the same. See, also, a labeled version ( 2.7 Mb ) by René Cantin.

ER*, the online nickname of an anonymous ALSJ contributor and member of Russian-language forums IXBT and Airbase, calls attention to an image of Venus in each of the five frames of the Earthrise sequence, 9224 to 9228. Details from the five frames have been combined as a PDF document, with each image cropped to put Venus and the crescent Earth at the same location. Thanks to Yuri Krasilnikov for calling attention to ER*'s discovery.

AS14-66-9225 (OF300) ( 88k or 684k )
Similar to 9224.
AS14-66-9226 (OF300) ( 96k or 764k )
Similar to 9224.
AS14-66-9227 (OF300) ( 96k or 772k )
Similar to 9224.
AS14-66-9228 (OF300) ( 92k or 752k )
Similar to 9224.

The next four frames were taken of Al Shepard by Ed Mitchell: two pictures from inside the LM and two out on the surface.


AS14-66-9229 (OF300) ( 127k or 836k )
113:52:32 Ed took this photo of Al out the right-hand, LMP window. Al is shading his eyes, probably looking up toward Cone Crater. Note the red stripe on the top of Al's helmet. This and similar stripes on his arms and legs help distinguish him from Ed, who has no stripes.
Watch Detail (OF300) ( 222k )
Lennie Waugh has captured a detail which gives us an excellent view of Al's Omega Speedmaster Watch, which reads approximately 9:00. Waugh notes that the picture was taken at about transcript time of 113:52. This time does not reflect a 40 minute 2.9 second mission clock update performed at 54:53:36 but, rather, is the time since the actual launch at 21:03 GMT/UTC on 31 January 1971. Consequently, the photo was taken at about 14:55 GMT/UTC on 5 February, or 08:55 US Central Standard Time. The astronauts kept their watches on Houston time, as confirmed by this detail.
AS14-66-9230 (OF300) ( 121k or 842k )
113:52:32 Ed took this photo of Al out the right-hand, LMP window. Al is shading his eyes, probably looking up toward Cone Crater. Note the red stripe on the top of Al's helmet. This and similar stripes on his arms and legs help distinguish him from Ed, who has no stripes. This photo provides good views of Al's cuff checklist, his Omega watch, and the strap-on pocket on his left thigh.
AS14-66-9231 (OF300) ( 88k or 720k )
114:44:02 Down-Sun Al at the U.S. flag. S-Band antenna shadow, Ed's shadow, the LM shadow. Al's OPS antenna is up.
AS14-66-9232 (OF300) ( 85k or 707k )
114:44:39 This is one of two tourist pictures of Al Shepard taken after deployment of the U.S. flag. Before taking this series, they turned the flag so that it was face on to the 16-mm DAC mounted on the MET. After they finished taking these three tourist pictures, they turned the flag so it was face on to the TV camera. See a discussion following 131:09:18.

At this point Ed passed the camera to Al Shepard. Note that unlike on Apollo 11 and Apollo 12 there are no pictures of the LMP descending the ladder.


AS14-66-9233 (OF300) ( 89k or 732k )
114:45:46 Down-Sun portrait of Ed at the U.S. flag. Note that the top flap of the strap-on pocket on his left thigh is open and we can see the Velcro strips on the inside suface that mate with corresponding strips on the front of the pocket to keep the top flap secure.
AS14-66-9234 (OF300) ( 273k or 1293k )
114:53:38 This photo shows the north footpad, which has dug into the surface. The LM was moving from left to right at touchdown, as indicated by the skid mark on the lefthand side and the mound pushed up on the righthand side. The bent landing probe is beyond the footpad.
AS14-66-9234-5 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.9 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Yuri Krasilnikov.
AS14-66-9235 (OF300) ( 241k or 1160k )
North footpad.
AS14-66-9236 (OF300) ( 101k or 830k )
Al starts a pan from the 4 o'clock position, northeast of the LM. This first frame is a down-Sun.
AS14-66-9236-37 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9237 (OF300) ( 88k or 809k )
Rightward from 9236, showing the S-Band antenna cover which, at the end of the EVA, they will put on top of the MET to keep it from overheating during the rest period.
AS14-66-9237-38 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9238 (OF300) ( 90k or 753k )
Rightward from 9237.
AS14-66-9238-39 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9239 (OF300) ( 112k or 851k )
Rightward from 9238.
AS14-66-9239-40 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.4 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9240 (OF300) ( 129k or 889k )
114:53:38 Al took this photo while facing slightly west of north. Ed is doing a TV pan and has the TV pointed toward the southwest. The large background rock to the left of Ed and above and to the left of the central fiducial is Turtle Rock, which Ed will visit at the end of EVA-2. Frame AS14-68-9475 is a close-up of Turtle Rock that Ed will take at the end of EVA-2.
AS14-66-9240-41 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.5 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9241 (OF300) ( 134k or 934k )
114:53:38 Rightward of 9240, showing Ed doing his TV pan.
AS14-66-9241-42 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.4 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9242 (OF300) ( 147k or 987k )
Rightward of 9241. As Al turns, the heavily crated surface becomes apparent. The "weathered" look of the surface is evidence that these features are quite old. Note that Ed has changed the pointing of the TV.
AS14-66-9242-43 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.5 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9243 (OF300) ( 184k or 1224k )
Looking to the northeast, the Sun angle makes it easy to see the texture of the surface in the foreground.
AS14-66-9243-44 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.5 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9244 (OF300) ( 168k or 1088k )
As Al turns further east, the objective of EVA-2, Cone Crater, can be seen in the distance on the right.
AS14-66-9244-45 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.6 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9245 (OF300) ( 171k or 1102k )
Rightward of 9244.
AS14-66-9246 (OF300) ( 79k or 565k )
Rightward of 9245, slightly left of up-Sun with considerable Sun glare.
AS14-66-9247 (OF300) ( 89k or 604k )
Rightward of 9246, up-Sun showing the Cone Crater ridge.
AS14-66-9248 (OF300) ( 95k or 632k )
Rightward of 9247.
AS14-66-9249 (OF300) ( 147k or 989k )
Rightward of 9248, with numerous rock and crater shadows.
AS14-66-9249-50 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.4 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9250 (OF300) ( 169k or 1169k )
Rightward of 9249.
AS14-66-9250-51 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.6 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9251 (OF300) ( 173k or 1211k )
Rightward of 9250. Old Nameless is completely hidden by local terrain.
AS14-66-9251-52 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.5 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9252 (OF300) ( 167k or 1192k )
Rightward of 9251, showing the east footpad with it's bent probe.
AS14-66-9252-53 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.4 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9253 (OF300) ( 168k or 1090k )
Rightward of 9252, showing the northeast of the LM.
AS14-66-9253-54 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.6 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9254 (OF300) ( 194k or 1151k )
114:53:38 Frame from Al's 4 o'clock pan. Right side and aft section of the LM, looking south. An excellent picture of the LM with many structural details are visible. The area under, and slightly behind the engine bell shows evidence of disturbed soil resulting from the Descent Engine exhaust. Also visible in the crater next to the rear (-Z) footpad is the track made by the probe as it scraped across the surface. The right (+Y) footpad has dug into the soft rim of a crater, causing the LM to slide slightly. Refer, also, to AS14-66-9269, a view of the left (-Y) footpad to see more evidence of this northward slide.

The lightweight construction of the LM is apparent in this picture. Minor buckling of panels covering the aft equipment bay and right side of the LM are visible. Notice also thermal damage done to the RCS plume deflectors. The extensive use of gold tape to secure the black insulation blankets can be seen.

AS14-66-9255 (OF300) ( 188k or 1112k )
114:53:38 View of the right side of the LM, and the right (+Y) strut in particular. The footpad is buried in the crater rim, and scrape marks of the probe are visible at the very top of the crater rim. The cosmic ray experiment package is attached to the lower part of the landing gear strut. Forward of the strut is the MESA (partially in shadow) and the S-Band antenna is at the far right of the picture. A labeled detail shows a helium vent associated with the descent stage oxidizer tanks as well and five others. See a discussion in the Apollo 11 Mobility chapter.

Erik van Meijgaarden has combined 9254 and 9255 as a 4 o'clock portrait of the LM.

AS14-66-9255-56 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.6 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9256 (OF300) ( 150k or 998k )
This is a good down-Sun portrait of the S-Band antenna. The MESA is beyond the strut at the left edge of the picture.
AS14-66-9256-57 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.4 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9257 (OF300) ( 96k or 806k )
Looking west-southwest, the last picture in this pan shows the S-Band antenna and the flag directly behind it. Towards the right side of the picture, the glare of the Sun at its zero phase point washes out many of the details of the surface. The flag is pointing on a azimuth of about 120. See a discussion following 131:09:18.
AS14-66-9258 (OF300) ( 221k or 1205k )
114:53:38 Al took this picture of the north footpad after finishing the 4 o'clock pan. Note the pile of dirt pushed up by final spacecraft motions.
AS14-66-9258/9 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 5Mb or 756k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Kevin Frank.
AS14-66-9259 (OF300) ( 221k or 1226k )
Al has turned counter-clockwise, showing the area under the engine bell.
AS14-66-9260 (OF300) ( 204k or 1190k )
East footpad.
AS14-66-9261 (OF300) ( 212k or 1195k )
114:53:38 Close-up under the engine bell showing the rock and the sweep pattern. Notice that there seem to be a number of cobbles. The shield that protects the landing radar from the exhaust is to the left of the bell.
AS14-66-9262 (OF300) ( 224k or 1202k )
Cobbles in the sweep pattern made by the descent plume. In this picture, we can see all the way under the LM to the south footpad. Just to the left of the engine bell is a shield which protects the landing radar from the engine exhaust.
AS14-66-9263 (OF300) ( 225k or 1195k )
View under the spacecraft showing the cobbles in the sweep pattern.
AS14-66-9264 (OF300) ( 239k or 1230k )
Close-up of the east footpad. In comparison with the area around the north footpad, there is very little surface disturbance around this footpad.
AS14-66-9265 (OF300) ( 247k or 1298k )
114:53:38 Close-up of the minus-Z (east) footpad. The probe may have first struck the surface on the far side of the small crater at the upper left.
AS14-66-9266 (OF300) ( 238k or 1202k )
View under the engine bell from the south. Note the cobble area in the foreground.
AS14-66-9266/7 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 4Mb or 324k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Kevin Frank.
AS14-66-9267 (OF300) ( 240k or 1185k )
Under the engine bell.
AS14-66-9268 (OF300) ( 226k or 1130k )
Under the engine bell.
AS14-66-9269 (OF300) ( 191k or 1069k )
114:53:38 Close-up of the minus-Y (south) footpad taken from the east. Note the bent landing probe sticking out to the left and the footpad imprint which indicates that the footpad first hit south of its present location and then, as the spacecraft began to tilt northward, the footpad slid north to its final resting place.
AS14-66-9270 (OF300) ( 178k or 980k )
Close-up of the south footpad.
AS14-66-9271 (OF300) ( 80k or 810k )
114:53:34 Al has started a pan from the 8 o'clock position, southeast of the LM near the Solar Wind Composition experiment (SWC). This first picture shows the down-Sun view with the SWC shadow at the right.
AS14-66-9272 (OF300) ( 87k or 833k )
Rightward of 9271. This second photo in the pan shows the view slightly north of west. The Solar Wind Collector is on the right side of the picture, between Al's shadow and the LM shadow.
AS14-66-9273 (OF300) ( 84k or 784k )
Rightward of 9272, centered on the SWC.
AS14-66-9274 (OF300) ( 103k or 859k )
Rightward of 9273, SWC and most of the LM shadow.
AS14-66-9275 (OF300) ( 113k or 944k )
Rightward of 9274, LM shadow and Turtle Rock.
AS14-66-9276 (OF300) ( 172k or 900k )
Rightward of 9275, LM shadow, ladder, U.S. flag, S-Band antenna shadow. The LRRR (Laser Ranging Retro-Reflector) is in the west footpad, waiting for Al to carry it out to the ALSEP deployment site. By illuminating the LRRR with laser pulses and measuring the time of return, experimenters on Earth can accurately measure the distance between their telescope and the LRRR and, over time, do such marvelous things as test Einstein's theory of General Relativity and look for evidence of crustal motions in the Moon. To the right of the LRRR, we see a second ALSEP package. Notice the craters to the West and North that Al narrowly avoided. The flag is full face to the TV camera, pointing on an azimuth of about 120. See a discussion following 131:09:18.
AS14-68-9276/7 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 21Mb or 432k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Kevin Frank.
AS14-68-9276/7 Red-Blue Anaglyph Detail ( 14Mb or 184k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Kevin Frank.
AS14-66-9277 (OF300) ( 208k or 1000k )
114:53:38 Rightward of 9276. This frame from Al's 8 o'clock pan, taken at the start of EVA-1, gives a full view of the left rear quadrant of the spacecraft. In this picture, we see the ALSEP storage area (the lower half of the area wrapped in black insulation blankets). The cask containing the hot fuel element for the RTG is to the left of the ALSEP storage bay. The white panel below the RTG cask, and underneath the Descent Stage, shields the landing radar from the heat of the Descent Engine. The landing radar itself is slightly above and to the right of the panel, and is wrapped in silver foil.
AS14-66-9278 (OF300) ( 216k or 1100k )
Rightward of 9277. Plume damage to the RCS deflectors is visible, as are the louvers on the underside of the aft equipment bay of the LM. The slender antenna sticking up from the back of the LM with downward-opening cone at the top is the EVA antenna.
AS14-66-9279 (OF300) ( 212k or 1500k )
Rightward of 9278.
AS14-66-9280 (OF300) ( 156k or 1057k )
Rightward of 9279, showing most of the Cone Crater ridge north of the crater.
AS14-66-9281 (OF300) ( 90k or 620k )
Rightward of 9280, the ridge is lost in Sun glare.
AS14-66-9282 (OF300) ( 81k or 611k )
Rightward of 9281, up-Sun.
AS14-66-9283 (OF300) ( 87k or 623k )
Rightward of 9282, with considerable glare.
AS14-66-9284 (OF300) ( 102k or 704k )
Rightward of 9283.
AS14-66-9285 (OF300) ( 157k or 1097k )
Rightward of 9284, with Old Nameless to the right of center.
AS14-66-9286 (OF300) ( 181k or 1277k )
Rightward of 9285, directly toward a crater that is southwest of the landing site.
AS14-66-9287 (OF300) ( 178k or 1260k )
Rightward of 9286. The crew described the landing site as being in a bowl; and this photograph shows a portion of the ridge that forms the local horizon.
AS14-66-9288 (OF300) ( 163k or 1145k )
Rightward of 9287.
AS14-66-9289 (OF300) ( 141k or 1036k )
Rightward of 9288.
AS14-66-9290 (OF300) ( 145k or 1101k ) AS14-66-9291 (OF300) ( 114k or 976k ) AS14-66-9292 (OF300) ( 103k or 900k ) AS14-66-9293 (OF300) ( 80k or 827k )
114:53:38 This down-Sun photo is the final frame is Al's 8 o'clock pan and demonstrates the extreme washout at zero phase.
AS14-66-9294 (OF300) ( 91k or 875k )
Al has move to the 12 o'clock position, due west of the ladder, to take a third pan. Down-sun.
AS14-66-9294-95 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9295 (OF300) ( 114k or 970k )
Rightward of 9294.
AS14-66-9295-96 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9296 (OF300) ( 98k or 922k )
Rightward of 9295.
AS14-66-9296-97 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9297 (OF300) ( 112k or 1000k )
Rightward of 9296.
AS14-66-9297-98 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9298 (OF300) ( 128k or 1066k )
Rightward of 9297, toward Turtle Rock.
AS14-64-9298/9 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9299 (OF300) ( 135k or 1054k )
Rightward of 9298.
AS14-64-9299/300 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.4 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-64-9299/301 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.1 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9300 (OF300) ( 136k or 1112k )
Rightward of 9299, showing the western tip of Ed's shadow.
AS14-66-9301 (OF300) ( 156k or 1213k )
Ed is still doing a TV pan. Note the ridge behind him, still partially in shadow. Cone Crater is on a portion of this ridge that is off the picture to the right, virtually up-Sun (east) of the landing site.
AS14-64-9301/2 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 101k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Patrick Vantuyne.
AS14-64-9301/2 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.5 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9302 (OF300) ( 158k or 1180k )
114:57:20 Frame from Al's 12 o'clock pan showing Ed doing a TV pan and, in the distance, considerable detail of the Cone Crater ridge. We can see Ed's footprints leading out to the TV site. As is usual for soil disturbances near the LM, the soil along Ed's track is darkened.
AS14-64-9302/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9303 (OF300) ( 86k or 659k )
Rightward of 9302, showing Ed, the U.S. flag, the S-Band antenna.
AS14-66-9304 (OF300) ( 136k or 917k )
Up-Sun, but without a great deal of glare, perhaps because part of the LM shadow may be falling on Al's camera lens. Without the sun glare, we can see some detail on the Cone Crater ridge. Flag, S-Band antenna, ladder, the LRRR in the west footpad.
AS14-66-9305 (OF300) ( 125k or 881k )
114:57:20 Similar to 9304. Up-Sun from Al's 12 o'clock pan taken near the LM at the start of EVA-1. There is relatively little glare, perhaps because part of the LM shadow may be falling on Al's camera lens. Without the Sun glare, we can see some detail on the Cone-Crater ridge. Flag, S-Band antenna, ladder, the LRRR in the west footpad.
AS14-64-9305/6 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.4 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-68-9305/6 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 9Mb or 0.9 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Kevin Frank.
AS14-66-9306 (OF300) ( 114k or 867k )
114:57:20 Rightward of 9305, centered just to the right of the hatch. The sun is mostly obscured by the LM, but there is enough glare to obscure most of the detail in the scene. Note the TV cable emerging from the left side of the MESA.

David Harland has combined 9305 and 9306 as a mini pan with Cone Ridge just to the left of the spacecraft.

AS14-64-9306/7 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.4 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9307 (OF300) ( 123k or 1017k )
Rightward of 9306.
AS14-64-9307/9 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9308 (OF300) ( 125k or 1004k )
Rightward of 9307, showing the SWC with Old Nameless in the distance.
AS14-66-9309 (OF300) ( 152k or 1170k )
Rightward of 9308, centered on the SWC.
AS14-64-9309/10 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.4 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9310 (OF300) ( 154k or 1180k )
Rightward of 9309, showing the ridge to the south of the LM.
AS14-64-9310/1 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.6 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9311 (OF300) ( 139k or 1154k )
Rightward of 9310.
AS14-64-9311/2 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.6 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9312 (OF300) ( 139k or 1080k )
Rightward of 9311.
AS14-64-9312/3 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9313 (OF300) ( 124k or 1007k )
Rightward of 9312.
AS14-64-9313/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9314 (OF300) ( 97k or 925k )
Rightward of 9313.
AS14-64-9314/5 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS14-66-9315 (OF300) ( 60k or 741k )
Rightward of 9314.
AS14-66-9316 (OF300) ( 66k or 799k )
114:59:49 Down-Sun. The last frame in Al's 12 o'clock pan.

Further frames were taken from inside the LM after the end of EVA-1. More were taken after EVA-2, and the magazine was completed after the return to lunar orbit.


AS14-66-9317 (OF300) ( 66k or 860k )
View of the ALSEP site from Al's window. Out of focus in the foreground, we can see some of the etching on the window that he used to see where the computer thought they were going to land.
AS14-66-9318 (OF300) ( 62k or 839k )
Similar to 9317.
AS14-66-9319 (OF300) ( 61k or 818k )
Similar to 9317.
AS14-66-9320 (OF300) ( 71k or 863k )
Leftward from 9319, down-Sun over the LM shadow.
AS14-66-9321 (OF300) ( 63k or 812k )
Similar to 9320.
AS14-66-9322 (OF300) ( 129k or 1048k )
Good picture over Al's thrusters toward the SWC, with well-defined footprints.
AS14-66-9323 (OF300) ( 118k or 957k )
Photo out Ed's window, showing the TV camera and the S-Band antenna.
AS14-66-9324 (OF300) ( 181k or 1102k )
119:42:01 Leftward from 9323. This frame was taken out Ed's window between the two EVAs at about 20:45 GMT/UTC on 5 February 1971, and shows the flag and the MET at the LM between the EVAs. Note that, in addition to parking the MET in the shadow of the S-Band antenna, as per checklist they have put the S-Band cover on it. Good footprint and tire track definition. The flag is face-on to the TV camera, pointing on an azimuth of about 120. The Sun's elevation was about 16.4 degrees. See a discussion following 131:09:18.
AS14-66-9325 (OF300) ( 190k or 1129k )
Similar to 9324.
AS14-66-9326 (OF300) ( 272k or 1600k )
S-Band antenna and the TV.

Post-EVA-2 images.


AS14-66-9327 (OF300) ( 67k or 1100k )
This photo of the Earth was taken through the rendezvous window over Al's station. It may have been taken after EVA-2. A reason for suspecting this is that Al took some pictures of Earth from the bottom of the ladder at 135:03:42 and may have decided to try some similar shots thru the rendezvous window.
AS14-66-9328 (OF300) ( 71k or 1145k )
Earth.
AS14-66-9329 (OF300) ( 53k or 653k )
Earth.
AS14-66-9330 (OF300) ( 79k or 965k )
Earth.
AS14-66-9331 (OF300) ( 28k or 404k )
Earth.
AS14-66-9332 (OF300) ( 40k or 616k )
Earth.
AS14-66-9333 (OF300) ( 61k or 814k )
Shows the ALSEP site out Al's window. Journal Contributor Lennie Waugh notes that the LM shadow is much shorter than the one in 9317, which was taken after EVA-1, indicating that this picture was taken after EVA-2.
AS14-66-9334 (OF300) ( 63k or 864k )
Similar to 9333.
AS14-66-9335 (OF300) ( 64k or 893k )
This frame was probably taken out Ed's window, a conclusion based on the relative azimuths of some small foreground rocks and the ALSEP instruments.
AS14-66-9336 (OF300) ( 68k or 891k )
Similar to 9335.
AS14-66-9337 (OF300) ( 104k or 1056k )
Post-EVA-2 photo out Ed's window showing the 'javelin' and one of the golf balls in a crater northwest of the LM. The javelin is lined up with Turtle Rock in the distance and with the golf ball, which is slightly closer to us than the 'javelin'. A detail ( 275k ) shows the crater containing the javelin and golf ball. Lennie Waugh has produced a labeled version detailing Ed's Station H activities.

Journal Contributor Mark Rosen calls attention to two fuzzy orange spots at the horizon to the left of center. The color of the spots and the fact that they are a close pair suggests that they are reflection of a light inside the cabin off the two panes of Ed's window. The LM windows are angled at about 45 degrees to the X-Z plane, with the inner part of the window forward and the outer part aft. A camera aimed forward, parallel to the fore/aft Z axis, will see the objects on the far side of the cabin at about the same fore-aft location. The windows are also tilted with the top forward and the bottom aft, which means that a camera looking fowrward will see objects lower in the cabin. In Apollo 17 image AS17-145-22224, taken after EVA-3, one of the lights at the lower right may be what is seen reflected in AS14-66-9337.As shown in a comparison, the two orange spots also appear at about the same location in 9342. The two pictures were clearly taken from about the same place with similar pointing. The appearance of the two spots at about the same place

AS14-66-9338 (OF300) ( 115k or 759k )
Ed Mitchell took this splendid picture after he and Al Shepard jettisoned the PLSSs in preparation for launch. Of particular interest are the tracks made by the crew and the MET during the traverse to the ALSEP deployment site and during the return to the LM. Apollo 17 astronaut Jack Schmitt speculates that the descent plume sweeps away the fine particles of soil, leaving a surface dominated by small rock fragments that reflect sunlight from the down-Sun direction and make the surface look lighter in color than normal. In places where the surface is disturbed, the normal reflectivity of the surface is restored. Whatever the detailed explanation for this phenomenon, it is related to the fact that, from orbit, the area immediately surrounding a LM looks noticeably lighter in color. The ALSEP Central Station is about 180m from the LM. Note the excursions the crew made around the rimless crater in the foreground and the large depression in the middle distance that they traversed in both directions. Without the visual clues provided by the tracks, the depression is not easy to pick out in this down-Sun photo. Note that the flag is now pointing on an azimuth of about 335 and undoubtedly moved from it prior pointing of about 120 as a result of the cabin depressurization done for the jettison. See a discussion following 131:09:18.

Journal Contributor Yuri Krasilnikov has created a comparison between 9338, a 16-mm frame taken before the pre-launch RCS hot-fire check and a frame following the hot-fire check. Although the orientation of the first two images are different because of camera mounting, the flag orientation relative to, say, the PLSS, is the same. The final frame shows the result of the large flag motion during the hot-fire check. Krasilnikov also calls attention a difference in the orientation of the access flap on the flap shown as it was before the hot-fire check, closeest to the LM in a detail from 9338.

Journal Contributor Jim Scotti notes that we "can see the impact 'crater' and roll marks made by the PLSS farthest from the LM. It rolled on it's side and you can see a fair bit of detail in the hoses and straps on the righthand side of it." Various PLSS imprints are indicated in a detail.

AS14-66-9339 (OF300) ( 121k or 742k )
Similar to 9338. Includes the javelin and the golf ball.
AS14-66-9340 (OF300) ( 171k or 981k )
Ed took this photograph out his LM window at some point after the completion of the second EVA. Note the dark-brown color of the soil disturbed by the crew as they walked. This phenomenon occurs only near the LM where the surface has been lightened by the Descent Engine plume. The MET is at the lower left and, just to the right of the MET, the Gold camera is lying on the surface. A portion of the S-Band antenna can be seen at the extreme right edge of the picture, just beyond one of the thrusters.

Ulli Lotzmann has created an enhanced detail showing the Gold camera and it's cover. Note what appear to be red latches on either side. These may be the red objects Al Bean mentioned during the 1991 review of the EVA-2 close-out at 135:06:48.

AS14-66-9341 (OF300) ( 125k or 867k )
Over Ed's thrusters toward the TV camera and the S-Band antenna.
AS14-66-9342 (OF300) ( 88k or 826k )
Javelin, golf ball, Turtle Rock with Ed's footprints leading back to the LM.
AS14-66-9343 (OF300) ( 91k or 853k )
Similar to 9342, but not quite as good.

The remaining frames were taken after the return to lunar orbit.


AS14-66-9344 (OF300) ( 43k or 716k )
Command-and Service Module 'Kitty Hawk' from the Lunar Module at rendezvous.
AS14-66-9345 (OF300) ( 47k or 803k )
View of the CSM from the LM during rendezvous.
AS14-66-9346 (OF300) ( 32k or 264k )
View of the CSM from the LM during rendezvous.
AS14-66-9347 (OF300) ( 46k or 736k )
View of the CSM from the LM during rendezvous.
AS14-66-9348 (OF300) ( 46k or 736k )
View of the CSM from the LM during rendezvous.
AS14-66-9349 (OF300) ( 45k or 718k )
View of the CSM from the LM during rendezvous.
AS14-66-9350 (OF300) ( 44k or 729k )
View of the CSM from the LM during rendezvous.
AS14-66-9351 (OF300) ( 40k or 692k )
View of the CSM from the LM during rendezvous.
AS14-66-9352 (OF300) ( 42k or 700k )
View of the CSM from the LM during rendezvous.
AS14-66-9353 (OF300) ( 40k or 684k )
View of the CSM from the LM during rendezvous.
AS14-66-9354 (OF300) ( 40k or 666k )
View of the CSM from the LM during rendezvous.
AS14-66-9355 (OF300) ( 51k or 705k )
View of the CSM from the LM during rendezvous.
AS14-66-9356 (OF300) ( 51k or 739k )
View of the CSM from the LM during rendezvous.
AS14-66-9357 (OF300) ( 59k or 715k )
View of the CSM from the LM during rendezvous.
AS14-66-9358 (OF300) ( 58k or 700k )
View of the CSM from the LM during rendezvous.
AS14-66-9359 (OF300) ( 62k or 686k )
View of the CSM from the LM during rendezvous.
AS14-66-9360 (OF300) ( 64k or 710k )
View of the CSM from the LM during rendezvous.

Magazine 67/JJ (Color) Frames 9361-9393

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

This magazine was used by both Ed Mitchell and Al Shepard during EVA-1, primarily during the ALSEP deployment.


AS14-67-9361 (OF300) ( 189k or 1132k )
117:12:00 Al starts a series of photographs documenting the ALSEP deployment with this photo of the mortar package in the foreground, the Central Station beyond it with cables leading to the various experiment packages, the Thumper/Geophone cable anchor, with the cable headed south (up and to the right) from the anchor past the MET. Note that the MET is parked with the handle pointed toward the east. The 16-mm movie camera - also called the Data Acquisition Camera (DAC) or, alternatively, the Sequence Camera - is the black box mounted on the top of the MET.
AS14-67-9362 (OF300) ( 165k or 1027k )
This photo is a close-up of the top of the Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE) and shows the gnomon/handle - resembling a cricket wicket - and the level bubble housing. A thermal skirt surrounds the seismometer.
AS14-67-9363 (OF300) ( 199k or 1100k )
Shows the view across the PSE toward the north face of the Central Station.
AS14-67-9364 (OF300) ( 170k or 1030k )
117:15:10 Close-up shot looking down on the top of the Charged Particle Lunar Environment Experiment (CPLEE). Note the east-pointing arrow with a bubble gauge next to it, and the ribbon cable coming off the top and leading to the Central Station.
AS14-67-9365 (OF300) ( 208k or 1098k )
117:16:43 Cross-Sun "locator" showing the location of the Charged Particle Lunar Environment Experiment (CPLEE), which is in the foreground, relative to the Central Station. The thermal skirt of the Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE) is at the right edge of the picture, and the MET is in the upper left corner.
AS14-67-9366 (OF300) ( 150k or 978k )
117:17:41 Down-Sun picture of the RTG with the Central Station in the background. The fins on the RTG provide radiative cooling. Note the relatively large amount of dust that has been kicked on to the RTG. The smaller object in the background is the LRRR. The mortar pack is at the right edge.
AS14-67-9367 (OF300) ( 146k or 1039k )
117:19:37 This up-Sun photo was taken from near the ALSEP Central Station back toward the LM in order to provide relative location information. As with the astronauts' bootprints, the track made by the MET tires are compact, smooth, and, as can be seen so dramatically in this picture, more highly reflective than the rough undisturbed surface.
AS14-67-9368 (OF300) ( 137k or 995k )
Similar to 9367.
AS14-67-9369 (OF300) ( 221k or 1204k )
117:20:27 This photo shows the Cold Cathode Ion Gauge (CCIG) and the Suprathermal Ion Detection Experiment (SIDE). The SIDE is the large box while the CCIG is the smaller instrument next to it. There is a great deal of dirt on the north face of the SIDE. Because this face receives little direct sunlight, the dirt will have little effect on the internal temperature of the instrument. Dirt on the east or west faces and on the top would increase the amount of sunlight that the instrument would absorb during the course of a lunar day and, therefore, would lead to a higher than optimal internal temperature.
AS14-67-9370 (OF300) ( 169k or 920k )
117:20:27 Similar to 9369. Note that Ed managed to get the CCIG to sit on the surface in the desired orientation, despite the set in the cable connecting it to the SIDE. On Apollo 12, the stiffness of this cable flipped the CCIG on its side and kept Pete Conrad and Al Bean from deploying it in the desired orientation.
AS14-67-9371 (OF300) ( 167k or 897k )
117:21:31 Close-up of the Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment (SIDE). This is one of the few ALSEP documentation photos taken during all of Apollo that shows a level bubble with any clarity. It is a large bubble, being about half the diameter of the dome that contains it. Note that there is some dirt on the top of the SIDE, although not covering a large percentage of the surface.
AS14-67-9372 (OF300) ( 199k or 1166k )
117:21:37 Al took this "locator" photo of the SIDE/CCIG toward the Central Station, which is northwest of the instruments. The Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment (SIDE) is at bottom center and the Cold Cathode Ion Gauge (CCIG) is at bottom right. Nearer the Central Station, from left to right are the MET, the geophone anchor (the stack tilted to the right), the Central Station, the mortar package, the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG), the Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE), and the Charged-Particle Lunar Environment Experiment (CPLEE). Note the inbound MET track coming into the picture at the right.
AS14-67-9373 (OF300) ( 284k or 1561k )
117:21:37 View of the SIDE/CCIG from the south. This photograph shows that there has been a substantial design change in the SIDE configuration since Apollo 12.

On that flight, the cable connecting the two instruments was stiff enough that, when the astronauts tried to manipulate the CCIG into its proper orientation, they tipped the SIDE over. Their SIDE sat on four short, splayed legs (see AS12-47-6922) and, for Apollo 14, the support design included longer legs attached near the top of the north and south faces to give more lateral stability. As Ed indicates to Houston at 116:39:59, the new design didn't work much better than the old one. Yet another design was devised for Apollo 15 - with three legs, two short ones at the bottom along one of the long sides and a long leg attached near the top of the opposite face with the SIDE leaning against that long leg. That design worked quite well.

AS14-67-9374 (OF300) ( 216k or 1485k )
117:24:33 Al took this shot from near the MET, looking southeast along the geophone line toward Ed, who is working his way back, stopping every 15 feet to operate the thumper. Ken Glover calls attention to the numerous imprints made by the geophone cable while Ed was deploying it. A detail is superimposed on a portion of Al's 8 o'clock pan shows 9374 the pointing direction relative to prominent features on the southern horizon.
AS14-67-9375 (OF300) ( 223k or 1420k )
117:24:33 View toward the north of the RTG and the CPLEE. The Central Station is at the left edge of the picture.
AS14-67-9376 (OF300) ( 190k or 1233k )
117:24:33 Geophone/thumper anchor flag, mortar pack, Central Station, CPLEE, and assorted packing material.
AS14-67-9377 (OF300) ( 207k or 1389k )
The geophone cable runs from the center of the image to the lower right corner. The geophone anchor is to the left of the Central Station.
AS14-67-9378 (OF300) ( 168k or 934k )
117:24:55 Close up of the Central Station, with the mortar pack to the right.
AS14-67-9379 (OF300) ( 169k or 924k )
117:25:32 View to the southwest showing the back of the Central Station and its top surface, with good definition of the astronaut switches at the bottom.
AS14-67-9380 (OF300) ( 208k or 1165k )
This photo shows the north face of the ALSEP Central Station. Mounting hardware for the various experiment packages are on the top surface and the various electrical connection are at the back, along the bottom edge.
AS14-67-9381 (OF300) ( 199k or 1151k )
Close-up of the north face of the Central Station.
AS14-67-9382 (OF300) ( 87k or 637k )
117:27:53 Up-Sun of the Central Station, spoiled by glare.
AS14-67-9383 (OF300) ( 192k or 1114k )
117:28:47 View of the south face of the Central Station with assorted packing material on the ground.
AS14-67-9384 (OF300) ( 190k or 1236k )
117:25:32 View to the northeast of the Central Station and, at the left, the Passive Seismometer experiment. The blue streak at the upper left is undoubtedly a film defect. The Cone ridge is in the distance.
AS14-67-9385 (OF300) ( 152k or 917k )
Close-up of the LRRR. As of February 2005, the retroreflectors were still being used in conjunction with a dedicated facility at the MacDondald Observatory in Texas.
AS14-67-9386 (OF300) ( 207k or 1276k )
Close-up of the LRRR.
AS14-67-9387 (OF300) ( 0.1 Mb or 0.6 Mb )
117:31:47 Up-Sun of the LRRR, showing Ed at the MET and the LM in the background, just to the right of Ed. Journal Contributor Rob Sabel has created an enhanced version (0.7 Mb)
AS14-67-9388 (OF300) ( 178k or 1090k )
117:42:26 Al's up-Sun "locator" to the LM across the circle he has drawn to define his sampling area. There are a few walnut-sized rocks sticking out the regolith. Note the outbound MET tracks on the right.
AS14-67-9389 (OF300) ( 81k or 726k )
117:42:37 Al's down-Sun "locator" to the ALSEP site for the comprehensive sample collected on the way back to the LM after the ALSEP deployment. Ed is coming to join Al and is carrying the extension handle. The SIDE/CCIG are to the left of him. In the right foreground, note the smooth print left by the MET and the deep toe-impression made by Al's boot.
AS14-67-9390 (OF300) ( 265k or 1319k )
117:50:12 Cross-Sun to the south of Al's football-sized rocks. The larger of the two rocks that Al collected at this site is probably the one in the middle of the image. Apparently, Al did not take any photos after picking up the rocks, photos which would have helped with the identification of the rocks in these pre-sampling pictures. Note the MET handle and front support legs.
AS14-67-9391 (OF300) ( 255k or 1269k )
Al has stepped to his left to get a stereo companion to 9390.
AS14-67-9392 (OF300) ( 305k or 1519k )
This picture is taken to the north of the same area shown in 9390 and 9391.
AS14-67-9393 (OF300) ( 324k or 1683k )
Similar to 9392.

Magazine 68/MM (Color) Frames 9393a-9492

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

This magazine was used by Ed Mitchell during EVA-2


AS14-68-9393a (OF300) ( 90k or 841k )
131:59:28 "Locator" for the Lunar Portable Magnetometer [LPM] taken by Ed Mitchell from near the Station A pan location. This frame is listed in National Space Science and Data Center document NSSDC 71-16b, "Part II, Apollo 14 Photography; 70-mm, 35-mm, 16-mm, and 5-in. Frame Index; August 1971", as an unnumbered half frame. It is incorrectly described as showing the TV camera near the LM. A laterally-cropped - and properly described - version was used as Figure 13-3b [ 530k ] in the Apollo 14 Preliminary Science Report. Early in 2006, after I first became aware that this image existed, Stephen Tellier, LPI provided a scan [983k ] from a duplicate film roll and wrote, "This proved to be a tough scan but I think I finally got something you can use. The file is a bit large because I included a portion of first numbered image [9394] and the film leader immediately in front of the frame in question so you can decide where the top and bottom of the image are (or should be) and how you want to crop it."
AS14-68-9394 (OF300) ( 95k or 892k )
132:16:29 Down-Sun. Ed has started a pan at Station A.
AS14-68-9395 (OF300) ( 94k or 887k )
Down-Sun.
AS14-68-9396 (OF300) ( 92k or 921k )
Rightward of 9395, showing a large boulder.
AS14-68-9397 (OF300) ( 92k or 817k )
Rightward of 9396. Note the flat-topped rock on the right edge.
AS14-68-9398 (OF300) ( 116k or 953k )
132:16:29 This frame from Ed's Station A pan gives an impression of the undulation of the local terrain.
AS14-68-9399 (OF300) ( 113k or 975k )
Rightward of 9398, showing the undulation of the local terrain.
AS14-68-9400 (OF300) ( 145k or 1249k )
Rightward of 9399. Note the small crater inside the larger one on the right side.
AS14-68-9401 (OF300) ( 232k or 1948k )
Rightward of 9400, with the two craters noted previously at the left. This photo gives a good view of the Cone Crater ridge.
AS14-68-9402 (OF300) ( 170k or 1670k )
Rightward of 9401. Up-Sun showing the ridge line under the Sun glare. There are only a few rock fragments in the immediate area of Station A.
AS14-68-9403 (OF300) ( 196k or 1760k )
Rightward of 9402. Note the high reflectivity of the up-Sun footprints.
AS14-68-9404 (OF300) ( 178k or 1476k )
132:16:44 Good picture of Al, who is carrying the core tube back to the MET. He has the upper end of the core tube in his left hand and the bit end resting on the hammer, which is in his right hand. Old Old Nameless is in the distance beyond Al. On the MET, we can see the 16-mm sequence camera, the trenching tool, weighbags hanging down on either side, and the Gold camera mounted on the front. The blade on the trenching tool is much broader than the ones flown on later missions.
AS14-68-9405 (OF300) ( 139k or 991k )
132:16:44 Superb picture of Al with the core tube and extension handle. Part of Ed's Station A pan. Note that Al is holding the hammer in his right hand. He has a pair of tongs tethered to his waist at the left side, with the handle on the outside of his left hip.
AS14-68-9406 (OF300) ( 139k or 992k )
132:16:44 Rightward of 9405, showing the MET tracks inbound to Station A. Al was pulling the MET at that point in the traverse and we can see that, as a result of the loping stride that he favored, his toe prints are more deeply impressed into the surface than his heel prints and that his left and right bootprints are similar.
AS14-68-9407 (OF300) ( 128k or 972k )
132:16:44 Rightward of 9406, showing the MET tracks, Al's footprints and, alongside those to our right, Ed's footprints. Ed tends to use a skip and we can see in his footprints that his right foot lands flat and then makes only a slight toe impression as he pushes off. His left footprints show a smaller, much deeper, toe-only landing. Note that Al's left and right footprints are similar, although there are places where his right footprints seem deeper, but this may be a result of variations in bearing strength of the surface.
Mini-pan 9407/8 ( 1.8 Mb )
I combined portions of the two images to show the MET tracks and bootprint trails coming out from the LM. I shrank 9408 by about 10 percent to match the apparent vertical distance between the horizon and the MET tracks at the point where I joined the two images.
AS14-68-9408 (OF300) ( 108k or 952k )
132:16:44 Final frame in Ed's Station A pan, showing the LM. This picture gives a good impression of the circuitous path they've followed in order to go around craters and contains further examples of the differing bootprint patterns made by Al, on the left, pulling the MET and using a loping stride, and Ed, who was on the right, using a skipping stride.
AS14-68-9409 (OF300) ( 166k or 1230k )
132:21:23 Ed is collecting a documented sample at Station A and takes this down-Sun locator to the LM. It shows the MET at the upper left and, in the foreground, the gnomon with a color/gray scale chart used to calibrate the photoprocessing. The prominent rock on the righthand side can be seen on the right hand side of the unnumbered LPM "locator". The rock near the northwest leg of the gnomon is the sample.
AS14-68-9410 (OF300) ( 224k or 1541k )
Ed has moved around to the southeast of the gnomon.
AS14-68-9411 (OF300) ( 220k or 1586k )
Ed has stepped to his right to take a stereo companion to 9410.
AS14-68-9412 (OF300) ( 171k or 1327k )
Post-sample photo companion to 9411. A comparison of the two photos leaves no doubt as to which rock it was that Ed sampled.
AS14-68-9413 (OF300) ( 85k or 840k )
Post-sample over the gnomon toward the LM. Ed either forgot to change the focus setting or he moved while he was taking the picture.
AS14-68-9414 (OF300) ( 218k or 1406k )
132:56:45 Close-up of the boulder at Station B2. In the Apollo 14 Preliminary Science Report, this boulder is referred to as Big Rock. The upper surface is unusually flat and may represent a fracture surface. The rock is 0.6 meters high and about 1.5 meters long. We can see Al's camera with CDR (Commander) written on the side, the tongs under his hoses. Note the dirt on his boots and knees. The picture is taken toward the north. They have come up a small rise and, out in the distance beyond the boulder, we can see a large crater.

Ulli Lotzmann calls attention to a detail, which shows that the strap on Al's right boot has come undone. During the technical debrief, he was asked about this picture and replied "I didn't notice it until I saw the picture myself.", to which Ed added "I noticed it something during the EVA....I guess I didn't mention it and he didn't have any trouble with it." Readers should note that the EVA boot is an overshoe and is not an integral part of the pressure suit.

AS14-68-9415 (OF300) ( 86k or 845k )
132:57:52 Down-Sun from Ed's Station B2 pan. The LM is slightly above and to the left of center. This photo shows that they have come quite a ways uphill. Figure 3.1 ( 232k 1330k or ) in the Apollo 14 Mission Report indicates that Station B2 is about 30 meters above the spacecraft.
AS14-68-9416 (OF300) ( 83k or 883k )
Rightward of 9415, showing Ed's shadow and that of Big Rock.
AS14-68-9417 (OF300) ( 110k or 867k )
Rightward of 9416, across the top of Big Rock.
AS14-68-9418 (OF300) ( 165k or 1062k )
Rightward of 9417, showing a portion of Big Rock in the lower left. The local surface is heavily pockmarked with small craters and there are a number of sizable boulders in the area.
AS14-68-9419 (OF300) ( 170k or 1101k )
Rightward of 9418, showing the view toward the NNE with a large boulder at right center.
AS14-68-9420 (OF300) ( 249k or 1837k )
Rightward of 9419, the large boulder noted in 9419 is at left center. The apparent summit of the Cone Crater rim is beyond the boulder.
AS14-68-9421 (OF300) ( 208k or 1862k )
132:57:52 Frame from Ed Mitchell's Station B2 pan showing the view toward the top of Cone Ridge.
AS14-68-9422 (OF300) ( 163k or 1624k )
132:57:52 Frame from Ed Mitchell's Station B2 pan showing the up-Sun view. Al has already grabbed the MET and has resumed the climb.
AS14-68-9423 (OF300) ( 188k or 1710k )
132:57:52 Frame from Ed Mitchell's Station B2 pan giving an up-Sun view of the MET tracks and Al's footprints.
AS14-68-9424 (OF300) ( 206k or 1685k )
Rightward of 9423, with Old Nameless on the right, above center.
AS14-68-9425 (OF300) ( 193k or 1181k )
Rightward of 9424, with Old Nameless above center.
AS14-68-9426 (OF300) ( 167k or 1084k )
Rightward of 9425.
AS14-68-9427 (OF300) ( 154k or 1095k )
Rightward of 9426.
AS14-68-9428 (OF300) ( 102k or 877k )
Rightward of 9427, footprints.
AS14-68-9429 (OF300) ( 80k or 837k )
132:57:52 Rightward of 9428, with the LM at right center.
AS14-68-9430 (OF300) ( 76k or 775k )
133:14:30 Ed takes a pan at Station B3, starting with this down-Sun. The LM is over the right edge of the boulder at the left side of the picture.
AS14-68-9431 (OF300) ( 107k or 901k )
Rightward of 9430.
AS14-68-9432 (OF300) ( 131k or 924k )
Rightward of 9431, centered on a large boulder. To the right of the boulder, there appears to be a soil mound similar to the ones sampled by the Apollo 12 crew near their ALSEP site.
AS14-68-9433 (OF300) ( 160k or 960k )
Rightward of 9432, with a rubble covered boulder at the center.
AS14-68-9434 (OF300) ( 160k or 1021k )
Rightward of 9433, showing a considerable number of boulders in the direction of the apparent Cone summit.
AS14-68-9435 (OF300) ( 180k or 1353k )
Rightward of 9434.
AS14-68-9436 (OF300) ( 105k or 1210k )
Rightward of 9435, up-Sun showing very large numbers of rocks and boulders on the apparent horizon.
AS14-68-9437 (OF300) ( 120k or 1235k )
Rightward of 9436, up-Sun.
AS14-68-9438 (OF300) ( 135k or 1277k )
Rightward of 9437, showing Al's left arm and left leg.
AS14-68-9439 (OF300) ( 160k or 1366k )
Rightward of 9438, Al has moved across Ed's field-of-view. We can see the aft end of the MET with the rubber tires, weighbags and the "Dixie Cup" sample bags.
AS14-68-9440 (OF300) ( 136k or 959k )
Rightward of 9439, centered on Old Nameless.
AS14-68-9441 (OF300) ( 104k or 834k )
Rightward of 9440, centered on the cratered ridge to the right of Old Nameless. A comparison of the relative positions of this and other features provide a means of calculating just where the astronauts have stopped during the traverse. In the document Geology of the Apollo 14 Landing Site in the Fra Mauro Highlands, U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 880, by Gordon Swann and others, Figure 5, which is Lunar Orbiter IV frame 120H3, shows the Fra Mauro/Parry area with the landing site marked 30 kilometers NNE of crater Fra Mauro D. Figure 4 is AS12-52-7597, a photo taken from the Apollo 12 Command Module, with Old Nameless marked on it. And figure 7, which is Lunar Orbiter III frame 133M has Cone Crater, Old Nameless and the landing spot marked. On the scale of these photographs, the hills and ridges near Old Nameless and the feature to the west are not prominent.
AS14-68-9442 (OF300) ( 97k or 957k )
133:14:34 Rightward of 9441. Final frame from Ed's Station B3 pan, showing the view along the MET tracks. The LM is at the right-hand side. The fact that the MET tracks are coming up from the left indicates how much wandering they have been doing. They are currently angling toward the north although, as we know, not enough.
AS14-68-9443 (OF300) ( 236k or 1405k )
133:25:38 Cross-Sun stereo "before" from the south of the gnomon at Station C-Prime. Once he finishes with the "before" photos, Ed will collect the small rock which is just north of the up-Sun gnomon leg.
AS14-68-9444 (OF300) ( 241k or 1426k )
Ed steps to his right to take this stereo companion to 9443. As we now know, the rim of Cone Crater is beyond the boulders on the near horizon.
AS14-68-9445 (OF300) ( 184k or 1418k )
133:25:38 Down-Sun of the first sampling location at Station C-Prime. The white boulder at Station C1, known as Saddle Rock, is on the local horizon, above and to the right of the split boulder beyond the gnomon.
AS14-68-9446 (OF300) ( 245k or 1493k )
133:28:24 Post-sampling shot of Ed's documented sample at Station C-Prime.
AS14-68-9447 (OF300) ( 116k or 1009k )
Ed has stepped around to the northeast to take another "after" of his documented sample area. Note the long-linear rock which is north of the gnomon in both the "befores" and "afters".
AS14-68-9448 (OF300) ( 148k or 1160k )
133:40:48 Close-up of a white boulder at Station C1. The LM is just above the righthand corner of the boulder, as indicated in a detail. The large white boulder that was visible from Station C-Prime is out of the field-of-view to the right. Note the well-defined contact between the white rock on the bottom and a more normal gray rock on the top. Note, also, that we are looking at two boulders, with only the top and right edge of the background boulder visible beyond the foreground boulder. The background boulder also appears to have a contact between white and gray materials, with the lower right toe of the background boulder being white. In the Apollo 14 Preliminary Science Report, the foreground boulder is referred to as Contact Rock.
AS14-68-9449 (OF300) ( 119k or 998k )
Ed has turned to his right to photograph the cluster of large blocks that were visible from Station C-Prime. Note the contact in the large, upright boulder on the left. The boulder to its right is composed mostly of the white material.
AS14-68-9450 (OF300) ( 135k or 1102k )
Ed has turned further to his right to take this portrait of the boulder known as Saddle Rock. Note the extensive skirt (fillet) of dirt that has built up at the base of the rock. There is even dirt that has been thrown up onto the sides of Saddle Rock, presumably from an impact somewhere in the area. Keith Cowing of the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project has put Saddle Rock in the context ( 2.2Mb ) of restored Lunar Orbiter frame 133-H2.
AS14-68-9451 (OF300) ( 144k or 1085k )
Ed has stepped back and to his right to take another picture of Saddle Rock.
AS14-68-9452 (OF300) ( 210k or 1434k )
133:40:48 Down-Sun of the southern face of Saddle Rock. Notice that he has put his hammer and one of the "Dixie-Cup" sample bags on the smaller white boulder in the foreground. In the Apollo 14 Preliminary Science Report, this boulder is referred to as White Rock. The tall boulder above and beyond the hammer is the same one shown in 9449.
AS14-68-9453 (OF300) ( 157k or 1311k )
133:42:31 Ed has chipped a sample off White Rock and then took this "after". The chip was taken off the rock just below and to the right of the end of the shadow of the hammer handle.
AS14-68-9454 (OF300) ( 223k or 1432k )
134:17:16 Ed has pushed a triple core by hand partway into the ground at Station G. The bottom section is about halfway in. Note that Ed has the extension handle attached to the top of the core-tube stack. Note, also, the MET tracks and the circle of footprints that Ed made around the core. Ed will have to abandon this attempt to get a triple core when he runs into a buried rock.
AS14-68-9455 (OF300) ( 268k or 1730k )
134:26:27 While Ed worked on the triple core, Al was digging a trench and, in the end, needed the extension handle to get it to full depth. In this photo, we can see that the extension handle has been removed prior to Ed's second attempt at getting the triple. Because of the length of the triple core, Ed can hammer the first section or two into the ground without the extension handle. He will need it, however, to finish the job and, in fact, gets it back from Al at about 134:27:48.
AS14-68-9456 (OF300) ( 139k or 998k )
134:27:00 Ed raised the camera to show the horizon in a "locator".
AS14-68-9457 (OF300) ( 156k or 1213k )
134:31:46 Note that Ed has the extension handle to complete the core. This photo is blurred.
AS14-68-9458 (OF300) ( 206k or 1343k )
Similar to 9457.
AS14-68-9459 (OF300) ( 155k or 1270k )
134:42:21 Down-Sun of the Station G documented sample.
AS14-68-9460 (OF300) ( 236k or 1546k )
Cross-Sun from the north of the documented sample site at Station G.
AS14-68-9461 (OF300) ( 273k or 1738k )
Ed has stepped left to take this stereo companion to 9460. He will collect the long-rectangular rock.
AS14-68-9462 (OF300) ( 243k or 1589k )
Post-sample photo of the Station G documented sample.
AS14-68-9463 (OF300) ( 242k or 1556k )
Ed has stepped left to take this stereo companion to 9462.
AS14-68-9464 (OF300) ( 151k or 1128k )
Ed has probably raised the camera to get a horizon "locator" at the Station G documented sample site.
AS14-68-9465 (OF300) ( 267k or 1725k )
134:49:38 Cross-sun "before" from the south of the documented sample site at Station G2. This is one of the few instances of the Apollo 14 crew doing documented sampling as a team. While Ed takes the cross-Sun's, Al is taking a down-Sun "locator" to the LM.
AS14-68-9466 (OF300) ( 245k or 1608k )
Ed has stepped to the right to take this stereo companion to 9465. The sample is northwest of the northern gnomon leg.
AS14-68-9467 (OF300) ( 248k or 1595k )
134:51:17 Post-sample photo of the Station G2 documented sample site.
AS14-68-9468 (OF300) ( 246k or 1625k )
134:56:35 Ed is taking a series of photographs in the boulder field at Station H, north of the LM. This first photo is a close-up of some small boulders.
AS14-68-9469 (OF300) ( 236k or 1582k )
134:56:35 Cross-Sun to the north of a group of Station H boulders. Turtle Rock is at the upper left.
AS14-68-9470 (OF300) ( 279k or 1759k )
Rightward from 9469.
AS14-68-9471 (OF300) ( 152k or 1071k )
Turtle Rock is the large boulder at left center.
AS14-68-9472 (OF300) ( 144k or 1146k )
134:56:35 Ed has moved over close to Turtle Rock to take a series of photos of this largest boulder in the group.
AS14-68-9473 (OF300) ( 152k or 1238k )
Ed has stepped to his right to continue his portrait of Turtle Rock.
AS14-68-9473/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 14Mb or 348k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Kevin Frank.
AS14-68-9474 (OF300) ( 199k or 1416k )
Ed has changed his focus setting.
AS14-68-9475 (OF300) ( 173k or 1336k )
Ed has stepped to his left to repeat 9472 at a more appropriate focus setting. This is an excellent picture of Turtle Rock.
AS14-68-9476 (OF300) ( 146k or 1122k )
134:56:35 Ed has stepped to his left again to complete his portrait of Turtle Rock. This is probably the best picture of the series. The boulder gets its name from the turtle-like pieces of rock sitting on the top of the main boulder. Ed was so busy at this point that he never noticed the turtle. Note the large white inclusion in the right-hand third of the boulder about half way up from the bottom. Note, also, the skirt of soil - called a fillet - built up out of ejecta from nearby impacts splashing against the sides of the rock.
AS14-68-9477 (OF300) ( 78k or 861k )
135:01:30 Ed has started a pan at Station H, beginning with this down-Sun toward the ALSEP.
AS14-68-9478 (OF300) ( 99k or 1014k )
Rightward of 9477, showing the turtle.
AS14-68-9479 (OF300) ( 116k or 1008k )
135:01:30 Rightward of 9478. Frame from Ed's Station H pan centered on Turtle Rock.
AS14-68-9480 (OF300) ( 136k or 1017k )
Rightward of 9479, showing a number of large boulders on the local horizon.
AS14-68-9481 (OF300) ( 153k or 1009k )
Rightward of 9480.
AS14-68-9482 (OF300) ( 149k or 1278k )
Rightward of 9481.
AS14-68-9483 (OF300) ( 134k or 1328k )
Rightward of 9482, showing some boulders on the slope of the Cone Crater ridge.
AS14-68-9484 (OF300) ( 119k or 1323k )
Rightward of 9483, up-Sun.
AS14-68-9485 (OF300) ( 103k or 1227k )
Rightward of 9484.
AS14-68-9486 (OF300) ( 154k or 1365k )
135:01:56 Photo toward the LM from Station H. We are looking ESE. Al is to the left of the spacecraft with his back to us looking in the general direction of the LM and, beyond it, Old Nameless. As per request from Houston, he is aiming the TV camera at the MESA. The MET tracks made when they started the traverse up to Cone can be seen beyond Al and the tracks Ed made on his way to Station H are in the foreground. Compare with Lennie Waugh's labeled version of AS14-66-9337, which Ed took out his window after the EVA, showing, also, the tracks he made on the way back to the LM.
AS14-68-9486/7 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 9Mb or 290k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Kevin Frank.
AS14-68-9487 (OF300) ( 168k or 1000k )
135:01:56 Frame from Ed's Station H pan. Rightward of 9486 but very similar.
AS14-68-9488 (OF300) ( 148k or 756k )
Rightward of 9487, with the LM out of the field-of-view to the left. The Solar Wind Collector can be seen still in place.
AS14-68-9489 (OF300) ( 118k or 961k )
Rightward of 9488, given an impression of the undulations of the local terrain and of the bowl rim rising up and forming the local horizon to the southwest.
AS14-68-9490 (OF300) ( 90k or 876k )
Rightward of 9489.
AS14-68-9491 (OF300) ( 108k or 1220k )
135:03:11 Rightward of 9488, with the ALSEP at the right edge. This is the last frame in Ed's Station H pan.
AS14-68-9492 (OF300) ( 31k or 322k )
This picture shows the transmission element in the S-Band.

Magazine 69/P (B & W) Frames 9493-9656

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

This magazine was used for 500-mm photography of the proposed Descartes landing site on three Command Module passes and, subsequently, coverage of Lansberg B, D, and F. There were also to 'opportunity shots' of features in the general area of the Apollo 14 landing site.


AS14-69-9526 (0.25 Mb or 2.5 Mb)
A nearly vertical view of the Descartes site, with South Ray Crater at the right edge, Baby Ray next to it and North Ray near the left edge. House Rock is visible. Taken with a 500-mm lens from 60 miles altitude. Downloaded from the LPI Apollo Image Atlas.
AS14-69-9576 (0.28 Mb or 3.0 Mb)
Beautiful oblique view of the Fra Mauro highlands. Downloaded from the LPI Apollo Image Atlas. René Cantin has provided a labeled version ( 474k ).
AS14-69-9612 (0.25 Mb or 3.0 Mb)
Good shot of North Ray Crater below center. Baby Ray Crater is at the center right edge. House Rock is visible. (Apollo 16 landing site.) Downloaded from the LPI Apollo Image Atlas.

Magazine 70/Q (B & W) Frames 9657-9840

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

This magazine was used in lunar orbit.



Magazine 71/Q (B & W) Frames 9841-9917

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

This magazine was used during transearth coast.



Magazine 72/L (Color) Frames 9918-10039

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

This magazine was used in lunar orbit.


AS14-72-9920 ( 72k or 178k )
The S-IVB stage vents propellant during transposition and docking. Scan by Kipp Teague.
AS14-72-9975 ( 220k )
Portion of King Crater taken with a 500mm lens on Rev 14. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.

Magazine 73/M (Color) Frames 10040-10204

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

This magazine was used in lunar orbit and transearth coast for 250-mm photography.



Magazine 74/N (Color) Frames 10205-10222

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

This magazine was used by Stu Roosa in lunar orbit for LM separation and, later, for rendezvous, docking, and LM jettison.


AS14-74-10205 (OF300) ( 45k or 247k )
Lunar Module from the Command Module after undocking and separation.
AS14-74-10206 (OF300) ( 51k or 641k )
Lunar Module from the Command Module after undocking and separation.
AS14-74-10207 (OF300) ( 35k or 651k )
Lunar Module from the Command Module after undocking and separation.
AS14-74-10208 (OF300) ( 48k or 930k )
Lunar Module from the Command Module after undocking and separation.
AS14-74-10209 (OF300) ( 35k or 707k )
Lunar Module from the Command Module after undocking and separation.
AS14-74-10210 (OF300) ( 32k or 420k )
Lunar Module from the Command Module after undocking and separation.
AS14-74-10211 (OF300) ( 106k or 1573k )
View of the LM thru the CSM Crewman Optical Alignment Sight (COAS). Kipp create has created an enhanced detail showing the LM more clearly. Kipp writes, "I used a digital camera noise removal feature in Paint Shop Pro 9 to remove much of the noise, then curves-corrected the heavily de-saturated (color) in what was left." Paul Fjeld thinks that 10211 was taken through the left-hand rendezvous window - which he believes is framing the picture - with the camera held up close to the COAS.
AS14-74-10212 (OF300) ( 49k or 393k )
Lunar Module prior to being jettisoned.
AS14-74-10213 (OF300) ( 57k or 398k )
Lunar Module prior to being jettisoned.
AS14-74-10214 (OF300) ( 42k or 297k )
Lunar Module after being jettisoned.
AS14-74-10215 (OF300) ( 41k or 307k )
Lunar Module after being jettisoned.
AS14-74-10216 (OF300) ( 41k or 337k )
Lunar Module after being jettisoned.
AS14-74-10217 (OF300) ( 33k or 283k )
Lunar Module after being jettisoned.
AS14-74-10218 (OF300) ( 30k or 263k )
Lunar Module after being jettisoned.
AS14-74-10219 (OF300) ( 31k or 365k )
Lunar Module after being jettisoned.
AS14-74-10220 (OF300) ( 33k or 376k )
Lunar Module after being jettisoned.
AS14-74-10221 (OF300) ( 39k or 540k )
Lunar Module after being jettisoned.
AS14-74-10222 (OF300) ( 41k or 596k )
Lunar Module after being jettisoned.

Magazine 75/R (B & W) Frames 10223-10320

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

This magazine was used by Stu Roosa in lunar orbit for photography at zero phase and, later for photography of he quarter to half moon during departure from lunar orbit



Magazine 76/O (Color) Frames 10321-10356

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

This magazine was used for photos inside the Command Module and for high-altitude views of Earth.


AS14-76-10331 (OF300) ( 151k or 1325k )
Stu Roosa in the Command Module at some point prior to trans-lunar injection.

Magazine 77 (color) Frames 10357-10374

Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

Magazine 77 was used in the Apollo Lunar Surface Close-up (Gold) Camera. The area shown in each images is 72 mm by 83 mm.

Anaglyphs created by Erwin D'Hoore from scans found on the website of the Lunar and Planetary Institute.


AS14-77-10357 ( 1.7Mb )
MET wheel impression. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-77-10358 ( 1.9Mb )
MET wheel impression. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-77-10359 ( 1.8Mb )
Boot imprint. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-77-10360 ( 1.8Mb )
Boot imprint. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.


Frames 10361 to 10367 show the Thermal Degradation Sample (TDS).


AS14-77-10361 ( 1.6Mb )

TDS. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-77-10362 ( 1.5Mb )
TDS. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-77-10363 ( 1.9Mb )
TDS. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-77-10364 ( 1.6Mb )
TDS. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-77-10365 ( 1.6Mb )
TDS. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-77-10366 ( 1.9Mb )
TDS. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-77-10367 ( 1.9Mb )
TDS. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.


The remaining frames show further examples of lunar surface material


AS14-77-10368 ( 2.1Mb )

Boot imprint. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-77-10369 ( 1.9Mb )
Boot imprint. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-77-10370 ( 2.1Mb )
Undisturbed lunar soil. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-77-10371 ( 2.0Mb )
Undisturbed lunar soil. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-77-10372 ( 1.9Mb )
Undisturbed lunar soil. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS14-77-10373 ( 1.8Mb )
Partly lightstruck. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.

Magazine 78/S (B & W) Frames 10375-10399

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

This magazine was used for earthshine photography



Magazine 80/W (B & W) Frames 10436-10642

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

This magazine was used for stereo strip photography along the CSM ground track.



Recovery and Post-Flight

KSC-71P-152 (128k)

A Navy diver enters the water from the recovery helicopter after splashdown. 9 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-156 (136k)
A Navy diver (left) secures a flotation collar around the Command Module. 9 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S71-19474 (87k)
A navy diver helps Ed Mitchell into the recovery raft. 9 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-143 (87k)
Al Shepard (center) and Stu Roosa (right) in the recovery raft following splashdown. 9 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-148 (168k)
Al Shepard (foreground), Stu Roosa (center), and Ed Mitchell (farthest from the camera in the recovery raft watch a Navy diver close the Command Module hatch. 9 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-161 (127k)
The Apollo 14 crew watches a Navy diver close the Command Module hatch. 9 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-149 (177k)
A member of the Apollo 14 crew is winched up to the recovery helicopter. 9 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-149 (177k)
A member of the Apollo 14 crew is winched up to the recovery helicopter. Shepard is still on the raft at the right with his back to the camera. 9 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S71-19475 (199k)
Ed MItchell (left), Stu Roosa, and Al Shepard in the recovery raft with a Navy diver. 9 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-150 (127k)
A member of the Apollo 14 crew is winched up to the recovery helicopter. 9 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S71-19476 (261k)
The last member of the Apollo 14 crew, undoubtedly Shepard, is winched up to the recovery helicopter. 9 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-163 (100k)
Stu Roosa (left), Ed Mitchell (center), and Al Shepard (right) emerge from the recovery helicopter and wave to the waiting crew of USS New Orleans . 9 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S71-19473 (119k)
Stu Roosa (left), Ed Mitchell (center), and Al Shepard (right) emerge from the recovery helicopter and wave to the waiting crew of USS New Orleans . 9 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-71P-168 (100k)
Stu Roosa (left), Al Shepard (center), and Ed Mitchell (right) in the isolation van. 9 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S71-18557 (100k)
Stu Roosa (left), Al Shepard (center), and Ed Mitchell (right) in the isolation van. Roosa is using the microphone to talk to bystanders. 9 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
71-H-338 (109k)
Ed Mitchell and Al Shepard examine some of the samples during a post-mission debrief with geologists. 18 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
71-H-339 (109k)
Ed Mitchell holds a sample collection bag during a post-mission debrief with geologists. 18 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S71-22028 (121k)
Ed Mitchell addresses family and co-workers at the Manned Spaceflight Center in Houston. Al Shepard is on the left and Stu Roosa is in the center. 26 February 1971. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S71-29179 (1.3 Mb)
Sample 14321, aka Big Bertha, a 9.0 kg breccia that was collected at Station C1 near the rim of Cone Crater. "B" face, photographed in the Lunar Receiving Lab. Scan downloaded from Lunar Sample Atlas: Lunar Sample 14321. Orientation of the cube does not correspond to sample orientation on the Moon, but does indicate the relative orientation of the sample in the six views.
S71-29180 (0.8 Mb)
Sample 14321, aka Big Bertha, a 9.0 kg breccia that was collected at Station C1 near the rim of Cone Crater. "North" face, photographed in the Lunar Receiving Lab. Scan downloaded from Lunar Sample Atlas: Lunar Sample 14321. Orientation of the cube does not correspond to sample orientation on the Moon, but does indicate the relative orientation of the sample in the six views.
S71-29181 (1.2 Mb)
Sample 14321, aka Big Bertha, a 9.0 kg breccia that was collected at Station C1 near the rim of Cone Crater. "East" face, photographed in the Lunar Receiving Lab. Scan downloaded from Lunar Sample Atlas: Lunar Sample 14321. Orientation of the cube does not correspond to sample orientation on the Moon, but does indicate the relative orientation of the sample in the six views.
S71-29182 (0.8 Mb)
Sample 14321, aka Big Bertha, a 9.0 kg breccia that was collected at Station C1 near the rim of Cone Crater. "South" face, photographed in the Lunar Receiving Lab. Scan downloaded from Lunar Sample Atlas: Lunar Sample 14321. Orientation of the cube does not correspond to sample orientation on the Moon, but does indicate the relative orientation of the sample in the six views.
S71-29183 (0.7 Mb)
Sample 14321, aka Big Bertha, a 9.0 kg breccia that was collected at Station C1 near the rim of Cone Crater. "Top" face, photographed in the Lunar Receiving Lab. Scan downloaded from Lunar Sample Atlas: Lunar Sample 14321. Orientation of the cube does not correspond to sample orientation on the Moon, but does indicate the relative orientation of the sample in the six views.
S71-29184 (0.7 Mb)
Sample 14321, aka Big Bertha, a 9.0 kg breccia that was collected at Station C1 near the rim of Cone Crater. "West" face, photographed in the Lunar Receiving Lab. Scan downloaded from Lunar Sample Atlas: Lunar Sample 14321. Orientation of the cube does not correspond to sample orientation on the Moon, but does indicate the relative orientation of the sample in the six views.
S71-29203 (0.7 Mb)
Sample 14311, the largest portion of a 3.2 kg breccia that was collected as a grab sample near Flank Crater at the location marked Dg on the USGS traverse map. "West" face, photographed in the Lunar Receiving Lab. of Scan downloaded from Lunar Sample Atlas: Lunar Sample 14311. Orientation of the cube does not correspond to sample orientation on the Moon, but does indicate the relative orientation of the sample in the six views.
S71-29204 (0.9 Mb)
Sample 14311, the largest portion of a 3.2 kg breccia that was collected as a grab sample near Flank Crater at the location marked Dg on the USGS traverse map. "South" face, photographed in the Lunar Receiving Lab. of Scan downloaded from Lunar Sample Atlas: Lunar Sample 14311. Orientation of the cube does not correspond to sample orientation on the Moon, but does indicate the relative orientation of the sample in the six views.
S71-29205 (0.9 Mb)
Sample 14311, the largest portion of a 3.2 kg breccia that was collected as a grab sample near Flank Crater at the location marked Dg on the USGS traverse map. "Top" face, photographed in the Lunar Receiving Lab. of Scan downloaded from Lunar Sample Atlas: Lunar Sample 14311. Orientation of the cube does not correspond to sample orientation on the Moon, but does indicate the relative orientation of the sample in the six views.
S71-29206 (0.9 Mb)
Sample 14311, the largest portion of a 3.2 kg breccia that was collected as a grab sample near Flank Crater at the location marked Dg on the USGS traverse map. "Bottom" face, photographed in the Lunar Receiving Lab. of Scan downloaded from Lunar Sample Atlas: Lunar Sample 14311. Orientation of the cube does not correspond to sample orientation on the Moon, but does indicate the relative orientation of the sample in the six views.
S71-29207 (0.9 Mb)
Sample 14311, the largest portion of a 3.2 kg breccia that was collected as a grab sample near Flank Crater at the location marked Dg on the USGS traverse map. "North" face, photographed in the Lunar Receiving Lab. of Scan downloaded from Lunar Sample Atlas: Lunar Sample 14311. Orientation of the cube does not correspond to sample orientation on the Moon, but does indicate the relative orientation of the sample in the six views.
S71-29208 (0.9 Mb)
Sample 14311, the largest portion of a 3.2 kg breccia that was collected as a grab sample near Flank Crater at the location marked Dg on the USGS traverse map. "East" face, photographed in the Lunar Receiving Lab. of Scan downloaded from Lunar Sample Atlas: Lunar Sample 14311. Orientation of the cube does not correspond to sample orientation on the Moon, but does indicate the relative orientation of the sample in the six views.
71-H-458 ( 141k )
Apollo 14 Commander Alan B. Shepard addresses the House of Representatives on the highlights of the Apollo 14 mission. Stu Roosa (left) and Ed Mitchell are in the second row. Speaker Sam Rayburn presides. 2 March 1971. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
71-H-454 ( 122k )
Stu Roosa (hand on his chin), Al Shepard, NASA Acting Administrator George Low, and Ed Mitchell appear before House committee on Science and Astronautics. 2 March 1971. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
71-HC-440 ( 176k or 866k )
Stu Roosa (second left), Ed Mitchell, and Al Shepard appear on the Tonight show with guest host Joey Bishop (right) and Ed McMahon (far left). 8 March 1971. Scan by Kipp Teague.
Flown Checklist: LMP ALSEP Sketch and 1+44 Procedures ( 279k)
Photo of display at the Astronaut Hall of Fame, Titusville, Florida. May 2002. Photo and scan courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann.
Flown Checklist: CDR Cone Crater, Stations D and E ( 293k)
Photo of display at the Astronaut Hall of Fame, Titusville, Florida. May 2002. Photo and scan courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann.
Flown LM Control Stick ( 460k)
Photo of display at the Astronaut Hall of Fame, Titusville, Florida. May 2002. Photo and scan courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann.
Ed Mitchell's Flown Omega ( 158k)
Photo of display at the Astronaut Hall of Fame, Titusville, Florida. May 2002. Photo and scan courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann.
Al Shepard's Flown Righthand PLSS Strap ( 677k)
Photo of display at the Astronaut Hall of Fame, Titusville, Florida. May 2002. Photo and scan courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann.
Flown Spring Scale ( 468k )
Photo of display at the Astronaut Hall of Fame, Titusville, Florida. May 2002. Photo and scan courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann.
Interior of Kitty Hawk ( 1266k)
Photo of display at the Astronaut Hall of Fame, Titusville, Florida. May 2002. Photo and scan courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann.
"Dixie cup" Sample bags and Dispenser ( 451k )
This type of sample bag was flown on both Apollo 12 and Apollo 14. The dispenser was attached to the HTC. Photo of Astronaut Hall of Fame display and scan courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann. 2002.
Guenter Klink Helmet ( 161k)
Photo of display at the Guenter Wendt residence. May 2002. Photo and scan courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann.
Left Arm Red Stripe ( 154k)
This red stripe on the left arm of Al's suit was photographed at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum's Garber Facility. August 2004. Photo and scan courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann.
Antares CDR Handcontroller (ACA) ( 0.9 Mb)
This flown handcontroller ( Attitude Control Assembly or ACA ) was photographed at the Astronaut Hall of Fame, Titusville, Florida in 2005. Photo courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann.
Antares LMP Handcontroller (ACA) ( 0.9 Mb)
This flown handcontroller ( Attitude Control Assembly or ACA ) has been mounted in a wooden display box and was photographed at Ed MItchell's home in 2006. See three additional photos, below. Photo courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann.
Antares LMP Handcontroller (ACA) - 1 ( 0.8 Mb)
View of the flown handcontroller from the astronaut's right. Photo courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann.
Antares LMP Handcontroller - 2 ( 0.7 Mb)
View of the flown handcontroller from the side nearest the spacecraft window. Photo courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann.
Antares LMP Handcontroller - 3 ( 0.7 Mb)
Close-up of the electrical connectors. Photo courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann.

Mission Report Figures

Figure 3-1 ( 1.3Mb or 231k )

EVA-1 and EVA-2 traverse map.
Figure 7-1 ( 2.7Mb )
Time history of control system parameters during multiple docking attempts.
Figure 9-29 ( 21k )
Flight plan activities 0 - 10 hours.
Figure A-2 ( 418k or 231k )
Diagram showing equipment stowage on the Modular Equipment Transporter (MET)

Preliminary Science Report Figures

Figure 9-4 ( 138k )

ALSEP gas concentration during EVA-2 depress.
Figure 9-5 ( 142k )
ALSEP gas concentration during depress for equipment jettison.
Figure 13-3b ( 530k )
Documentation photo (AS14-68-9393a) of LPM deployed at Station A.

EMU Handbook Figures

Figure 1-23 ( 88k )

Gas Connectors.
Figure 1-24 ( 79k )
Multiple Water Connectors.
Figure 1-28 ( 110k )
Pressure Relief Valve.

 

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