Medical Implications Of The Chimpanzee Flights

The two chimpanzee flights in Project Mercury were to reveal significant medical data. The suborbital flight of Ham was without complications, but it was considerably less complex than Enosí orbital flight.

In the Mercury-Atlas 5 (MA-5) orbital flight, Enos performed a complex multiple operant task as lie twice orbited the earth. The 42-pound subject, whose age was estimated to be 63 months, had been exposed to simulated launch accelerations on the centrifuge at the University of California. He had also served as a subject for a laboratory model of a 14-day flight. Over a 16-month period he had received a total of approximately 1,263 hours of training, of which 343 hours were accomplished under restraint conditions in a model of the actual couch used in flight.6
 
According to Henry, the results of the two animal flights (Ham and Enos) showed that:

On the basis of the flight, Henry and his group drew the following conclusions: The experience gained from the two animal flights (MR-2 and MA-5) was, however, not the only source of information available on space flight.
 

6.  Frederick H. Rohles, Jr., Marvin E. Grunzke, and Herbert H. Reynolds, "Performance Aspects of the MA-5 Flight," ch. 9 in Results of the Project Mercury Ballistic and Orbital Chimpanzee Flights, NASA SP-39, 1963.

7.  James P. Henry, "Synopsis of the Results of the MR-2 and MA-5 Flights," ch. 1 in Results of the Project Mercury Ballistic and Orbital Chimpanzee Flights, NASA SP-39, 1963.
 


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