Apollo 12 Multimedia

Apollo 12 Image Library

Figure Captions Copyright © 1995 by Eric M. Jones.
All rights reserved.
HTML Design by Brian W. Lawrence.
Last revised 9 July 2014.

 

No copyright is asserted for NASA photographs. If a recognizable person appears in a photo, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. Photos may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA or by any NASA employee of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if a NASA photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.

NASA photos reproduced from this archive should include photo credit to "NASA" or "National Aeronautics and Space Administration" and should include scanning credit to the appropriate individuals or agencies as noted in the captions.

We have begun adding scans of the original film. These scans are being done by NASA Johnson, with some post-processing by Kipp Teague. The film is scanned at 4096 x 4096 pixels per image. Kipp reduces each digital image to approximately 2350 x 2350 pixels (equivalent to 300 dpi) and does minor adjustments of levels to ensure that (1) brightly lit areas of lunar soil are neutral grey, (2) objects with known colors (such as the CDR stripes or the LCRU blankets) look right, and (3) information in bright or dark areas is not lost. These images from original film are indicated by the notation 'OF300' in the image description. In each case, a 900 x 900 pixel version is also provided.


Anaglyphs in the image libraries created from sequential panorama frames by the ALSJ editor exist only because of Yuri Krasilnikov's willingness to teach me the art. Whatever value the anaglyphs have is due to Yuri's insights and guidance. Flaws are my doing. Briefly, panorama stitching software Hugin is used to create both non-stereo pan assemblies and remapped versions of the images. The latter are then made into anaglyphs using GIMP. The individual remapped images are linked from the corresponding Library entries for the original frames. The remapped images can be used to create stereo views using other methods.


Journal Contributor Paul White has made detailed comparisons of cloud patterns seen in a large number of Apollo images with imagery taken at close to the same time by various meteorlogical satellites.


For those interested in the subject of Apollo Photography and the Color of the Moon, see a brief discussion written for the ALSJ by Michael Light.


This Apollo 12 Image Library contains all of the pictures taken on the lunar surface by the astronauts together with pictures from pre-flight training and pictures of equipment and the flight hardware. High-resolution version of many of the lunar surface images are included. A source for both thumbnail and low -resolution versions of the lunar surface images is a website compiled by Paul Spudis and colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston.


Journal Contributor Paul White has made detailed comparisons of cloud patterns seen in a large number of Apollo images with imagery taken at close to the same time by various meteorlogical satellites.


Sections:


Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera Images
Original LROC image courtesy NASA/GSFC/ASU. Deconvovled/enhanced versions courtesy NASA/GSFC/ASU/GoneToPlaid.


LROC Images of the Apollo 12 Landing Site in order of Solar Phase from Sunrise to Sunset

Date and Time (UTC)
LROC Image
Solar El / Az
LRO Altitude
(km)

Horiz/Vert Res.
(m/px)

Lighting
Features
22 Jun 2010
M131806467L
8.0/89.2
42.5
0.43/0.55
Early Morn.

29 Nov 2009 03:34:10
M114104917R
31.9/89.3
42.8
0.43/0.55
Mid. Morn.

01 Apr 2010 02:35:56
M124728623L
84.7/25.6
44.3
0.45/0.55
Noon

05 Oct 2009 12:46:55
M109386083R
86.3/61.9
44.9
0.45/0.55
Noon

08 Sep 2009 07:48:39 M107035386R 65.1/274.3 109.3 1.16/1.15
Early Aft.

29 Aug 2010 05:37:30
M137699517L
58.7/272.8
42.5
0.43/0.55
Mid. Aft.

11 Aug 2009 20:46:34
M104662862R 40.5/272.1
103.1
1.09/1.09
Mid. Aft.

05 Feb 2010 First of Two Passes 10:34:26
M120005333R 37.8/273.4 43.0
0.48/0.55
Mid. Aft.

05 Feb 2010 Second of Two Passes 12:27:48
M120012135R
36.9/273.3
43.2
0.49/0.55
Mid. Aft.
1 Aug 2010 21:43:07
M135338254R
32.6/271.2
42.6
0.46/0.55
Mid. Aft.

09 Jan 2010 04:27:29
M117650516R
9.3/270.5
43.1
0.44/0.55
Late Aft.

05 Jul 2010 15:41:46
M132983773R
5.7/270.3
42.4
0.45/0.55
Late Aft.


[Journal Contributor James Fincannon has used sunrise-to-sunset sequences of LROC images on the site to demonstrate that, as of 2009-2011, the Apollo 12 flag is still aloft and casting a shadow. The shadow cast by the erectable S-band antenna has also been identified.]
11 August 2009 20:46:34 UTC; Solar El/Az 40.5/272.1; LRO altitude 103.1 km. (3.9 Mb)
Yuri Krasilnikov has created an animated gif comparing the LROC image with the post-flight traverse map downloaded from the LPI site. Labeled versions and a link to the raw file (M104662862R) are available at the LROC website.

Thomas Schwagmeier has created a composite highlighting the component craters of the Snowman.

Deconvolved, 0.5 m/pixel (5.6 Mb TIF); deconvolved and enhanced 0.5 m/pixel (6.2 Mb TIF), and 1.0 m/pixel (3.9 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

08 September 2009 07:48:39 UTC; Solar El/Az 65.1/274.3; LRO altitude 109.3 km; resolution 1.15m/pixel. (1.1 Mb)
The raw image is M107035386R.

Deconvolved, 0.5 m/pixel (
4.4 Mb TIF) version by GoneToPlaid.
05 October 2009 12:46:55 UTC; Solar El/Az 86.3/61.9; LRO altitude 44.9 km. (3.4 Mb)
With the Sun close to the zenith the range of brightness in the field-of-view is narrow. The disturbed areas near the LM and Surveyor III are the darkest portions of the image but, up close, would not appear as dark as they seem to be in the image. A labeled detail shows the LM and ALSEP. Note that portions of the ribbon cables connecting the SIDE/CCIG and LSM to the Central Station are quite bright. The shiny, surface of the cables is a good sunlight reflector so that, with the Sun and the spacecraft both virtually at the zenith, those portions of the cable which are lying flat on the surface are bright. Pete's photo AS12-46-6820 shows the SIDE/CCIG cable running off to the right. Although the cable clearly has up/down 'waves', it doesn't appear to be twisted. Labeled versions and a link to the raw file (M109386083RE) are available at the LROC website.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (3.1 Mb TIF) and 0.5 m/pixel (3.4 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

29 November 2009 03:34:10 UTC; Solar El/Az 31.9/89.3; LRO altitude 42.8 km. ( 6.6 Mb )
The raw image is M114104917R. See, also, a labeled version ( 0.8 Mb ). A labeled 2x detail shows features at the ALSEP site. Late in EVA-1, Pete and Al ran out to the rim of Middle Crescent Crater, where Pete took a pair of partial pans showing the crater. A variety of craters and boulders in the crater are identified in a comparison ( 5.1 Mb ) between Pete's first pan and the 29 Nov 2009 LROC image.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (3.1 Mb TIF) and 0.5 m/pixel (3.4 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

09 January 2010 04:27:29 UTC; Solar El/Az 9.3/270.5; LRO altitude 43.1 km; resolution 0.49m/pixel ( 8.4 Mb )
The raw image is M117650516R. See, also, a labeled version ( 1.3 Mb ).

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (10 Mb TIF); deconvolved/gamma-corrected 0.25 m/pixel (12 Mb TIF); deconvolved 0.5 m/pixel (3.6 Mb TIF) and deconvolved/gamma-corrected 0.5 m (3.6 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

05 February 2010 10:34:26 UTC (First of Two Passes); Solar El/Az 37.8/273.4; LRO altitude 43.0 km; resolution 0.51m/pixel ( 8.1 Mb )
The raw image is M120005333R.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (9 Mb TIF); deconvolved/gamma-corrected 0.25 m/pixel (12 Mb TIF); deconvolved 0.5 m/pixel (3.6 Mb TIF) and deconvolved/gamma-corrected 0.5 m (4.4 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

Thomas Schwagmeier has created a detail with craters and other features labeled.

05 February 2010 12:27:48 UTC (Second of Two Passes); Solar El/Az 36.9/273.3; LRO altitude 43 km; resolution 0.51m/pixel ( 8.9 Mb )
The raw image is M120012135R. Images of the Apollo 12 site were obtained on two successive LRO orbits on this date. A comparison between details of the LM/ALSEP area show a number of differences in the appearance of specific features near the LM and at the ALSEP site. Some may be due to differences in viewing angles and solar elevation. Others may be due to imaging anomalies. No processing has been done to the screen grabs (done in Mid-August 2010) other than cropping.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (12 Mb TIF); deconvolved/gamma-corrected 0.25 m/pixel (15 Mb TIF); deconvolved 0.5 m/pixel (3.0 Mb TIF) and deconvolved/gamma-corrected 0.5 m (4.1 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

01 April 2010 02:35:56 UTC; Solar El/Az 84.7/25.6; LRO altitude 44.3 km; resolution 0.45 m/pixel (width) and 0.55 m/pixel (height)
The raw image is M124728623L.  Deconvolved 0.5 m/pixel (10 Mb TIF); deconvolved 0.5 m/pixel (2.8 Mb TIF) and deconvolved/gamma-corrected 0.5 m (3.3 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.
22 June 2010 00:40:00 UTC; Solar El/Az 8.0/89.2; LRO altitude 42.5 km; resolution 0.43 m/pixel (width) and 0.55 m/pixel (height)
Lighting in this image is similar to the lighting early in EVA-1, with just the top of the Surveyor in sunlight.  A detail compares the scene with the 5 February 2010 view with the sun at 37 degrees elevation.  The raw image is M131806467L.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (4.4 Mb TIF) and deconvolved 0.5 m/pixel (4.6 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

5 July 2010 15:41:46 UTC; Solar El/Az 5.7/270.3; LRO altitude 42.4 km; resolution 0.45 m/pixel (width) and 0.55 m/pixel (height)
The raw image is M132983773R.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (4.6 Mb TIF); deconvolved/gamma-corrected 0.25 m/pixel (5.2 Mb TIF); deconvolved 0.5 m/pixel (4.9 Mb TIF) and deconvolved/gamma-corrected 0.5 m (6.1 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

1 August 2010 21:43:07 UTC; Solar El/Az 32.6/271.2; LRO altitude 42.6 km; resolution 0.46 m/pixel (width) and 0.55 m/pixel (height)
The raw image is M135338254R.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (4.3 Mb TIF); deconvolved/levels-corrected 0.25 m/pixel (4.9 Mb TIF); deconvolved 0.5 m/pixel (2.9 Mb TIF); and deconvolved/levels-corrected 0.5 m (3.4 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid. See, also, a version (1.7 Mb) cropped to the size of the ASU published version and including enlarged insets of the LM and Surveyor III. The two PLSS show up clearly at the bottom of the ladder.

29 August 2010 05:37:30 UTC; Solar El/Az 58.7/272.8; LRO altitude 42.5 km; resolution 0.43 m/pixel (width) and 0.55 m/pixel (height)
The raw image is M137699517L.

Deconvolved, 0.25 m/pixel (1.8 Mb TIF) and deconvolved 0.5 m/pixel (2.5 Mb TIF) versions by GoneToPlaid.

6 September 2011 (release date) deconvolved to 0.25m/pixel (1.7 Mb)
Downloaded from http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LRO/news/apollo-sites.html. Thomas Schwagmeier and Eric Jones have created a detailed traverse map (1.9 Mb) derived from this LROC low-periapse image and details extracted from the Journal Text.
Animation Comparing M162466771L (44 km) with M168353795L+R(25 km) (123 Mb)
Animation and decompanded/deconvolved/enhanced LROC images by GoneToPlaid. Original LROC images by NASA/GSFC/ASU.

Approach Views and Lunar Orbiter Images

Apollo Zone of Interest ( 2.1Mb or 0.4Mb )

This later map shows five regions, each of which contains one of the five possible Apollo Landing Sites considered for the first landings. These sites were numbered, from east to west, ALS-1 to ALS-5. The sites initially considered for Apollo 12 were ALS-4 and ALS-5, which are in IIIP-11 and IIP-13, respectively. Don Wilhelms's book, To a Rocky Moon, contains a wealth of information about site selection. Data from the first three Lunar Orbiter missions are discussed in pages 150-161; and selection of the Apollo 12 site is discussed in pages 213-217. A labelled version shows the actual Apollo 12 site.
Lunar Orbiter View of the Landing Ellipse (S69-57076) ( 2.1 Mb or 0.4 Mb )
Composite of Lunar Orbiter III strips showing the prime Apollo 12 lunar landing site. The landing ellipse is 7.2 nautical miles by 2.6 nautical miles. The coordinates of the ellipse center are 2 degrees 56 minutes 33 seconds (2.943 degrees) south latitude and 23 degrees 26 minutes 36 seconds (23.443 degrees) west longitude, and the elevation is 1,735,900 meters. Scan courtesy of David Harland.
Lunar Orbiter View of the Landing Site ( 0.5Mb or 87k )
This photo is made up of Lunar Orbiter III strips showing the prime Apollo 12 lunar landing site. Scan by John Pfannerstill. Note that the small white crosses are reference marks. This photo was taken prior to the Surveyor III landing. The pattern of craters surrounding the landing site came to be known as the Snowman and the origin of the name is most easily seen in this detail of a site map prepared by geologists at the US Geological Survey in Flagstaff. The white circles surrounding the craters denote the geologists' estimates of the extent of the ejecta blankets and it is those circles that show the Snowman most clearly and, indeed, may have suggested the name.
Lunar Orbiter View of the Landing Site (detail) ( 0.5Mb )
This detail shows head Crater and the larger of the two soil mounds found by the crew on the north rim. Scan by John Pfannerstill. AS12-46- 6793 is a surface-level photo of the mound.
Approach View
Figure 4-9 from the Apollo 12 Mission Report shows the approach view (top) used in training. Head Crater is the large crater just below the top of the frame and Surveyor Crater is the larger crater just below it. Note that this view overemphasizes the apparent depth of the crater below and slightly to the left of Surveyor Crater. The photograph at bottom right is a frame of 16-mm film shot through Al's LM window during the approach. The sketch at the bottom right includes an outline of the Snowman. The large crater beyond and to the right of the Snowman is Middle Crescent Crater, which Pete and Al will visit at the end of EVA-1.
Surveyor Crater Contour Map ( 1.1Mb )
This contour map is reproduced on page 49 in NASA SP-184, Surveyor Program Results, published in 1969. An explanation of the map can be found on a scan of the entire page ( 0.3Mb or 21Mb ). This map was undoubtedly used in planning the EVA-2 entry into the crater and in properly tilting the Surveyor mock-up used in training. Scans courtesy Mary Ann Hagar, Lunar and Planetary Institute.
Descartes Landing Site
This mosaic of Lunar Orbiter strips shows the approach to the Descartes landing site, which Dick Gordon photographed during Apollo 12 orbital operations. John Young and Charlie Duke landed at this site on Apollo 16 and such prominent landmarks as Stone Mountain and the white South Ray ejecta blanket can be seen on the left side of the partial circle drawn around the Descartes site. About 14 minutes prior to the Apollo 12 Powered Descent Initiation (PDI) Pete noted that he was flying over some high mountains and Houston replied that he was probably crossing the very large crater Theophilus, which is at the lower left in the this mosaic at about 27E 11S.
Apollo Landing Site 5
Pete and Al trained for a landing at this western site prior to the selection of the Surveyor III site for their landing. Frank O'Brien has provided an approach map (1090k) and a map showing the landing ellipse (821k) for ALS 5. See the discussion at 113:03:55.
Targets of Opportunity
This map ( 2348k ) shows CSM ground tracks and various photographic targets. There is a legend at the upper right. Scan by Frank O'Brien.
CSM Ground Track for Revolutions 1, 18, 19, 38, 39, 45
This map ( 1358k ) shows CSM ground tracks for the first orbit after Lunar Orbit insertion (Rev 1), for the landing (Revs 18 and 19), for LM liftoff and rendezvous (Revs 38 and 39) and for TransEarth Injection (45). Scan by Frank O'Brien.

Landing Site Maps/Images

 

Red-Blue Anaglyph from LROC images ((0.7 MB)
Anaglyph by Patrick Vantuyne.
September 2011 Traverse Map (1.9 Mb)
Thomas Schwagmeier and Eric Jones have created a detailed traverse map derived from LROC low-periapse image M168353795R (released 6 September 2011) and traverse details extracted from the Journal Text. See, also, a version with the traverses drawn on the LRO image, and an animated version.
The Snowman in Rome 0.3 Mb PDF
Schwagmeier and Jones have superimposed the Apollo 12 traverse map with a simplified map of Rome, with Surveyor Crater coinciding with the Colosseum. We have also done a superposition of the traverse map with a map of the Vatican. See, also individual JPEG versions of the Rome (2.4 Mb) and Vatican (1.2 Mb) comparisons.
LM Lunar Surface Maps
This large set of maps includes a view of the landing ellipse and its surroundings at 1:100,000, three 1:25,000 maps covering just the ellipse, and a large set 1:5000 maps of much the same area. Some of the maps, particularly around the landing site, have geologic features marked. Four maps show traverses laid out for landings at four different locations around Surveyor Crater.
69-H-1549
This September 1969 diagram shows a preliminary landing spot northeast of the Snowman's left foot and about 250 feet (75 meters) east of Landing Point 1 of later maps. Compare with LSE 7-F. Scan by Frederic Artner.
The following maps were produced for use by the crew while on the lunar surface. The coordinate system helped them discuss locations with Houston. Note that various traverse routes, dependent on four possible landing locations, are sketched on some of the maps. Houston and the crew planned the actual traverses around these designs once they knew where Intrepid had touched down.

LAM 7 ( 3.0 Mb or 0.4 Mb )

This 1:100,000 scale map shows an area of about 25 x 20 kilometers centered on the center of the landing ellipse. Each of the small squares is 1 km across.
LSE 7-F ( 0.3 Mb )
This 1:5000 composite is made from portions of LSE 7-6g and LSE7-7g and shows four possible traverses laid out around Surveyor Crater based on landings at Points 1, 2, 3 and 4.
LSE 7-6G Site 4 and Post-EVA-1 Plan ( 3.2 Mb or 0.4 Mb )
This 1:5000 map shows the traverse planned for a landing at Site 4, just to the west of Sharp crater and the post-landing traverse plan drawn in by hand in dark ink. The collection of maps from which this image was scanned is marked - probably with a felt-tipped pen - 'PAO' - and may well have been marked shortly before, or even during, the time Ed Gibson was describing the traverse plan to the crew at 121:18:14 or, in more detail, at 129:38:43.
LSE 7-6G and How the Snowman Got His Name (515k)
The Snowman is the cluster of craters that surrounds their target point. It can be seen slightly left of center on a large-scale map of the landing site. Surveyor Crater is centered at about N.3/29.5 and Head Crater - the Snowman's head - is immediately to the right of Surveyor Crater at N.4/28.6. The Snowman's feet are at N.4/30.7 and M.4/30.7. See, also, a version of LROC image M120005333R labeled by Thomas Schwagmeier.

I have never been impressed that this pattern was easily called the Snowman until, late in 1999, I was looking at one of the USGS site maps covering the immediate area around Surveyor Crater and really saw the Snowman for the first time. The key to success was to look at LSE-7-6G with west at the top and to look, not at the craters, but at the white ejecta circles drawn around them by the geologists who prepared the map. As can readily be seen in a detail, the ejecta circles create a striking Snowman image. Although I can easily imagine Pete Conrad spotting the figure the first time he was shown the map, I have not been able to confirm this conjecture and do not yet know exactly how or when the Snowman got its name. Note that the Snowman's Right foot is labeled "Right Foot"

LSE 7-30 ( 2.4 Mb or 0.3 Mb)
This map section shows a large crater which is 500 meters in diameter and is 4.5 kilometers west of the Apollo 12 landing spot. The grid spacing is 50 meters and the large rock on the northeast crater rim is 20 meters across.
LSE 7-31 ( 2.1 Mb or 0.3 Mb)
This map section shows the area northeast of the 500-m crater.
LSE 7-38 ( 1.9 Mb or 0.3 Mb)
This map section shows the area northwest of the 500-m crater.
LSE 7-39 ( 2.2 Mb or 0.4 Mb )
This map section shows the area southwest of the 500-m crater.
LSE 7-6G -annotated for Site 2 landing ( 315k )
This map section shows the immediate area around the Apollo 12 landing site. Pete landed the LM near map coordinates Q-5/15.2. This map shows the traverse planned for a landing at Point 2 south-southeast of the center of the crater. Note that Head Crater is labeled "Head". Similar labeling of the Snowman's right foot indicates that crater is Right Foot Crater.
LSE 7-6G - annotated for Site 4 landing ( 313k )
This map shows the traverse planned for a landing near Sharp Crater at Point 4, which is at map coordinates K-0/7.0. The actual traverse has been sketched in, probably by someone in Mission Control during the mission, and was an adaptation of the Site 4 traverse.
LSE 7-7G - annotated for Site 1 landing( 333k )
This map shows the traverse that was planned for a landing near Site 1 at map coordinates A-5/18.5, which is north of Surveyor Crater. Note that the ejecta blanket surrounding Left Foot Crater is labelled.
LSM 7-A ( 0.4 Mb or 2.2 Mb )
This large-scale map shows the area west of the planned Apollo 12 landing site. The large crater at the intersection of areas 30, 31, 38 and 39 is 500 meters in diameter and 4.5 km west of the actual landing site. The grid squares are 250 meters across.
LSM 7-B ( 0.5 Mb )
This large-scale map shows the area around the planned landing site. The left foot of the Snowman is just below the numeral "6" and Surveyor Crater is above and slightly to the right of center in area 6.
1991Traverses ( 0.7 Mb )
This map is figure 10.15 from the Lunar Sourcebook, G.H. Heiken, D.T. Vaniman and B.M. French, editors, copyright 1991 by Cambridge University Press, reproduced with permission. The traverses shown on this map were deduced from Hasselblad pictures taken by the crew and from their commentary. NASA photo S69-59538 is another representation of the traverse.

Surveyor III Images

Contour Map of Surveyor Crater (175k)

Apollo 12 ground track during the landing (101k)

Surveyor III scoop marks (142k)

Surveyor III Photo Mosaic ( 1 Mb or 76 Mb )

This mosaic of Surveyor III pictures shows Block Crater just below the rim of Surveyor Crater to the right of center. Scan courtesy Stephen Tellier, LPI. Compare with Al Bean's photos AS12-48-7090 and 7094, which show the relationship of Surveyor III, Block Crater and the LM. Ewan Whitaker compared the positions of large blocks this imagery with block locations seen in Lunar Orbiter imagery to identify the crater that Surveyor III landed in.

Assembled Panoramas

111:58:43 Pre-EVA-1 Window Pan ( 0.1 Mb )

Pete and Al took the frames of this 'pan' out the windows, which means that the righthand and lefthand portions show views from points seperated by a few feet and, necessarily, that the central portions have to be force into a 'fit'. Note that the LM shadow is well to the left of the spacecraft centerline. That is, the shadow is left of a point midway between the left and right clusters of thrusters. The frames are AS12-48- 7023 to 7033. Pan assembled by Dave Byrne.

High-resolution assemblies of the CDR ( 6 Mb ) and LMP ( 9 Mb ) window pans by Eric Jones. Details from 7024 and 7026 show that the bright spot in the center of the shadow at about the boundary between the ascent and descent stage shadows is a patch of lunar surface - including a small rock and small crater - illuminated by sunlight shining through a path between the stages. The path is almost certainly next to the ascent engine bell on the south side.

116:22:29 Pete's 12 O'clock LM Pan ( 890k )
Pete took this pan early in EVA-1 from a position due west of the LM. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took this pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus. Al can be seen in several frames taking documentation photos of the Solar Wind Collector (SWC) that he has just deployed. The frames are AS12-46- 6730 to 6745. Assembly by Dave Byrne.

Full-resolution assembly with anaglyphs in context ( 9 Mb ) by Eric Jones.

Other assemblies by Mike Constantine ( 179k ); Marv Hein ( VR version; and David Harland ( 1.6 Mb ).

116:24:47 Pete's 4 O'clock Pan ( 1.2 Mb )
Pete took this pan from a spot close to the burned-out TV camera. Al is working at the MESA. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus. The frames are AS12-46-6746 to 6763. Assembly by Dave Byrne.

High-resolution, partial, B&W version (1.2 Mb) by David Harland.

High-resolution with anaglyphs in context (20 Mb) by Eric Jones.

116:27:03 Pete's 8 O'clock Pan ( 1.0 Mb )
Pete walked a short way down into Surveyor Crater to take this pan. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus. The frames are AS12-46- 6764 to 6782. Assembled by Dave Byrne.
116:27:03 Al photographing the plus-Y footpad ( 404k )
Frames 6777 to 6780 from Pete's 8 O'clock pan combined and cropped by Erik van Meijgarden.
116:57:52 Pete's ALSEP Site Pan ( 1.1 Mb )
The frames are AS12-46-6796 to 6811. Two of the frames show Al carrying the ALSEP packages out from the LM. the assembly linked immediately above uses the first of the two frames showing Al. Note that, not surprisingly, Al's shadow in the frame the includes him does not match up with his shadow in the next frame to the right which, is, in fact, part of the second frame showing Al. Assembled by Dave Byrne.

Dave Byrne has assembled an alternate version ( 1.1 Mb ) using the second image of Al carrying the ALSEP packages. In this assembly, he is attached to his shadow. Note, also, the shadow of the RTG package, which Al has on his right. Marv Hein has produced a VR version.

118:18:09 Pete's First Pan at Middle Crescent Crater ( 382k )
Pete took this partial pan from the southeast rim of Middle Crescent just before he and Al headed back for the LM. The frames are AS12-46- 6836 to 6844. Note the strong colors at the center of the righthand frames. Examination of successive frames indicate that this related to the camera lens, very likely a dust smudge. Kipp Teague notes "The lens aberration begins at as12-46-6813. It's a blue glow around the astronaut in 6818, again in 6826, a discoloration in other frames, affecting clarity in most, and it's not gone again until 6853 (back in the LM). Whatever the phenomenon is, it has a varying impact on color based on the brightness of the central object in the image. On bright subjects, the aberration adds a blue cast, and on darker subjects, the aberration adds a reddish cast." I note that it also seems to vary with sun angle. Assembly by Dave Byrne.
118:18:09 Pete's First Pan at Middle Crescent Crater, High-Resolution, B&W Assembly ( 3.8 Mb )
Assembly by David Harland using high-resolution scans provided in 2005-2006 by NASA Johnson and processed by Kipp Teague.
118:18:41 Pete's Second Pan at Middle Crescent Crater ( 404k )
Pete stepped to his left to get a second partial pan and, thereby, get a stereo view. The frames are 6845 to 6852. Assembled by Dave Byrne.
118:28:21 Al's 12 O'Clock LM Pan ( 210k )
Al took this pan at the end of EVA-1 while Pete was at the MESA opening the rock box. The frames are AS12-47- 6941 to 6960. Assembly by Dave Byrne.

Full-resolution assembly with anaglyphs in context ( 8 Mb ) by Eric Jones.

118:30:43 Al's 6 O'Clock LM Pan ( 273k )
This pan shows Pete working on the MESA, beyond the plus-Y (north) strut; and, on the other side of the spacecraft, the plutonium fuel cask in the down position. The frames are AS12-47- 6961 to 6981. Assembly by Dave Byrne.

Full-resolution assembly with anaglyphs in context ( 10 Mb ) by Eric Jones.

118:33:10 Al's 4 O'clock LM Pan ( 931k or 189k )
On the lefthand side of this assembly, the ALSEP can be seen in the distance between the flag and the Solar Wind Collector (SWC). The smaller of the two mounds near the ALSEP site can be seen between the ALSEP instruments and the SWC. The frames are AS12-47- 6982 to 7006. Assembly by Dave Byrne.

David Harland has assembled the portion showing Pete at the MESA ( 146k ).

Kipp Teague has assembled a wider version ( 191k ) , including Surveyor Crater at the left and the U. S. Flag and the TV camera at the right.

Warren Harold at NASA Johnson has assembled an alternate version of this pan.

118:33:10 Al's 4 O'clock LM Pan - High Resolution Assembly ( 5.4 Mb or 477k )
On the lefthand side of this assembly, the ALSEP can be seen in the distance between the flag and the Solar Wind Collector (SWC). The smaller of the two mounds near the ALSEP site can be seen between the ALSEP instruments and the SWC. The frames are AS12-47- 6982 to 7006. Assembly by Erik van Meijgaarden.

Mike Constantine has created a continuous version in QuickTime wrap-around format ( 1.0 Mb ).

120:10:34 Post-EVA-1 Color Pan ( 0.6 Mb )
Pete and Al used up the film remaining on the color magazine that Pete used during EVA-1. The frames are AS12-46- 6853 to 6867. Assembly by Dave Byrne.
132:12:17 Portrait of Head Crater ( 96k )
Pete took a series of polarization pictures near the rim of Head Crater. Dave Byrne has used frame AS12-49-7174, 76, and 86 to create this pseudo-pan.
132:31:20 Al's Triple Craters Pan (50k)
Al took a three-photo portrait of Triple Crater. The frames are 7056 to 7058. Assembly by Dave Byrne.
132:31:20 Al's Triple Craters Pan, High-Resolution, B&W Version (2.8 Mb)
Assembly by David Harland from high-resolution scans provided by JSC in 2005-2006 and processed by Kipp Teague.132:31:52 Pete's Triple Craters Pan (245k)
Pete took this pan from the Triple Craters location just west of Head Crater. Note that Al was moving around while Pete was taking the pan and, consequently, he and his shadow appear in different places in various frames. The frames are AS12-49- 7201 to 7216. Assembly by Dave Byrne.
132:38:22 Pete's Left-to-Right Bench Crater Partial Pan ( 3.9 Mb )
This partial pan shows the interior of Bench Crater as seen from the northwest rim. The frames are AS12-49- 7223 to 7228. Assembly by Eric Jones.

Pete got enough overlap between the frames that a stereo image of Bench Crater (6.6 Mb) could be assembled.

Alternate assembly (3.5 Mb) by David Harland.

132:38:22 Pete's Right-to-Left Bench Crater Partial Pan (3.2 Mb)
After taking the first partial pan, Pete stepped to his left and took a second partial pan, sweeping the crater in the opposite direction. The frames are 7229 and ending with 7233 Assembly by Eric Jones.
132:53:22 Pete's Sharp Traverse Pan (208k)
Pete took a pan during the brief traverse from Bench Crater to Sharp Crater. Assembly by Dave Byrne.
132:56:44 Pete's First Sharp Crater Partial Pan (107k)
Pete took this partial pan of the interior of Sharp from the east rim. Assembly by David Harland.
132:57:33 Sharp Crater Pan 2 (64k)
After taking a right-to-left partial pan, Pete stepped to his left and took a left-to-right partial pan of the interior of Sharp. Assembly by Dave Byrne.
132:57:33 Sharp Crater Pan 2 - High Resolution, B&W Assembly (3.2 Mb)
Assembly by David Harland from high-resolution scans of the original film provided by NASA Johnson in 2005-2007 and processed by Kipp Teague.
133:36:44 Al's Halo Crater Pan (217k)
Al took this pan at the double core site about twenty meters south of Halo Crater, which he and Pete never did recognize. Assembly by Dave Byrne.
133:45:36 Al's Partial Pan of Surveyor Crater (28k)
Al started a pan of Surveyor Crater to finish up the film on Magazine 49. He only got four frames, of which two are useful. Assembly by Dave Byrne.
133:59:16 Al's 'Little Lines' Mini Pan (69k)
Al took this three-picture sequence once he and Pete finished their approach to Surveyor III from the southern rim. The frames are 7094-96. Assembly by Dave Byrne.

Vlad Pustynski has added 7097 and a portion of 7092 to make a high-resolution, seamless version (9 Mb).

134:06:25 Surveyor Scoop Arm ( 94k )
Al Bean took this series of pictures showing the extended scoop arm. Assembly by Dave Byrne.

The Surveyor III scoop was designed by Caltech Professor of Engineering Ronald Scott.

134:40:09 Al's First Block Crater Partial Pan ( 77k )
Block Crater is a small, fresh crater inside Surveyor Crater. Assembly by Dave Byrne.
134:40:09 Al's First Block Crater Partial Pan ( 77k )
Block Crater is a small, fresh crater inside Surveyor Crater. The frames are AS12-48-7141 to 7143. Assembly by Dave Byrne.
134:40:09 Al's Second Block Crater Partial Pan ( 68k )
Al stepped to his right to take this second partial of Block Crater. The frames are AS12-48-7144 to 7147. Assembly by Dave Byrne.
134:40:09 2nd Block Crater Partial Pan - High Resolution ( 2.0 Mb )
Assembly by David Harland.
135:45:48 Post-EVA-2 Window Pan ( 148k )
Pete and Al took a series of pictures out the windows, finishing up magazine 48. The frames are AS12-48-7153 to 7171. Assembly by Dave Byrne.

Crew And Equipment Pre-Flight

S69-52336 ( 46k )

Original artwork for the insignia/patch of Apollo 12, the second lunar landing mission. The clipper ship signified that the crew was all-Navy and symbolically related the era of the clipper ship to the era of spaceflight. The portion of the Moon shown is representative of the Ocean of Storms area in which Apollo 12 landed. Scan by NASA Johnson.
CDR PGA Fit Check Summary ( 92k )
This is believed to be the only surviving summary sheet for sessions done at ILC. The suit in question is Pete's flown PGA. 20 February 1969. Scan by Ulrich Lotzmann.
LMP PGA Fit Check Summary ( 92k )
This is believed to be the only surviving summary sheet for sessions done at ILC. The suit in question is Al's flown PGA. 20 February 1969. Scan by Ulrich Lotzmann.
Surveyor Parts Bag ( 280k )
Pre-flight photo of the parts bag hung on the back of a PLSS. The sleeve on the right is designed to hold the scoop while the largest compartment, accessed from the top, will hold the Surveyor TV camera. Digital photo of a Hasselblad contact print by Ulrich Lotzmann.
Surveyor Parts Bag ( 312k )
Pre-flight photo of the parts bag hung on the back of a PLSS. This view from the lefthand side shows the top and bottom straps that are hooked onto the front of the PLSS with carabiners. Compare with a detail from AS12-48-7071. Digital photo of a Hasselblad contact print by Ulrich Lotzmann.
Surveyor Parts Bag ( 232k )
Pre-flight photo of the parts bag hung on the back of a PLSS. View from the rear. Digital photo of a Hasselblad contact print by Ulrich Lotzmann.
Surveyor Parts Bag ( 220k )
Pre-flight photo of the parts bag hung on the back of a PLSS. Mock-up of a Surveyor TV camera being placed in the main compartment of the parts bag. Note the zippered comparment closure. Digital photo of a Hasselblad contact print by Ulrich Lotzmann.
69-H-1554 ( 114k 815k )
Pete Conrad (left), Dick Gordon, and Al Bean pose during a visit to North American Rockwell Space Division, Downey, California for spacecraft checkout. Photo filed 29 September 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1556 ( 143k 992k )
Pete Conrad (left), Dick Gordon, and Al Bean in the Command Module at North American Rockwell Space Division, Downey, California during spacecraft checkout. Photo filed 29 September 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1557 ( 146k or 976k )
(Left to right) Pete Conrad, Dick Gordon, and Al Bean during spacecraft checkout at North American Rockwell Space Division. Photo filed 29 September 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1558 ( 124k )
Pete Conrad (left) and Dick Gordon inspect the Command Module during a visit to North American Rockwell Space Division, Downey, California. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-HC-1034 ( 92k or 793k )
Pete Conrad (left), Dick Gordon, and Al Bean pose during a visit to North American Rockwell Space Division, Downey, California for spacecraft checkout. Photo dated 29 September 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-930 ( 119k or 866k )
Al Bean prepares to enter the Command Module for an Altitude Chamber run. Photo filed 4 June 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-932 ( 115k or 889k )
Dick Gordon (left) and Al Bean prepare to enter the Command Module for an Altitude Chamber run. Photo filed 4 June 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-934 ( 112k or 783k )
Pete Conrad prepares to enter the Command Module for an Altitude Chamber run. Photo filed 4 June 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-991 ( 181k or 1323k )
Support Team member, Astronaut Gerry Carr (left), and Al Bean (right) watch Pete Conrad checking the ease with which the spare PLSS batteries can be removed. Compare with a generic MESA stowage diagram ( 71k ) for the G-H missions (Apollos 11 to 14). Some details of the Apollo 12 MESA stowage differed from the generic diagram. Photo filed 25 June 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1080 ( 146k or 1080k )
A pad technician peers in the Command Module in the Altitude Chamber, probably helping Pete Conrad get settled in the lefthand couch, while Al Bean (center) and Dick Gordon (left) wait their turns. Photo filed 25 June 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1078 ( 128k or 903k )
Al Bean slides into the Command Module for an Altitude Chamber run. Photo filed 25 June 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69C-2960 ( 488k )
Al Bean removes a mock-up of the RTG package from the SEQ Bay while Pete Conrad (seated, center background) watches. Ed Gibson is immediately behind Al, looking to their left. The white caps suggest they are doing a fit check with the flight hardware. Scan by Ulrich Lotzmann.
S69-38852 ( 92k or 457k )
Pete Conrad (left) , Dick Gordon, and Al Bean pose in front of a LM mock-up at the Cape. A training version of the Lunar Surface Magnetometer (LSM) is at Pete's feet and a training version of the Solar Wind Spectrometer Experiment is at Al's feet. Scan by Ulrich Lotzmann.
S69-38859 ( 552k )
Al Bean poses in front of a LM mock-up at the Cape. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-38862 ( 177k or 501k )
Dick Gordon poses in front of a LM mock-up at the Cape. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-38866 ( 197k or 533k )
Pete Conrad poses with his right hand on a Central Station mock-up. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-38992 ( 202k )
Pete Conrad, Dick Gordon, and Al Bean (left to right) pose in front of a LM mock-up at the Cape. September 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S69-34035 ( 2.2 Mb or 244k )
Pete Conrad and Al Bean are shown examining the Passive Seismometer prior to the flight. The fact that they are wearing white gloves, caps, etc suggests that this is the flight hardware. The object in the foreground is the folded-up Hand Tool Carrier (HTC). An open rockbox is behind Al. Note that Al's wristwatch reads 1:15 p.m.
KSC-69PC-525 ( 87k )
Al Bean (left), Dick Gordon, and Pete Conrad during the Apollo 12 rollout. 8 September 1969. Research by J.L. Pickering.
69-H-1598 ( 129k or 962k )
(Left to right) Pete Conrad, Dick Gordon and Al Bean during recovery training. Photo filed 20 September 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1370 ( 150k or 1030k )
Recovery training. 20 September 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1601 ( 120k or 919k )
Recovery training. 20 September 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1599 ( 125k or 865k )
One of the astronauts is hoisted up to the recovery chopper during training. 20 September 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1586 ( 112k )
Al Bean (right) adjusts the straps of the Surveyor parts bag that he has hung on the back of Pete Conrad's PLSS. During the mission, Al puts the parts bag on Pete's PLSS at 131:50:00. Photo filed 30 September 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-HC-1035 ( 147k or 752k )
Pete Conrad (right) and Al Bean practice sampling in the Flight Crew Training building. The Hand Tool Carrier (HTC) is at the left edge of the picture. Photo filed September 1969. Research by J.L. Pickering.
69-HC-1036 ( 138k or 702k )
Pete Conrad (left) opens a weigh bag at the MESA. The Apollo 11 and 12 weigh bags (also know as Saddlebags when worn on the suit) were made of Teflon film. Figure 103 in Judy Allton's Tool Book suggests that the weigh bags were stowed in the rock box. Al Bean is on the ladder at the left. Photo filed September 1969. Research by J.L. Pickering.
S69-55365 ( 203k or 1130k )
Similar to 69-HC-1036 but shot from behind Pete. Shows Al on the ladder and Pete opening a weigh bag at the MESA. The HTC is on Pete's left. Photo filed September 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
69-HC-1037 ( 188k or 861k )
Pete Conrad (right) handles a stack of Dixie-Cup sample bags, which he will stow on the Hand Tool Carrier (HTC) in front of him. Figure 78 in Judy Allton's Tool Book shows a stack of sample bags stowed in an Apollo 14 rockbox. Apollo 12 photo AS12-49-7243 shows the sample bags on the HTC. Al Bean is behind Pete at the MESA removing a weigh bag, possibly from the MESA rather than the open rockbox. Note that two other weigh bags are hanging from the left-front corner of the MESA. Note the orange color of the light transmitted thru the Teflon film. See, also, AS12-46-6783. The Surveyor mock-up used in training is on the right in the background. Photo filed September 1969. Research by J.L. Pickering.
S69-55366 ( 203k or 1130k )
Taken shortly after 69-HC-1037, showing the Dixie-cup stack on the HTC. Note Al Bean's open cuff checklist and his Omega wristwatch strapped to his sleeve just above the blue pressure gauge on his left arm. Photo filed September 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
69-HC-1040 ( 185k or 768k )
Pete Conrad (left) and Al Bean with the HTC in front of them. The stack of Dixie-Cup sample bags is in place. Al is wearing a weigh bag / saddlebag on his left hip and has a set of flat sample bags hanging off the nearest corner with the cylindrical dispenser at the bottom. See, also, Figure 81 in Judy Allton's Tool Book. Photo filed September 1969. Research by J.L. Pickering.
69-HC-1041 ( 118k or 633k )
Pete Conrad during EVA training in the Flight Crew Support Building. Photo filed September 1969. Research by J.L. Pickering.
69-HC-1042 ( 118k or 660k )
Al Bean during EVA training in the Flight Crew Support Building. Photo filed September 1969. Research by J.L. Pickering.
69-H-1633 ( 120k )
During a presentation to the press, Al Bean holds a mockup of the Surveyor III TV Camera he and Pete Conrad removed for return to Earth. The ALSEP Central Station is on the left, with one arm of the magnetometer in the foreground. The Passive Seismic Experiment is behind Alan on the right. Photo filed 2 October 1969. Scan by Frederic Artner.
69-H-1637 ( 122k )
Al Bean describes the ALSEP equipment and other items for the press. The Lunar Surface Magnetometer (LSM is in the left foreground, with the Central Station behind. Next right is the Solar Wind Spectrometer (SWS), then the Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment (SIDE), with a mock-up of the Surveyor TV camera behind the SIDE. The shiny cylinder surrounded by a thermal skirt is the Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE). Alan has a pair of EVA gloves in his left hand. A PLSS in on the table at the right edge of the photo with the deployable S-band antenna behind. Photo filed 2 October 1969. Scan by Frederic Artner.
69-H-1638 ( 129k )
During a presentation for the press, Al Bean gestures to the Central Station antenna mast, which served as a carrybar when he brought the two ALSEP packages out to the deployment site from the LM. The base of one of the packages is just in front of him. In the foreground, an undeployed magnetometer is partly visible on the left edge of the photo, a deployed magnetometer is in the center, and the Solar Wind Spectrometer is on the right. Photo filed 2 October 1969. Scan by Frederic Artner.
69-H-1618 ( 0.3Mb or 1.0Mb )
Pete Conrad works at the Modular Equipment Stowage Assembly (MESA), stowing a contrast charts on the Hand Tool Carrier (HTC). During the mission, he will do this shortly before 131:44:24. A detail ( 0.3Mb ) shows the HTC. Photo filed 6 October 1969. Research by Ed Hengeveld. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
KSC-69PC-0549 ( 164k )
Al Bean, right, takes the boltcutters from Pete Conrad. The Hand Tool Carrier (HTC) is in the right-hand foreground and a weighbag is attached to the front edge of the MESA at the left side of the photo. Note the so-called 'saddlebag' attached to Al's left hip. A mock-up of Surveyor III can be seen beyond the LM ladder. Ulli Lotzmann has provided a high-resolution detail of the boltcutters, which Pete and Al will use to remove the TV camera and other items from Surveyor III. 6 October 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-545 ( 244k )
Al Bean (right) hammers a core tube into a box full of lunar soil simulant during training. Pete Conrad watches. Note that the lettering on Pete's RCU is red. 6 October 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-544 ( 140k or 341k)
While training indoors at the Cape, Al Bean appears to be holding a sample bag containing soil. Also visible are his 'saddlebag', watch (left sleeve) and camera decals. 6 October 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-546 ( 195k or 377k )
Shows Al photographing the Surveyor mock-up in the training building during a 'press-invited' session on 6 October 1969, six weeks before the mission. Note that the lettering on his RCU is in black. 'Heads-up' by Mike Harney and Adam Bootle. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-55667 ( 163k )
Pete Conrad (left) carries the gnomon while Al Bean carries the Hand Tool Carrier during geology training at the Cinder Lake crater field, near Sunset Crater, Arizona. 10 October 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1679 ( 164k )
Pete Conrad (left) and Al Bean in a LM simulator. Photo filed 21 October 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-559 ( 148k )
The Apollo 12 crew poses on the ladder of a LM mockup. From top to bottom, they are Lunar Module Pilot (LMP) Al Bean, Command Module Pilot (CMP) Dick Gordon, and Mission Commander (CDR) Pete Conrad. 22 October 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-560 ( 176k or 702k )
Pete Conrad (left) Dick Gordon, and Al Bean pose in front of a simulator. Research by J.L. Pickering.
S69-56697 ( 198k or 902k )
Pete Conrad (front), Dick Gordon (middle), and Al Bean (rear) pose in front of a simulator. Scan by NASA Johnson.
S69-56702 ( 129k )
Dick Gordon works with a Hasselblad camera - equipped with a 500-mm lens - in the Command Module Simulator at the Kennedy Space Center. 22 October 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
108-KSC-369C-317/8 ( 148k )
This characteristically-irreverant portrait of the All-Navy crew of Apollo 12 was taken on 22 October 1969. From top to bottom, they are Bean, Gordon, and Conrad. Scan by Ulrich Lotzmann.
KSC-69P-814 ( 124k or 842k )
Pete Conrad (left) and Al Bean pose in the LM simulator at the Kennedy Space Center. Al has his right hand on the AOT guard. 22 October 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S69-56699 ( 96k or 446k)
Pete Conrad (left) and Al Bean pose in the LM simulator at the Kennedy Space Center. 22 October 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-56700 ( 72k )
This fisheye view shows Pete Conrad (left) and Al Bean in the LM simulator at the Kennedy Space Center on 22 October 1969. With his right hand, Al is holding the guard that protects the Alignment Optical Telescope (AOT). The receptacles in the Environmental Control System for the lithium hydroxide canisters can be seen at the right. The docking hatch is overhead.
S69-56058 ( 84k )
Pete Conrad flies the Lunar Landing Training Vehicle (LLTV) at Ellington Air Force Base. 25 October 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-586 ( 108k )
(Left to right) Pete Conrad, Dick Gordon, and Al Bean pose with the Apollo 12 Saturn V in the background on the pad at the Cape on 29 October 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-579 ( 112k or 556k )
Pete Conrad (foreground), Dick Gordon (middle distance) and Alan Bean being suited for an Apollo 12 Countdown Demonstration Test. 29 October 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1633 ( 52k )
At a press conference, Al Bean holds up a mockup of the Surveyor III TV camera that he and Pete Conrad will retrieve during Apollo 12. Other gear on display include the Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE) which is at Al's feet and the Central Station on the left side of the picture. One arm of the Lunar Surface Magnetometer can be seen at the lower left in front of the Central Station. Photo released 2 October 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-55362 ( 60k )
Al Bean (right) hammers a core tube into a box full of granular material. Note the open checklist on Pete Conrads left wrist. 6 October 1969. Scan courtesy Mike Gentry/JSC.
S69-55363 ( 62k )
Al Bean practices taking documentation photos of a mockup of the Surveyor III spacecraft. 6 October 1969. Scan courtesy Mike Gentry/JSC.
S69-55364 ( 67k )
Al Bean (left) takes a pair of boltcutters from Pete Conrad (right). Al will stow the boltcutters in a Surveyor Parts Bag mounted on the back of Pete's PLSS. The boltciutters will be used to remove portions of Suveyor III for return to Earth. The Hand Tool Carrier is in the foreground. 6 October 1969. Scan courtesy Mike Gentry/JSC.
S69-55367 ( 256k )
Pete Conrad (right) and Al Bean work on a Suveyor III mockup in the Crew Training Building at the Kennedy Space Center. The mock-up is mounted on an inclined slope which simulates the inner wall of Surveyor Crater. Note that representations of the trenches and impact tests made by the actual Surveyor III scoop have been painted on the incline. 6 October 1969. Scan by Ulli Lotzmann.
S69-55368 ( 157k or 793k )
Pete Conrad (right) and Al Bean practice sample collection inside the Crew Training Building at the Cape. The Hand Tool Carrier (HTC) is between them and the gnomon is in the foreground. Note that the gnomon is not vertical, an indication that Pete just put it down and that it is still swinging. Pete has the tongs in his left hand and Al has a sample bag in his left hand. Note the 'saddlebag' on Al's left hip. 6 October 1969. Scan by Ulli Lotzmann.
Surveyor Parts Bag ( 51k )
Pete Conrad (left) and Al Bean practice sample collection inside the Crew Training Building at the Cape. The Hand Tool Carrier (HTC) is to Al's right. The gnomon is in the foreground. Pete is using the tongs and appeaers to be giving a sample he's just collected for placement in a sample bag. Pete is wearing the Surveyor Parts Bag on the back of his PLSS. Scan by Ulli Lotzmann.
S69-54411 ( 79k or 255k )
Al Bean (left), Dick Gordon, and Pete Conrad at a press conference. 11 October 1969. Research by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-0594 ( 152k )
Pete Conrad (left) and Al Bean in a LM simulator. The Interim Stowage Assembly (ISA) is at the left and the Environmental Control System (ECS) is at the right. The ceiling-mounted Alignment Optical Telescope (AOT) is above the forward panels. 6 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-54147 ( 156k)
Pete Conrad (right) holds one end of the Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC). Al Bean has the other end in the cabin of a LM mock-up. The Hand Tool Carrier (HTC) is in the foreground and a mock-up of Surveyor III is mounted on an incline beyond the LM. Note the contrast chart hanging from the MESA (left). October 1969. Scan by Ulli Lotzmann.
Pete Conrad's Lunar Boots, Purge Valve, and Red Apple (0.6 Mb)
Close-out photo before the boots were stowed in the LM. The Purge Valve and Red Apple were stowed in one of the boots.
Al Bean's Lunar Boots, Purge Valve, and Red Apple (1.3 Mb)
Close-out photo before the boots were stowed in the LM. The Purge Valve and Red Apple were stowed in one of the boots.
KSC-69PC-588 ( 110k)
Al Bean (left), Dick Gordon, and Pete Conrad in the Command Module as seen from the lower equipment bay. 7 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-621 ( 123k)
Pete Conrad (left), Dick Gordon, and Al Bean pose with one of their matched set of Corvettes. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-620 ( 144k)
Pete Conrad, possibly at Patrick Air Force Base. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-622 ( 110k)
Pete Conrad (left), Dick Gordon, and Al Bean pose next to a T-38. 7 November 1969. Research by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69P-835 ( 58k)
Pete Conrad and, according to Back-up Commander Dave Scott, the "Fourth Crewmember" at the pre-launch breakfast. 14 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1828 ( 114k or 858k )
Pete Conrad at the pre-launch breakfast. 14 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1830 ( 126k or 789k )
On the far side of the table, Tom Stafford (left), Pete Conrad, the Fourth Crewmember (seated against the wall), Dick Gordon, and the Filght Crew Support Team Leader; and, on the near side of the table, Paul Weitz (right) and Al Bean (center) listen to Jim McDivitt (left) at the pre-launch breakfast. 14 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-636 ( 144k or 322k )
Jim McDivitt (left edge of photo, back to camera), Tom Stafford, Pete Conrad, Al Bean, Dick Gordon at the pre-launch breakfast. 14 November 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-637 ( 169k or 1089k )
Tom Stafford (foreground), Pete Conrad, Dick Gordon, and the Flight Crew Support Team Leader at pre-launch breakfast. 14 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1834 ( 136k or 903k )
Dick Gordon during suit-up. 14 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-58882 ( 104k )
Dick Gordon during suit-up. 14 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1831 ( 141k or 990k )
Al Bean during suit-up. 14 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-639 ( 107k )
Al Bean may be checking something strapped to his left arm - possibly his watch - during suit-up for the Apollo 12 launch. 14 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1835 ( 129k or 923k )
Pete Conrad during suit-up. 14 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-640 ( 112k )
A suit tech puts a sandwich in Pete Conrad's left calf pocket during suit-up for the Apollo 12 launch. 14 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-685 ( 139k )
Tom Stafford (left) and Pete Conrad (center) during suit-up for the Apollo 12 launch. 14 November 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-642 ( 134k )
Pete Conrad during suit-up for the Apollo 12 launch. 14 November 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-683 ( 122k )
Pete Conrad during suit-up for the Apollo 12 launch. 14 November 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-643 ( 144k )
Dick Gordon (left) and Al Bean (right) during suit-up for the Apollo 12 launch. 14 November 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-645 ( 165k )
Pete Conrad leads Dick Gordon and Al Bean to the transfer van. 14 November 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
69-H-1832 ( 172k or 1005k )
Pete Conrad leads Dick Gordon and Al Bean to the transfer van. 14 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-646 ( 145k )
The Apollo 12 crew walks to the transfer van that will take them to the pad for launch. Note the rainy weather which, during the ascent, resulted in a lightning discharge that traveled down the exhaust plume. 14 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-647 ( 221k )
Pete Conrad leads Dick Gordon and Al Bean to the transfer van. Tom Stafford is in the doorway wearing a dark coat or sweater. 14 November 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-649 ( 177k )
Pete Conrad leads Dick Gordon and Al Bean into the transfer van. 14 November 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-663 ( 172k or 382k )
The Apollo 12 crew leaves the transfer van at the pad prior to launch. Note the rainy weather which, during the ascent, resulted in a lightning discharge that traveled down the exhaust plume. 14 November 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-58885 ( 133k )
White Room activities while the crew gets in the Command Module for launch. Al Bean is at the right and Pete Conrad is in the center. 14 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-676 ( 133k )
Almost identical to S69-58885. White Room activities. 14 November 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.

Vehicle Assembly, Transport and Launch Pad Preps

S69-34675 ( 320k or 1561k )

Apollo 12 Saturn V components in the Vertical Assembly Building (VAB). 7 May 1969. Research by J.L. Pickering. Scan courtesy NASA.
KSC-69P-396 ( 168k )
Apollo 12 S-II stage in the Vertical Assembly Building (VAB). 21 May 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S69-36871 ( 297k or 1469k )
Apollo 12 Saturn V stacking in the Vertical Assembly Building (VAB). 28 May 1969. Research by J.L. Pickering. Scan courtesy NASA.
69-H-1666 ( 92k or 714k )
Intrepid prior to attachment of the landing gear. June 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69P-511 ( 183k )
Mr. Gordon Oxborrow is shown taking chemical samples of LM-6. 9 June 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
S69-39262 ( 148k or 678k )
Apollo 12 LM Intrepid being moved to integration work stand. 23 June 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-39323 ( 92k or 635k )
Command and Service Module atop the adapter stage being driven into the Vehicle Assembly Building. 30 June 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1668 ( 118k or 1025k )
Apollo 12 command and service modules hoisted above test stand. 30 June 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-39326 ( 139k )
Apollo 12 spacecraft being prepared for mating in High Bay 3 of the VAB. 1 July 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1667 ( 116k or 548k )
Apollo 12 LM Intrepid in its adapter stage being lowered into position atop the Saturn V stack in the Vehicle Assembly Building High Bay 3. Photo filed 2 July 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-HC-974 ( 232k )
Aerial photo from the roof of the Vehicle Assembly Building of the Apollo 12 Saturn V being transported to the pad on the crawler. Photo filed 8 September 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-51309 ( 200k or 429k )
View from the roof of the Vehicle Assembly building of the Apollo 12 Saturn V being transported to the Pad on the crawler. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-51308 ( 308k or 664k )
Top-down view of the Apollo Saturn V roll-out. 8 September 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1459 ( 103k )
Apollo 12 Saturn V roll-out. 8 September 1969. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
69-H-1457 ( 129k or 1043k )
Apollo 12 Saturn V roll-out. 8 September 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-524 ( 186k or 431k )
Apollo 12 Saturn V leaves the Vertical Assembly Building. 8 September 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-529 ( 275k or 456k )
Apollo 12 Saturn V rollout. 8 September 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-531 ( 234k or 600k )
Apollo 12 Saturn V rollout past the Mobile Service Structure (MSS). 8 September 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-51299 ( 186k or 476k )
Apollo 12 Saturn V rollout. Scan by Kipp Teague.
69-H-1458 ( 128k or 319k )
Apollo 12 Saturn V on pad 39-A. Scans by Kipp Teague.
S69-56596 ( 96k or 488k )
Nighttime, ground level view of Launch Complex 39 and Apollo 12 spacecraft. October 28, 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
KSC-69PC-570 ( 211k or 431k )
An overhead view of the firing room at the Cape during the Apollo 12 Countdown Demonstration Test. 29 October 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague/J.L. Pickering.
69-H-1725 ( 140k )
Apollo 12 Saturn V vents liquid oxygen during a Countdown Demonstration Test. Photo filed 3 November 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-587 ( 144k or 623k )
Apollo 12 Saturn V vents liquid oxygen during a Countdown Demonstration Test on 3 November 1969. Scans by Kipp Teague / J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-583 ( 72k or 129k )
Floodlit Apollo 12 Saturn V on the pad at night. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-56597 ( 96k or 430k )
Floodlit Apollo 12 Saturn V on the pad at night. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
69-HC-1173 ( 152k or 685k )
The 402-ft. high Mobile Service Structure surrounds the Apollo 12 Saturn V on the left at KSC Launch Complex 39A. The launch tower is on the right. The MSS was removed to its park site about 26 hours before launch. Research by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-638 ( 186k )
Apollo 12 Saturn V on pad 39-A several hours prior to launch. November 14, 1969. Scan courtesy NASA Kennedy.
69-HC-1197 ( 216k or 1396k )
Personnel within Firing Room 2 of the Launch Control Center monitor pre-launch activities. Research by J.L. Pickering.

Saturn V Launch

KSC-69PC-597 ( 136k or 321k )

President and Mrs. Nixon arriving at the Cape for the launch of Apollo 12. 14 November 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-369D-540-05 ( 79k )
Jack King, Chief of Public Information at KSC is shown at his console during the Apollo 12 launch. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-659 ( 216k )
Press site at the Kennedy Space Center. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
KSC-69PC-654 ( 135k or 466k )
Apollo 12 lift-off. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-672 ( 76k or 180k )
The Apollo 12 Saturn V rises from the pad. The tail of the rocket has reached about the midpoint of the tower. 14 November 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-58564 ( 203k or 383k )
Apollo 12 launch under heavily overcast skies. 14 November 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-58884 ( 97k or 803k )
Apollo 12 launch. 14 November 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-59475 ( 112k or 273k )
Apollo 12 launch. 14 November 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
KSC-69PC-812BW ( 116k )
Shortly after lift-off - at Ground Elapsed times of 36.5 seconds and 52 seconds - lightning struck both the Apollo 12 Saturn V and the launch tower. 14 November 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.
S69-60068 ( 81k )
View of a lightning bolt during the launch of the Apollo 12 Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center. The silhouetted structure is the mobile launch tower. This electrical discharge between clouds and the ground took place at about 36.5 seconds after lift-off when the Apollo 12 space vehicle was at about 6,000 feet altitude. 14 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69P-856 ( 116k )
Personnel in the Firing Room at the Cape list to the Apollo 12 crew and Mission Control (Houston) overcome the effects of the lightning strike. Note that the picture was taken at 2 min 54 seconds into the mission. 14 November 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.

Mission Support Photos

KSC-69PC-717 ( 95k )

Apollo 12 Command Module approaches splashdown. 24 November 1969. Scan by Kipp Teague.

Mission Photos by Magazine Number

Some images are currently available only as low-resolution scans provided by NASA Johnson in the mid-1990s. The individual scans have TARGA filenames. Markus Mehring has compiled cross-references between those filenames and the NASA photo ID designations customarily used. Other images are available as higher resolution scans from prints and, unless otherwise credited, were provided by Kipp Teague. Beginning in 2004, NASA began to provide scans from original film and, as they become available to the ALSJ, we are using them to replace all prior versions. The scans from original film were done at approximately 4000 by 4000 pixels and are presented at 300 dpi equivalent. They are labeled "OF300".

Magazine 46/Y (Color) Frames 6715-6868

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

Al Bean took the first four frames throught hatch of Pete starting down the ladder. Shortly thereafter, they transfered the camera and magazine to the lunar surface where Pete Conrad used it during EVA-1.


AS12-46-6715 (OF300) ( 118k or 838k )
115:21:24 Pete is on the ladder. We can see his RCU, hose connections and checklist. Note that his OPS antenna is up. The porch and the luanr surface below are reflected in his visor. Al is taking the picture by holding the camera upside-down, at knee height, and is guessing at the pointing. The frame is slightly sunstruck.
AS12-46-6716 (OF300) ( 107k or 844k )
115:20:07 Similar to 6715 but aimed higher.

Kipp Teague has produced a detail which shows Pete's name written in red lettering on his RCU.

Eric Nelson has produced an enhanced version ( 161k ) showing detail on the front of Pete's suit.

AS12-46-6717 (OF300) ( 128k or 892k )
115:20:07 Pete on the ladder.
AS12-46-6718 (OF300) ( 122k or 934k )
115:20:07 This is probably Al's best picture of Pete on the ladder. Ulli Lotzmann and Ken Glover call attention to the pull handle for the Contingency Sampler that can be seen is a detail ( 67k ), probably sticking out of Pete's pocket.
AS12-46-6719 (OF300) ( 258k or 1379k )
115:46:12 Cross-Sun to the south of the area where Pete collected the contingency sample starting at 115:23:55. One of the shallow trenches he made with the sampler is above center.
AS12-46-6720 (OF300) ( 248k or 1385k )
115:46:12 Pete stepped closer to the shallow trench to get this second cross-Sun to the south.
AS12-46-6721 (OF300) ( 253k or 1528k )
115:46:12 Down-Sun of the shallow trench Pete made with the contingency sampler.
AS12-46- (OF300) ( 416k or 1903k )
115:46:12 Cross-Sun to the north of a different place where Pete collected part of the contingency sample.
AS12-46-6722/3 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3.5 Mb or 457k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-46-6723 (OF300) ( 382k or 1743k )
115:46:12 Pete stepped to his left to get this stereo companion to 6722.
AS12-46-6724 (OF300) ( 161k or 988k )
115:49:14 Al kneeling on the porch with his head and arms still in the spacecraft..
AS12-46-6725 (OF300) ( 231k or 1243k )
115:49:14 Al kneeling on the porch with his head and arms still in the spacecraft. He may be reaching for the door so he can pull it partially closed. Journal Contributor Lennie Waugh notes that Pete has given us a good view of the TV camera on the MESA and the TV camera ( 635k ).
AS12-46-6726 (OF300) ( 231k or 1243k )
115:50:57 Al Bean stands on the top rung of the ladder with his hands on the porch rails. The TV camera is on the MESA (at the lower left) pointed at the bottom of the ladder. The thermal shroud that contains the U.S. flag that they will deploy can be seen under the lefthand ladder rail. Note the reflection of the lunar surface in the LM window.
AS12-46-6727 (OF300) ( 218k or 1078k )
115:50:57 Al Bean is about halfway down the ladder, with his right foot on the fourth rung up. He may be reaching down with his right hand to grab the siderail before he steps down with his right foot. An enhanced detail shows the hatch and other features in the shadowed region.
AS12-46-6728 (OF300) ( 230k or 1150k )
115:50:57 Al is one rung up from the bottom of the ladder, with his right hand on the ladder and his right foot on the rung. His OPS antenna doesn't appear to be up. The MESA is at the lower left. Surveyor Crater is visible beyond the ladder.
AS12-46-6729 (OF300) ( 204k or 1143k )
At about 115:51:59, Pete asked Al to pose as he stepped off the LM footpad for the first time. Note the porch rails at the top of the ladder and the curve of Surveyor Crater beyond Al.
AS12-46-6730 (OF300) ( 120k or 878k )
116:22:29. First image of a 16-frame pan Pete took while standing west of the LM, showing the view slightly to the left of down-Sun. Note the blocky-rimmed crater beyond the shadow, above the center of the image, and just below the horizon. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6730-31 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.8 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6731 (OF300) ( 170k or 1075k )
116:22:29 Rightward of 6730. Down-Sun view. The larger of the two mounds that Pete and Al will investigate after deploying the ALSEP is visible at the right side just below the local horizon. As can be seen in a traverse map ( 715k ), the large mound is about 22 degrees north of west as seen from the LM. At the time Pete took this picture ( about 1244 GMT/UTC on 19 November 1969 ), the Sun was almost exactly east of the spacecraft at an azimuth of 91 degrees and at an elevation of 8.4 degrees. The north rim of Head Crater is on a line about halfway between the tip of Pete's shadow and the mound. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6731-32 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6732 (OF300) ( 200k or 1242k )
116:22:29 Rightward of 6731. The larger of the two mounds is labeled in a detail. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6732-33 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.4 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6733 (OF300) ( 208k or 1154k )
116:22:29 Rightward of 6732. The large mound is at the left side of the image. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6733-34 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.9 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6734 (OF300) ( 229k or 1296k )
116:22:29 Rightward of 6733. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6734-35 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.8 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6735 (OF300) ( 231k or 1327k )
116:22:29 Rightward of 6734. In the distance, Al is taking pictures of the Solar Wind Collector (SWC) . Comparing with Al's picture AS12-47-6898, the cross piece on top of the SWC staff and the collector sheet itself both lie in the vertical plane that passed thru Pete's position and are, therefore, virtually edge-on and hard to see. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6735-36 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6736 (OF300) ( 226k or 1305k )
116:22:29 Rightward of 6735. View to the north showing Al, who may be taking AS12-47-6899, a photo documenting the deployment of the Solar Wind Collector (SWC), which is just to the right of Al. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6736-37 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.0 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6737 (OF300) ( 224k or 1227k )
116:22:29 Rightward of 6736. The U.S. flag is on the right and the trail of footprints Al made when he went out to deploy the SWC starts at the lower right. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6737-38 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.0 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6738 (OF300) ( 146k or 840k )
116:22:29 Rightward of 6737. U.S. flag on the left and the S-band antenna almost lost in the sun glare on the right. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6739 (OF300) ( 129k or 757k )
116:22:29 Rightward of 6738. Up-Sun view of the LM and S-band antenna. As mentioned above, the Sun's elevation is about 7.6 degrees. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6740 (OF300) ( 135k or 875k )
116:22:29 Rightward of 6739. View past the south (minus-Y) LM strut toward Surveyor III. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6740-41 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.5 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6741 (OF300) ( 103k or 838k )
116:22:29 Frame from Pete's 12 o'clock pan showing the deep shadow on the eastern wall of Surveyor Crater and, as indicated in a detail, the sunlit solar panels on the Surveyor III spacecraft on the left. Compare with the corresponding frames from Pete's 4 o'clock pan, AS12-46-6746, and his 8 o'clock pan, AS12-46-6769. The body and legs of the Surveyor are in shadow. Note the two overlapping craters on the sunlit, southeast inner wall of Surveyor Crater. Note, also, the blocky rimmed crater just outside the LM shadow in the foreground. These blocks may be ejecta from Surveyor Crater which was buried by regolith sprayed onto the site by other impacts and was then brought back to the surface for a second time (at least) by the impact that made the small crater. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6741-42 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.8 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6742 (OF300) ( 139k or 974k )
116:22:29 Rightward of 6741, showing the southern wall of Surveyor Crater. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6742-43 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.6 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones. Earlier version by Erwin D'Hoore 0.8Mb ).
AS12-46-6743 (OF300) ( 139k or 982k)
116:22:29 Similar to 6742 but aimed slightly lower. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6743-44 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.7 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6744 (OF300) ( 133k or 893k)
116:22:29 Rightward of 6743. View to the south. Note the raised-rim crater on the horizon at the righthand edge of the image. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6744-45 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.6 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6745 (OF300) ( 96k or 758k)
116:22:29 Rightward of 6744, with the raised-rim crater just left of center. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6745-30 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.1 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6746 (OF300) ( 226k or 1323k)
116:22:29 First frame from Pete's 4 o'clock pan showing the deep shadow on the eastern wall of Surveyor Crater and, as indicated in a detail, the sunlit solar panels of Surveyor III. Compare with the corresponding frames from Pete's 12 o'clock pan, AS12-46-6741, and his 8 o'clock pan, AS12-46-6769. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6746-47 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.3 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6747 (OF300) ( 96k or 758k)
116:22:29 Rightward of 6746. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6747-48 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.3 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6748 (OF300) ( 175k or 955k )
116:22:29 Rightward of 6746, showing the minus-Z strut and the back of the LM. As Pete mentions at 118:27:12, he mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus instead of 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6748-49 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.3 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6749 (OF300) ( 188k or 854k)
116:24:47 Al Bean is working at the MESA and the S-Band antenna is at the right edge of the picture. The LM is sitting on the northwest rim of Surveyor Crater and a portion of the crater can be seen on the left side of the picture. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6750 (OF300) ( 197k or 1093k)
116:24:47 Rightward of 6749. Al Bean has moved away from the MESA to the right and is probably starting the LM inspection. The S-Band antenna is at the right edge of the picture. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6750-51 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.3 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6751 (OF300) ( 169k or 1025k)
116:24:47 Rightward of 6751, with the S-Band antenna on the left, the antenna cover next right, and the U.S. flag just to the right of Pete's shadow. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus. Pete took the pan at about 1248 GMT/UTC on 19 November 1969, when the Sun was about 8.4 degrees above the eastern horizon. If the top of Pete's helmet was 2 meters above the ground, on a level surface his shadow would have been 14 meters long.
AS12-46-6751-52 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.4 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6752 (OF300) ( 178k or 1024k)
116:24:47 Rightward of 6751. Down-Sun with the U.S. flag just to the right of Pete's shadow. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6752-53 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.4 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6753 (OF300) ( 208k or 1244k)
116:24:47 Rightward of 6752, with the U.S. flag on the left. Note the foot-grapping TV cable loops in the foreground. Note, also, that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6753-54 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.6 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6754 (OF300) ( 219k or 1281k)
116:24:47 Rightward of 6753, with the Solar Wind Collector (SWC) to the right of center. Note the foot-grapping TV cable loops in the foreground. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6754/5 Red-Blue Anaglyph (912k or 282k)
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-46-6754-55 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.5 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6755 (OF300) ( 191k or 973k)
116:24:47 Rightward of 6754, with the Solar Wind Collector (SWC) at center and the burned-out TV camera on the right. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6755-56 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.2 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6756 ( 194k or 929k)
116:24:47 Rightway of 6755. Close-up of the TV camera, with the Solar Wind Collector (SWC) at the left edge of the picture. Note the loop in the TV cable running off to the left.

Paul Coan, Manned Spaceflight Center Television Subsystem Manager who was responsible for the equipment used on the Apollo spacecraft, writes, "The same type of cable used to carry video and power between the Apollo 11 TV camera and the LM was used during Apollo 12 to power the first color TV camera to be put on the lunar surface. However, the connector on the color camera did not match the connector on the end of the lunar surface cable that was an integral part of the camera handle. (See a detail from Apollo 11 photo S-69-31575 ). Since the design and qualification of the lunar surface cable was so expensive, it was cost prohibitive to replace the connector on the cable. Cost, schedule, and design constraints also precluded replacing the connector on the color camera. So, we decided to build an adapter that provided the interconnection."

In a detail from 6756, the color-camera camera hangs down from the back, with the yellow-coated adapter immediately blow attached to the silver-tube of the 'handle' from the Apollo 11 configuration.

Coan adds, "During testing of the color lunar camera connected to the LM on the pad at KSC, we noticed hum bars in the video. We then realized that the finite resistance of the power circuit in the 100 foot lunar camera cable combined with the switching power supply in the camera was sufficient to inject the hum bars in the video. We had to rework the power supply circuits to eliminate the hum bars. There was some quick redesign/rework done to make the camera work."

"Finally, there was a special room provided at KSC for final checkout of the cameras before they were installed in the spacecraft. So that we could test under controlled lighting conditions, the room was painted totally black and provided with heavy window curtains to eliminate light from outside.".

AS12-46-6756-57 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.5 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6757 (OF300) ( 203k or 1003k)
116:24:47 Rightward of 6756, with the TV camera on the left. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6757-58 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.4 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6758 (OF300) ( 222k or 1258k)
116:24:47 Rightward of 6757, showing the view to the north. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6758-59 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.5 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6759 (OF300) ( 260k or 1462k)
116:24:47 Rightward of 6758. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6759-60 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.6 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6760 (OF300) ( 254k or 1347k)
116:24:47 Rightward of 6759. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6760-61 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.4 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-46-6761 (OF300) ( 208k or 1050k)
116:24:47 Rightward of 6760. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6762 (OF300) ( 118k or 700k )
116:24:47 Rightward of 6761. Up-Sun view with a portion of Surveyor Crater to the right of the Sun. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6763 (OF300) ( 147k or 826k )
116:24:47 Rightward of 6762. This is the last frame in Pete's 18 frame 4 o'clock pan, with Surveyor crater on the right. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6764 (OF300) ( 197k or 1039k )
116:27:03 First frame is Pete's 8 o'clock pan, with the Sun just out of the picture to the right. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6765 (OF300) ( 125k or 753k )
116:27:03 Rightward of 6764. Note that Pete is standing a few feet down into Surveyor Crater. Note, also, that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6766 (OF300) ( 138k or 796k )
116:27:03 Rightward of 6765. Up-Sun. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6767 (OF300) ( 166k or 891k )
116:27:03 Similar to 6766. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6768 (OF300) ( 156k or 892k )
116:27:03 Rightward of 6767. Surveyor III is in the deep shadow of the inner east wall of Surveyor Crater. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6769 ( 194k or 1193k )
116:27:03 Rightward of 6768. Frame from Pete's 8 o'clock pan showing the deep shadow on the eastern wall of Surveyor Crater and, as indicated in a detail, the sunlit solar panels of Surveyor III. Compare with the corresponding frames from Pete's 12 o'clock pan, AS12-46-6741, and his 4 o'clock pan, AS12-46-6746. Note that Pete mistakenly took these pans at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6770 (OF300) ( 202k or 1220k )
116:27:03 Rightward of 6769. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6771 (OF300) ( 193k or 1179k )
116:27:03 Similar to 6770. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6772 (OF300) ( 193k or 1079k )
116:27:03 Rightward of 6771. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6773 (OF300) ( 153k or 891k )
116:27:03 Similar to 6772, with an f-stop change. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6774 (OF300) ( 157k or 1001k )
116:27:03 Rightward of 6773. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6775 (OF300) ( 115k or 843k )
116:27:03 Rightward of 6774. Down-Sun. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6776 (OF300) ( 140k or 958k )
116:27:03 Rightward of 6775, showing Pete's shadow and the minus-Y (south) footpad and strut. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6777 (OF300) ( 264k or 1314k )
116:27:03 Rightward of 6776, showing the southeast face of the Descent Stage with the doors to the Scientific Equipment (SEQ) Bay doors closed and the plutonium fuel cask in its upright, stowed position. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6778 (OF300) ( 179k or 949k )
116:27:03 Leftward of 6777, showing the plutonium fuel cask. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6779 ( 245k or 1137k )
116:27:03 Rightward of 6778, with overlap of 6777 but none of 6778. Shows Al Bean taking photographs of the plus-Y footpad, possibly AS12-47-6906. The TV camera is at the right-hand side of the picture and the S-Band antenna is visible beyond the plus-Y (north) strut. Note that Pete is standing slightly below the level of the footpads, having moved partway down the intitial slope into Surveyor Crater to take this pan. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6780 ( 223k or 1315k )
116:27:03 Frame from Pete's 8 o'clock pan. Rightward of 6779. A good picture of Al, who is still photographing the plus-Y footpad with the TV camera in the background. Notice the line of footprints that Pete made when he came over from the location of the 4 o'clock pan. This photo gives an impresssion of the way the ground was swept by the engine exhaust. This is particularly evident - perhaps because of lighting - along a line from the engine bell (off-image to the left) through the probe at the left edge to the lower right corner. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6781 (OF300) ( 236k or 1449k )
116:27:03 Rightward of 6780. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6782 (OF300) ( 215k or 1179k )
116:27:03 Rightward of 6781. View to the northeast. Last frame in Pete's 8 o'clock pan. Note that Pete mistakenly took the pan at 15-foot focus rather than 74-foot focus.
AS12-46-6783 (OF300) ( 209k or 925k )
116:34:14 Down-Sun photograph of Al, who has just removed the RTG package from the SEQ Bay. We can see the "saddlebag" he is wearing at his left hip. The saddlebag material resembles the Teflon cloth used for the Sample Collection Bags (SCBs) used on Apollos 15, 16 and 17. Note that the transmitted light in the shadow of the saddlebag has a reddish-brown color. We can see the boom on which the RTG package rode as it was pulled out of the SEQ bay. We can also see the pulleys that were operated with the tapes. The SEQ bay door that covered the right-hand 2/3rds is folded up out of the way. At the left side of the bay, we can see the vertically hinged portion of the door pulled back out of the way. Note that the SEQ bay is not an integral part of the LM structure but, rather, hangs on the outside. Below the SEQ bay, we can see a shield which protects the landing radar (mounted on the bottom of the Descent Stage) from heat radiating from the engine bell. On the package, the RTG, with its distinctive, grey radiator fins is nearest the ground while the folded, silver frame of the HTC is above it, nearest to Al's right hand.
AS12-46-6784 (OF300) ( 165k or 946k )
116:34:14 Down-Sun photograph of ALSEP package No. 1, which Pete removed from the SEQ Bay at 116:33:36.
AS12-46-6785 (OF300) ( 203k or 964k )
116:34:14 Al has placed the RTG package on the ground. Note the cooling fins on the RTG. Note the pull rings on the edge closest to Al. These pull rings are used to release "pip pins" with which some pieces of equipment are attached to the RTG pallet. The light-colored piece of gear that is attached to the part of the RTG pallet that is on top in this picture is the SIDE (Suprathermal Ion Detection Experiment). Note the deployment rail and pulleys extending out from the SEQ bay above the upper ends of the lanyards. The distinctive ring-shaped top of the fuel cask can be seen behind the left-hand SEQ bay door. The landing radar is under the SEQ Bay, directly beneath the partition separating the two ALSEP compartments. The shield that protects the radar from descent engine exhaust is farther to the right. Note the saddlebag on Al's left hip and note, also, that Pete's shadow shows that he is wearing one too.
AS12-46-6786 (OF300) ( 164k or 855k )
116:40:44 Al Bean lowers the cask that holds the plutonium fuel element used to power the RTG. During the flight from Earth, the cask is positioned vertically against the side of the LM. Here, Bean is using a lanyard to rotate the cask down into a horizontal position so that he can use a special tool to remove the dome top and extract the fuel element. The landing radar is under the SEQ Bay beyond the RTG and the radar shield is farther back. Note that Pete and Al have closed the SEQ Bay doors to prevent the cavity from heating and putting a thermal load on the LM interior.
AS12-46-6787 (OF300) ( 256k or 1273k )
116:42:40 Al Bean removes the protective dome from the RTG fuel cask. The landing radar and the shield that protects the radar from the engine exhaust are visible beyond the RTG. Note the fuel-element extraction tool sticking out of the HTC sample bag. Compare with AS12-46-6789 below.
AS12-46-6788 (OF300) ( 251k or 1142k )
116:43:02 Al Bean has removed the protective dome from the RTG fuel cask and is placing it out of the way to his left. The landing radar and the shield that protects the radar from the engine exhaust are visible beyond the RTG. Note the fuel-element extraction tool sticking out of the HTC sample bag. Compare with AS12-46-6790 below.
AS12-46-6789 (OF300) ( 186k or 935k )
116:43:38 Al is fitting the fuel-element exraction tool onto the fuel element. The HTC is behind him on the left and the landing radar and radar shield are on the bottom of the LM to the right.
AS12-46-6790 (OF300) ( 191k or 851k )
116:43:38 Al is trying to remove the RTG fuel element from the cask.
AS12-46-6791 (OF300) ( 261k or 1231k )
116:50:59 Al attaches the RTG package to the carrybar which will later serve as the Central Station antenna mast. As can be seen in a detail, he has inserted the end of the carry bar into a slightly larger round opening in the lock on what will be the bottom of Package 2 - to his right - and will then pull up on the carry bar to seat it in the close-fitting upper hole. With the center-of-mass of the pallet below the upper hole, gravity will help keep the package secure on the carrybar. He has already secured the carry bar to Package 1, which is on Al's left and, as indicated in the detail, holds the Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE), the Solar Wind Spectrometer (SWS), and the Lunar Surface Magnetometer (LSM).
AS12-46-6792 (OF300) ( 255k or 1229k )
116:50:59 Similar to 6791, showing Al attaching the RTG package to the carrybar.
AS12-46-6793 (OF300) ( 111k or 770k )
116:55:53 Pete took this down-Sun of the larger of the two mounds near the ALSEP deployment site. Pete's shadow shows us that he is using a UHT to carry the SIDE subpallet.
AS12-46-6794 (OF300) ( 192k or 1190k )
116:55:53. As Pete got closer to the larger mound, he took a stereopair, starting with this frame.
AS12-46-6795 (OF300) ( 227k or 1323k )
116:55:53. Pete stepped to his right to get this stereo-companion to 6794.
AS12-46-6796 (OF300) ( 170k or 1103k )
116:57:52 Pete starts a 16-frame pan near the ALSEP deployment site. This first frame shows the view a little to the left of down-Sun. We can see the shadow of the UHT sticking up out of the SIDE subpallet.
AS12-46-6797 (OF300) ( 136k or 919k )
116:57:52 Rightward of 6796. Down-Sun.
AS12-46-6798 (OF300) ( 187k or 1170k )
116:57:52 Rightward of 6797.
AS12-46-6799 (OF300) ( 216k or 1337k )
116:57:52 Rightward of 6798.
AS12-46-6800 (OF300) ( 238k or 1398k )
116:57:52 Rightward of 6799. View to the north.
AS12-46-6801 (OF300) ( 265k or 1547k )
116:57:52 Rightward of 6800.
AS12-46-6802 (OF300) ( 234k or 1392k )
116:57:52 Rightward of 6801.
AS12-46-6803 (OF300) ( 230k or 1409k )
116:57:52 Rightward of 6802.
AS12-46-6804 (OF300) ( 123k or 762k )
116:57:52 Rightward of 6803, with the Sun on the righthand side.
AS12-46-6805 (OF300) ( 108k or 672k )
116:57:52 Rightward of 6804. Up-Sun.
AS12-46-6806 (OF300) ( 163k or 891k )
116:57:52 Rightward of 6805. Al is carrying the ALSEP package out from the LM. As can be seen in a detail, he is walking flat-footed, in part because the mass of the ALSEP packages is nearly the same as the his own mass, including the suit and backpack; and, in part, because the carrybar is flexing and would be difficult to control if he tried to use a loping stride. Note that he is holding the carrybar in his hands, with his arms hanging down in front of him. Other LMPs discovered that it was easier to carry and control the packages by holding their arms up in front of them and getting the carrybar in the elbow crooks. Note the flag and the S-Band antenna to the left of the LM.
AS12-46-6807 (OF300) ( 229k or 1317k )
116:57:52 Rightward of 6806. Al carrying the ALSEP package out from the LM.
AS12-46-6808 (OF300) ( 206k or 1257k )
116:57:52 Rightward of 6807, with Al's shadow in the foreground.
AS12-46-6809 (OF300) ( 191k or 1168k )
116:57:52 Rightward of 6808. Frame from Pete's pre-deployment ALSEP pan. View to the south with Al's shadow at the bottom. A portion of the large mound is on the right edge.
AS12-46-6810 (OF300) ( 228k or 1229k )
116:57:52 Rightward of 6809. Frame from Pete's pre-deployment ALSEP pan centered on the large mound SSW of Pete's current location.
AS12-46-6811 (OF300) ( 195k or 1096k )
116:57:52 Rightward of 6810. Last frame in Pete's pre-deployment ALSEP pan. View to the southwest.
AS12-46-6812 (OF300) ( 216k or 994k )
117:18:46 Solar Wind Spectrometer.
AS12-46-6813 (OF300) ( 246k or 1424k )
117:35:14 Al has deployed the three-arm Lunar Surface Magnetometer (LSM). The LM is in the background at the left edge of the picture. Good view of the saddlebag on Al's left hip. Because Pete landed so close to Surveyor crater, the LM footpads are below their current position and are hidden by a very slight, intervening rise.

Note the foggy blue patch around Al. Examination of successive frames indicate that this feature is related to the camera lens, very likely a dust smudge. Kipp Teague notes "The lens aberration begins at as12-46-6813. It's a blue glow around the astronaut in 6818, again in 6826, a discoloration in other frames, affecting clarity in most, and it's not gone again until 6853 (back in the LM). Whatever the phenomenon is, it has a varying impact on color based on the brightness of the central object in the image. On bright subjects, the aberration adds a blue cast, and on darker subjects, the aberration adds a reddish cast." I note that it also seems to vary with sun angle.

AS12-46-6814 (OF300) ( 191k or 957k )
117:43:45 This picture, taken across the top of the Central Station toward the magnetometer, shows the Central Station antenna. Note the attachment hardware that held the various experiment packages prior to deployment. A detail shows two Boyd bolt sleeves on the near edge and an empty hole where another one popped out after being released. The Solar Wind Spectrometer is at the center right edge of the picture.
AS12-46-6815 (OF300) ( 155k or 843k )
117:43:45 Pete has stepped to his left to take a different view of the Central Station antenna. A detail shows the male portion of a Boyd bolt and its sleeve lying on the top of the Central Station
AS12-46-6816 (OF300) ( 156k or 877k )
117:43:45 Similar to 6815.
AS12-46-6817 (OF300) ( 240k or 1285k )
117:43:45 Pete has moved away from the Central Station to take a longer view from the north. The Solar Wind Spectrometer is to the right of the Central Station, the Passive Seismic Experiment is to the left, and the Lunar Surface Magnetometer is in the background beyond and just to the left of the Central Station.
AS12-46-6818 (OF300) ( 186k or 1086k )
117:49:44 Pete is next to the RTG, which can be seen at the lower left, when he takes this picture to the southwest of Al deploying the SIDE/CCIG. Pete took the picture at some point before going over to help Al.
AS12-46-6819 (OF300) ( 98k or 619k )
117:55:54 Documentation of the Central Station and nearby equipment from roughly 25 meters southwest. Most details are lost in the glare of the Sun. The various piece of equipment can be identified in a comparison between a level-adjusted detail from 6819 and a detail from 6821 ( 282k ). The PSE cover can be seen in place on the ALSEP package in a detail from 6791.
AS12-46-6820 (OF300) ( 243k or 1229k )
117:56:56 Showing Al taking a close-up of the top of the SIDE. The CCIG is to the left of the SIDE while the ribbon cable connecting the SIDE to the Central Station runs out of the field-of-view to the right. The blue 'fog' is do to a dust smudge which first shows up on 6813. The crater at the lower right is large enough and deep enough to show up on LROC images (0.2 Mb) taken at high solar elevations high enough to show tracks left by the astronauts. The crater is labeled 'a' in the LROC images. Pete would have taken 6820 while standing just below the 'a'.
AS12-46-6821 (OF300) ( 311k or 1724k )
117:56:56 Pete's 'locator' to the Central Station from the SIDE/CCIG site. Note the blue-tinged area at center due to the dust smudge. As indicated in a comparison between a level-adjusted detail from 6819 and a detail from 6821 ( 282k ), the objects around the Central Station are (left to right) the RTG, Central Station, PSE cover, PSE, and SWS.
AS12-46-6822 (OF300) ( 236k or 1247k )
118:00:46 Pete took this photograph from just south of the small mound which, as can be seen in Al's magnetometer documentation photo AS12-47-6921, is north of the Central Station.
AS12-46-6823 (OF300) ( 208k or 1134k )
118:00:46 Stereo companion to 6822.
AS12-46-6824 (OF300) ( 282k or 1304k )
118:00:46 Pete has moved in to get a closer view of the small mound. The large rock appears to have hit the east side of the mound sometime after it was formed. As Pete mentions to Houston, the rock appears to have been a piece of ejecta from an impact somewhere in the area. It hit at relatively low velocity and did no more damage than dig a shallow crater at the base of the mound.
AS12-46-6825 (OF300) ( 264k or 1224k)
118:00:46 Stereo companion to 6824.
AS12-46-6826 (OF300) ( 241k or 1391k)
118:00:46 Pete has turned toward the Central Station to get a "locator" to show the location of the small mound. Al seems to be adjusting the PSE thermal skirt. The blue glow around Al is due to a dust smudge on the center of the lens, which first appears in 6813.
AS12-46-6827 (OF300) ( 277k or 1531k)
118:06:36 Pete takes a view to the south of the large mound with Head Crater in the background. The mound can be seen in the distance to the south of the Central Station in a labeled version of Al's photo AS12-47-6926 (172k).
AS12-46-6828 (OF300) ( 304k or 1589k)
118:06:36 Stereo companion to 6827.
AS12-46-6829 (OF300) ( 280k or 1547k)
118:06:36 View to the south with the shadow of the large mound coming into the image from the left. As indicated in a labeled version by Thomas Schwagmeier, Head Crater is in the near distance and Bench Crater is just below the local horizon a bit farther left but out-of-focus. See, also, a labeled version of the traverse map drawn on LROC image M168353795R. From a point just north of the large mound, Bench Crater subtends about 12 degrees and Head Crater about 78 degrees. The Hasselblad field-of-view is about 46 degrees.
AS12-46-6830 (OF300) ( 298k or 1524k)
118:06:36 Pete move farther to his right to take this view to the south.
AS12-46-6831 (OF300) ( 231k or 1268k)
118:09:17 Pete has moved closer to the large mound and takes this picture across the top of it toward the NNW with the SIDE/CCIG at the right. See also AS12-47-6933.
AS12-46-6832 (OF300) ( 245k or 1240k)
118:09:17 Pete has stepped to his right to take a second view across the top of the large mound. The SIDE/CCIG is in the distance on the right. The center of the image is blurred and discolored by a dust smudge that first appeared on 6813.
AS12-46-6833 (OF300) ( 306k or 1603k)
118:10:36 View to the south of the surface, possibly near the large mound.
AS12-46-6834 (OF300) ( 305k or 1473k)
118:15:19 Compare the rocks in this photograph with the rocks near Pete's feet in Al's photo AS12-47-6938.
AS12-46-6835 (OF300) ( 344k or 1699k)
118:16:12 Somewhere in this picture may be Pete's "brilliant, spanking fresh impact crater".
AS12-46-6836 (OF300) ( 207k or 1354k )
118:18:09 Pete's first pan of Middle Crescent Crater starts with this view of the northeast rim. Pete will take the pan around to the left and will only take enough pictures to cover the crater around to the southeast rim. Note the deep shadow on the eastern wall. The red-brown color patch at the center of the image is due to the dust smudge on the lens that was first apparent in 6813.
AS12-46-6837 (OF300) ( 188k or 1175k )
118:18:09 Leftward of 6836. The red-brown color patch at the center of the image is due to the dust smudge on the lens that was first apparent in 6813.
AS12-46-6838 (OF300) ( 186k or 1114k )
118:18:09 Leftward of 6837. With a lighter background, the discoloration due to the dust smudge is now a faint blue.
AS12-46-6838/9 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 2861k or 242k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-46-6839 (OF300) ( 188k or 1100k )
118:18:09 Leftward of 6838. Note the cluster of blocks in the foreground, which appears to be bedrock thrown out of a fresh crater immediately down-Sun of Pete and Al. See 6841, below.
AS12-46-6839/40 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.0Mb or 256k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-46-6840 (OF300) ( 179k or 1038k )
118:18:09 Leftward of 6839. Al's shadow is on the left.
AS12-46-6841 ( 136k or 902k )
118:18:09 Leftward of 6840, showing the two shadows extended partway down the east wall. Pete, who is taking this partial pan, is on the left and Al is on the right. The crater immediately down-Sun of Pete and Al appears to have dug up blocks of local bedrock.
AS12-46-6842 (OF300) ( 156k or 987k )
118:18:09 Leftward of 6841. Down-Sun with Al's shadow to the right of Pete's.
AS12-46-6843 (OF300) ( 165k or 1071k )
118:18:09 Leftward of 6842. Down-Sun with Al's shadow to the right of Pete's.
AS12-46-6844 (OF300) ( 165k or 1071k )
118:18:09 Leftward of 6843. This is the last frame in Pete's right-to-left partial pan of Middle Crescent Crater.
AS12-46-6845 (OF300) ( 200k or 1157k )
118:18:41 Pete has moved to his left several feet and starts a clockwise, left-to-right partial pan back around to the northeast rim to give a stereo view of Middle Crescent Crater. The discoloration at the center of the image is due to a dust smudge on the lens that showed up first on 6813.
AS12-46-6846 (OF300) ( 162k or 1059k )
118:18:41 Rightward of 6845.
AS12-46-6847 (OF300) ( 152k or 1001k )
118:18:41 Rightward of 6846. Down-Sun. Al's shadow is on the right.
AS12-46-6847/8 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 644k or 185k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-46-6848 (OF300) ( 153k or 980k )
118:18:41 Rightward of 6847.
AS12-46-6848/9 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 736k or 214k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-46-6849 (OF300) ( 157k or 979k )
118:18:41 Rightward of 6848.
AS12-46-6849/50 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 780k or 244k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-46-6850 (OF300) ( 172k or 1068k )
118:18:41 Rightward of 6849.
AS12-46-6850/1 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 800k or 216k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-46-6851 (OF300) ( 168k or 1047k )
118:18:41 Rightward of 6850. This frame from Pete's second Middle Crescent partial pan shows the deeply shadowed the east wall. Note the relatively large number of boulders in the foreground and on the rim beyond the shadow. Pete took his first pan from a few feet east of the crater on the right edge of the image.
AS12-46-6851/2 Red-Blue Anaglyph( 695 or 196k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-46-6852 (OF300) ( 183k or 1152k )
118:18:41 Rightward of 6851. Last frame in Pete's left-to-right partial Pan of Middle Crescent Crater. The red-brown discoloration at the center of the image is due to a dust smudge that first showed up on 6813.
AS12-46-6853 (OF300) ( 118k or 1067k )
120:10:34 Post-EVA-1 photo from Pete's window, probably taken to use up the remaining film on the magazine before installing a new one. This photo shows the view that is as far right as can be seen out of Pete's window. Note that the LM shadow is fully on Pete's side of the spacecraft, a consequence of the LM's ten degree right yaw. The LPD scales on etched on Pete's window are out-of-focus in the foreground. Note that the dust smudge that was evident in images 6813 to 6852 seems to be gone. Pete has probably cleaned the lens.
AS12-46-6854 (OF300) ( 122k or 1039k )
120:10:34 Leftward of 6853. Down-Sun post-EVA-1 photo from Pete's window.
AS12-46-6855 (OF300) ( 150k or 1100k )
120:10:34 Leftward of 6854. Down-Sun post-EVA-1 photo from Pete's window. A labeled detail ( 237k ) shows Head, Bench, and the large crater 4.5 km to the west they discussed after the landing.
AS12-46-6856 (OF300) ( 117k or 888k )
120:10:34 View out the righhand side of Pete's window of the near surface.
AS12-46-6857 (OF300) ( 130k or 948k )
120:10:34 View of the LM shadow and surrounding near surface.
AS12-46-6858 (OF300) ( 196k or 1176k )
120:10:34 View of the near surface and the thrusters out the lefthand side of Pete's window.
AS12-46-6859 (OF300) ( 200k or 1235k )
120:10:34 Similar to 6858 but a bit more to the left.
AS12-46-6860 (OF300) ( 123k or 968k )
120:10:34 View of the horizon at the righthand edge of Pete's window. A blown-up detail from the left side of the image shows the SIDE. See, also, a labeled detail ( 170k ) from 6862.
AS12-46-6861 (OF300) ( 211k or 1426k )
120:10:34 View of a thruster, the S-Band antenna, U.S flag, and Solar Wind Collector out the righthand side of Al's window.
AS12-46-6861/5 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1142k or 196k )
Red-blue anaglyph combining 6861 and 6865 by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-46-6862 (OF300) ( 194k or 1249k )
120:10:34 Leftward of 6861. View toward the ALSEP. See a labeled detail ( 170k ).
AS12-46-6863 (OF300) ( 171k or 1205k )
120:10:34 Leftward of 6862. View toward the ALSEP. See a labeled detail ( 183k ).
AS12-46-6863/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 879k or 204k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-46-6864 (OF300) ( 173k or 1168k )
120:10:34 Similar to 6863. Al probably moved closer to the window and/or to his right to get more of the view to the left.
AS12-46-6865 (OF300) ( 264k or 1594k )
120:10:34 View over the thrusters to the left of Al's window plus the U.S. flag and the Solar Wind Collector (SWC).
AS12-46-6865/6 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1286k or 292k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-46-6866 (OF300) ( 309k or 1661k )
120:10:34 Leftward of 6865 with the flag and SWC at Center and part of the ALSEP array on the left.
AS12-46-6867 (OF300) ( 288k or 1431k )
120:10:34 Leftward of 6866 with the ALSEP above center.
AS12-46-6868 (OF300) ( 269k or 1410k )
120:10:34 Similar to 6867. Last frame on the magazine.

Magazine 47/V (Color) Frames 6869-7021

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

The first 21 frames were taken from lunar orbit prior to the landing. The remainder was used by Al Bean during EVA-1.


AS12-47-6869 (OF300) ( 126k or 1129k )
Tsiolkovsky crater on lunar horizon from orbit. Note that Al Bean entered the LM just before Rev 11 AOS and, at 103:53:35, told Houston, "I'm down in the LM now. Everything is shipshape. Just pulled back the window shades, and both of the windows are well frosted over. Guess we'll turn on the heaters when we power up in about 4 or 5 minutes." Consequently, 6869 was taken no earlier than Rev 12 and, because 6875 was taken during the Rev 12 Nearside pass, 6869 was necessarily taken not long before Rev 12 AOS.
AS12-47-6869/70 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 529k or 150k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6870 (OF300) ( 92k or 579k )
Tsiolkovsky crater on lunar horizon from orbit.
AS12-47-6871 (OF300) ( 84k or 557k )
Crescent Earth from lunar orbit. Probably taken not long after Rev 12 AOS. The western portion of Pasteur Crater (seen also in a Lunar Orbiter 2 image) is in the foreground.

Journal Contributor Paul White has made detailed comparisons of cloud patterns seen in a large number of Apollo images with imagery taken at close to the same time by various meteorlogical satellites.

AS12-47-6872 (OF300) ( 85k or 543k )
Crescent Earth from lunar orbit.
AS12-47-6873 (OF300) ( 70k or 456k )
Crescent Earth from lunar orbit.
AS12-47-6874 (OF300) ( 74k or 517k )
Crescent Earth from lunar orbit.
AS12-47-6875 (OF300) ( 199k or 1206k )
Copernicus Crater from lunar orbit. Probably taken at about 106:32:02, during the Rev 12 Nearside pass, when Pete tells Houston, "Boy, oh boy, Houston. Do we have a fantastic view of Copernicus."
AS12-47-6875/6 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3049k or 233k )
Red-blue anaglyph combining 6875 and 6876 by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6876 (OF300) ( 211k or 1298k )
Copernicus Crater from lunar orbit.
AS12-47-6877 (OF300) ( 71k or 768k )
Command Module from the LM after separation, which happened at 107:54:02, not long after Rev 13 AOS.
AS12-47-6878 (OF300) ( 83k or 932k )
A view similar to 6877.
AS12-47-6879 (OF300) ( 102k or 728k )
Earthrise on Rev 14. The Pete and Al will land on this orbit. The distinctive crater in the foreground is Meitner, which has a diameter of 87 km. Journal Contributor Henri Partanen notes that the photos in this sequence are very similar to an Apollo 14 earthrise series that starts with AS14-66-9224. Those photos were also taken at AOS just prior to descent initiation. Because the Apollo 12 and 14 landing sites are both equatorial and are only separated by about 10 degrees of longitude, the orbital planes are similar. A comparison of Celestia images of the Moon as viewed from Earth at the time of the two landings shows that the Moon was in similar libration states. See, also, a labeled version ( 2.7 Mb ) by RenéCantin .

The entire series of Earthrist photos is 6879 to 6895. Journal Contributor GoneToPlaid has created an 8-minute animation (136 Mb) presenting the images and using Celestia to determine the approximate longitude/latitude/altitude from which each frame was taken. The animation is also avialable on YouTube.

AS12-47-6880 (OF300) ( 101k or 714k )
View slightly later than 6879.
AS12-47-6881 (OF300) ( 100k or 722k )
View slightly later than 6880.
AS12-47-6882 (OF300) ( 85k or 535k )
View slightly later than 6881.
AS12-47-6883 (OF300) ( 83k or 522k )
View slightly later than 6882.
AS12-47-6884 (OF300) ( 82k or 513k )
The same.
AS12-47-6885 (OF300) ( 82k or 513k )
The same.
AS12-47-6886 (OF300) ( 89k or 692k )
Earthrise.
AS12-47-6887 (OF300) ( 92k or 680k )
Earthrise.
AS12-47-6888 (OF300) ( 83k or 693k )
Earthrise.
AS12-47-6889 (OF300) ( 83k or 719k )
Earthrise.
AS12-47-6890 (OF300) ( 79k or 514k )
Earthrise.
AS12-47-6891 (OF300) ( 75k or 487k )
Earthrise.
AS12-47-6892 (OF300) ( 72k or 469k )
Earthrise.
AS12-47-6893 (OF300) ( 73k or 556k )
Earthrise.
AS12-47-6894 (OF300) ( 71k or 546k )
Earthrise.
AS12-47-6895 (OF300) ( 74k or 588k )
Earthrise.

The remaining frames were taken by Al Bean during EVA-1.


AS12-47-6896 (OF300) ( 126k or 655k )
116:20:22 Down-Sun photo of Pete at the flag. Note that Pete is not wearing a camera on his RCU bracket. He put it on the MESA while he was deploying the S-Band antenna. We can see the S-Band shadow at the left center.
AS12-47-6897 (OF300) ( 168k or 858k )
116:20:22 Al took this picture of Pete early in the first EVA, shortly after they deployed the U.S. flag. Note the length of Pete's shadow. The shadow of the LM enters the picture from the middle of the left edge. Pete is grasping the flag because the locking hinge that was supposed to hold the crossbar and flag out from the staff would not latch.
AS12-47-6898 (OF300) ( 135k or 661k )
116:22:29 Close-up of the sunward side of the Solar Wind Collector (SWC).
AS12-47-6899 (OF300) ( 167k or 824k )
116:12:30 View toward the LM from just beyond the Solar Wind Collector (SWC) . Note the pointing of the S-Band antenna. Pete is at the right side of the image. He is taking a pan and, in that pan, takes a picture of Al which is AS12-46-6736. Surveyor Crater is visible beyond the LM.
AS12-47-6900 (OF300) ( 211k or 929k )
116:25:56 Al is doing an inspection of the LM, taking photographs of the footpads and struts to give the engineers back in Houston some information about the response of the landing gear to the touchdown. This first picture in the series shows the minus-Y (south) footpad and strut. We can see the bent probe, which may have been responsible for most of the surface disruption that we can see around this footpad.
AS12-47-6901 (OF300) ( 183k or 854k )
In this second photograph of the minus-Y footpad, behind it we can see the area under the engine bell.
AS12-47-6902 (OF300) ( 127k or 787k )
116:26:34 As Al told Houston to expect, much of the detail of the plus-Z footpad is lost in the LM shadow.
AS12-47-6903 (OF300) ( 129k or 586k )
Similar to 6902.
AS12-47-6904 (OF300) ( 272k or 1184k )
116:27:54 In this photo of the plus-Y footpad, we can see indication of spacecraft motion toward the south. As evidenced by photo AS12-47-6907, the footpad first made contact southeast of its present location and then "bounced" northwestward. The soil disturbance in this photo suggests that there was a little southward motion during the final contact. The object on the footpad is probably a piece of discarded packing material. The contrast chart in out-of-focus in the background, hanging from the MESA.
AS12-47-6905 (OF300) ( 274k or 1211k)
Similar to 6904.
AS12-47-6906 (OF300) ( 271k or 1219k)
In this third photo of the area of the plus-Y footpad, we can see in under the engine bell. This photo was cited in the AS12-46-6779 caption.
AS12-47-6907 (OF300) ( 245k or 1120k )
116:28:11 This photo shows the plume-swept ground under the Descent Engine bell. The structure above and to the left of the bell is a shield which protected the landing radar, which is mounted on the bottom of the Descent Stage, from heat radiation during the landing. The tube-like object rising up from the ground in the foreground is one of the 3-meter-long probes that gave the crew a contact indication just prior to touchdown. The probe was bent in the final descent and created the groove that runs from the bottom center to center right. The circular depression just beyond the probe groove is the first imprint made by the plus-Y footpad. As Al suggests to Houston, the plus-Y pad was probably the first to make contact with the surface but then "bounced" northwestward to its final location.
AS12-47-6908 (OF300) ( 250k or 1193k)
116:29:48 In this photo of the minus-Z (east) footpad, we get a good view of the clean-swept area under the engine bell.
AS12-47-6909 (OF300) ( 241k or 1074k)
Down-Sun photo of the minus-Z footpad. The disruption of the surface may have been caused more by the probe than by the footpad. Notice the rock sitting almost under the engine bell.
AS12-47-6910 (OF300) ( 279k or 1317k)
Al took this picture of the area under the engine bell from just south of the minus-Z footpad.
AS12-47-6910/1 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3559k or 358k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6911 (OF300) ( 265k or 1268k )
Similar to 6910. Notice that there are some small craters that have not been completely obliterated by the plume.
AS12-47-6912 (OF300) ( 94k or 524k )
116:29:48 Similar to 6913, which is the better of the pair.
AS12-47-6912/3 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 713k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erik van Meijgaarden.
AS12-47-6913 (OF300) ( 106k or 552k )
116:33:36 Pete is using a lanyard to pull the ALSEP packages out of the SEQ Bay on a rail. Note his chest-mounted camera, the OPS antenna behind his head, his cuff checklist and the pocket mounted on his left thigh to hold the contingency sample.
AS12-47-6914 (OF300) ( 98k or 507k )
116:33:36 Pete is using a lanyard to pull the ALSEP packages out of the SEQ Bay on a rail. Note his chest-mounted camera, the OPS antenna behind his head, his cuff checklist and the pocket mounted on his left thigh to hold the contingency sample.
AS12-47-6915 (OF300) ( 151k or 772k )
View of the minus-Z (east) footpad. Note that the SEQ Bay doors are closed and that the focal point is much closer than the footpad. The picture was taken sometime after 116:34:14 when Pete took AS12-46-6785, which is the last picture showing the doors open.
AS12-47-6916 (OF300) ( 311k or 1708k )
117:30:24 Cross-Sun to the south of the Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE), which is surrounded by its thermal skirt. The skirt protects the ground underneath the instrument from temperature swings as the Sun moves across the lunar sky. The blue coloration at the top right is undoubtedly an artifact.
AS12-47-6917 (OF300) ( 255k or 1119k )
Down-Sun of the PSE, with the Central Station in the background.
AS12-47-6918 (OF300) ( 164k or 835k )
117:30:24 Al has backed up to take a longer distance "down-Sun" of the PSE. The Central Station is in the background. Note that the SIDE is sitting to the left of the Central Station, waiting to be deployed. The RTG is partly visible beyond the Central Station on the right. Pete's shadow is on the left edge of the image.
AS12-47-6919 (OF300) ( 124k or 672k )
117:33:06 Down-Sun picture showing Pete with the carrybar/antenna mast in his left hand and a Universal Handling Tool (UHT) which he is using to release the Central Station antenna gimbal assembly. The object in the foreground is the magnetometer, which Al will unfold when he deploys it. Note that Pete has laid his tongs down on the pallet. After he and Al finish the ALSEP deployment, Pete will use the tongs to collect rocks.
AS12-47-6920 (OF300) ( 255k or 1337k )
117:40:50 Cross-Sun of the magnetometer after deployment. The Central Station is left of center at the top, with the Passive Seismic Experiment farther to the right.
AS12-47-6921 (OF300) ( 265k or 1614k )
117:40:50 Al took this documentation photo to show the location of the deployed magnetometer, which is the instrument in the foreground. Pete is in the background at the Central Station, installing the antenna. The Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment (SIDE), ready for deployment, is to the left of the Central Station. The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) is partly hidden by the SIDE. The subpallet, which Pete carried out from the LM, is on the left. See a labeled detail ( 246k. The smaller of the two mounds is visible beyond and slightly to the right of Pete. Pete's picture AS12-46-6822 is a close-up of the small mound.
AS12-47-6922 (OF300) ( 340k or 2334k )
117:56:42 Close-up of the SIDE/CCIG. Note the spider-web ground screen on the legs. See also AS12-46-6820. Note that the blue coloration at the top right is undoubtedly an artifact.
AS12-47-6922/3 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 3849k or 480k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6923 (OF300) ( 339k or 2381k )
117:56:42 This photo is a close-up of the CCIG in its final configuration. See also AS12-46-6820.
AS12-47-6924 (OF300) ( 264k or 1988k )
117:56:53 This photo shows the top of the SIDE in order to document the alignment and leveling. The level bubble is visible in the central circular feature on the left.
AS12-47-6925 (OF300) ( 183k or 1206k )
118:04:01 This photo shows the Central Station antenna and gimbal assembly. The larger of the two mounds is in the distance.
AS12-47-6926 (OF300) ( 225k or 1295k )
This photo shows the top of the Central Station from the north. Note the large regolith mound in the background. On the top of the Central Station, we can see the attachment points of the various experiment packages. Note, also, the pointing adjustment wheel on the antenna gimbal assembly. The Solar Wind spectrometer is on the ground beyond the Central Station. This photo was cited in the AS12-46-6827 caption. Also see comments at 117:38:17.
AS12-47-6927 (OF300) ( 170k or 790k )
118:04:01 View across the top of the Central Station toward the SIDE/CCIG.
AS12-47-6928 (OF300) ( 286k or 2504k )
Northwest corner of the Central Station with the LM and the S-Band antenna in the background. The PSE is to the right of the Central Station and the magnetometer is to the left of the Central Station antenna.
AS12-47-6929 (OF300) ( 292k or 1849k )
Central Station antenna and gimbals, with the Solar Wind Spectrometer and the large mound in the background.
AS12-47-6930 (OF300) ( 171k or 839k )
View toward the SIDE/CCIG.
AS12-47-6931 (OF300) ( 300k or 2255k )
118:06:33 Al's last ALSEP photo shows the PSE in the foreground and the magnetometer in the background.
AS12-47-6932 (OF300) ( 273k or 1243k )
118:08:16 Al took this cross-Sun "before" photo of an area from which Pete is about to collect a sample with his tongs. The astronauts are near the ALSEP site, having just finished the ALSEP deployment. The opening of the tongs proved to be too small for practical use and later crews carried a design with a larger opening. Note how the texture of the pristine surface is exaggerated by the low Sun angle. On the left side of the picture, just below Pete's right foot, we can see a spray of dust he created when he moved his foot to its present location.
AS12-47-6933 (OF300) ( 239k or 1175k)
118:09:17 Al took this close-up photo of the large mound from the northeast. It is a companion to Pete's picture AS12-46-6831.
AS12-47-6934 (OF300) ( 224k or 1105k)
Close-up of the top of the large mound.
AS12-47-6935 (OF300) ( 208k or 1037k)
Close-up of the top of the large mound.
AS12-47-6936 (OF300) ( 342k or 1689k)
118:14:46 Al is probably trying to show the linear patterns in the soil that he describes to Houston.
AS12-47-6937 (OF300) ( 352k or 1890k)
Similar to 6936.
AS12-47-6938 (OF300) ( 289k or 1295k)
118:15:19 On their way to Middle Crescent Crater, Al stopped to examine this secondary crater. Al's photo shows Pete beyond the secondary crater, facing away from Al and possibly taking AS12-46-6834 which seems to show the same set of rocks.
AS12-47-6939 (OF300) ( 280k or 1342k)
118:16:25 Al's "before" of the sample area.
AS12-47-6940 (OF300) ( 314k or 1535k)
118:23:38 Al's "before" of the sample area.
AS12-47-6941 (OF300) ( 114k or 979k )
118:28:21 Down-Sun. Al is retaking the LM area pans that Pete had taken at the start of the EVA. Pete took his pans at a 15-foot focus and Al is retaking them at 74-feet. This first of three excellent pans is taken just north of the LM shadow.
AS12-47-6942 (OF300) ( 82k or 812k )
Leftward of 6941.
AS12-47-6942-43 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.4 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6943 (OF300) ( 70k or 515k )
Leftward of 6942. Note the two large rocks just beyond the LM shadow.
AS12-47-6943-44 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.6 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6943/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 874k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6944 (OF300) ( 120k or 995k )
Leftward of 6943.
AS12-47-6944-45 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6945 (OF300) ( 1.2 Mb )
Leftward of 6944. We are beginning to see into Surveyor Crater.
AS12-47-6945-46 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.9 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6945/6 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 590k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6946 (OF300) ( 167k or 1261k )
Leftward of 6945.
AS12-47-6946-47 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.0 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6946/7 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 611k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6947 (OF300) ( 140k or 985k )
Leftward of 6946. Note the small crater that has dug up a considerable amount of debris. We are beginning to see the southern edge of shadow on the eastern wall of Surveyor Crater.
AS12-47-6947-48 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.0 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6947/8 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 560k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6948 (OF300) ( 118k or 929k )
Leftward of 6947. The appearance of Surveyor III and the Surveyor Crater shadow has not changed noticeably in the three hours since Pete took his pans. The HTC is at the left edge of the photograph.
AS12-47-6948-49 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.9 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6949 (OF300) ( 89k or 650k )
118:28:21 This frame from Al's 12 o'clock pan is centered on Surveyor III ( see a detail ). The HTC is near the minus-Y (south) strut. Because Al took this pan at 74-foot focus, more detail is visible than in the corresponding frames Pete mistakenly took at 15-foot focus early in the EVA: 6741, 6746, and 6769. Note, also, that Surveyor III is a bit better illuminated at the end of the EVA. In the two hours since Pete took his pans, the Sun has risen about 1 degree.
AS12-47-6950 (OF300) ( 62k or 417k )
118:28:21 Up-Sun frame from Al's 12 o'clock pan. In the glare of the Sun, we can see Pete at the MESA. The HTC is at the right.
AS12-47-6951 (OF300) ( 69k or 425k )
Up-Sun showing Pete's legs and the S-Band antenna.
AS12-47-6952 (OF300) ( 92k or 517k )
Leftward of 6951, showing the S-Band antenna and cover.
AS12-47-6952-53 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.0 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6953 (OF300) ( 139k or 814k )
Leftward of 6952, S-Band antenna cover and loops in the TV cable.
AS12-47-6953-54 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.4 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6953/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 718k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6954 (OF300) ( 176k or 1157k )
Leftward of 6953, centered on the U.S. flag.
AS12-47-6954-55 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.3 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6954/5 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 734k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6955 (OF300) ( 201k or 1269k )
Leftward of 6954, the flag is at the right and the SWC is at the left.
AS12-47-6955-56 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.4 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6955/6 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 871k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6956 (OF300) ( 222k or 1421k )
Leftward of 6955, centered on the SWC.
AS12-47-6956-57 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.1 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6956/7 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 724 )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6957 (OF300) ( 204k or 1244k )
Leftward of 6956, SWC at the right edge.
AS12-47-6957-58 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.0 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6957/8 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 625k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6958 (OF300) ( 185k or 1104k )
Leftward of 6957, toward the ALSEP Central Station with only a little overlap. Because the dimensions of the Central Station are well known and because the relative locations of the other pieces of gear can be determined from the ALSEP documentation photographs, pictures like this one can be used to accurately determine the Central Station location relative to the LM.
AS12-47-6958-59 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6958/9 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 735k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6959 (OF300) ( 166k or 958k )
Leftward of 6958. The ALSEP site is at the right.
AS12-47-6959-60 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.5 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph with perspective correction by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6959/60 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 804k or )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6960 (OF300) ( 166k or 1188k )
118:28:21 End of Al's 12 o'clock pan.
AS12-47-6961 (OF300) ( 206k or 949k )
118:30:43 First frame from Al's pan 8 o'clock position. We get a good view of the RTG fuel cask on the left while, on the right, Pete is working at the MESA. Ulli Lotzmann has created a comparison between 6961 and AS12-46-6790, taken before Pete started beating on the cask with the hammer. 6961 clearly shows marks on the cask resulting from the hammering.
AS12-47-6961/62 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.0 Mb
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6962 (OF300) ( 158k or 752k )
Leftward of 6961. Closed SEQ bay doors, thruster plume deflector.
AS12-47-6962/63 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.9 Mb
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6963 (OF300) ( 156k or 1106k )
Leftward of 6962.
AS12-47-6963/64 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.9 Mb
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6964 (OF300) ( 181k or 1332k )
Leftward of 6963.
AS12-47-6964/65 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.2 Mb
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6965 (OF300) ( 142k or 887k )
Leftward of 6964.
AS12-47-6965/66 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.9 Mb
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6966 (OF300) ( 174k or 1187k )
Leftward of 6965.
AS12-47-6966/67 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.1 Mb
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6967 (OF300) ( 189k or 1364k )
Leftward of 6966, centered on the two overlapping craters on the rim of Surveyor Crater.
AS12-47-6967/68 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.1 Mb
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6967/8 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 697k or 117k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6968 (OF300) ( 168k or 1303k )
Leftward of 6967, Surveyor III is at the left.
AS12-47-6968/69 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.9 Mb
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6969 (OF300) ( 116k or 855k )
Leftward of 6968, centered on Surveyor III. This photograph shows how steep the eastern wall appears when it is covered with deep shadow. See, also, enhanced versions at two resolutions ( 2,8Mb and 0.2Mb ).
AS12-47-6970 (OF300) ( 71k or 447k )
Leftward of 6969, up-Sun. Al may have moved slightly between frames.
AS12-47-6971 (OF300) ( 87k or 493k )
Leftward of 6970.
AS12-47-6972 (OF300) ( 88k or 491k )
Leftward of 6971, up-Sun.
AS12-47-6973 (OF300) ( 118k or 649k )
Leftward of 6972.
AS12-47-6973/74 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.0 Mb
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6974 (OF300) ( 154k or 901k )
Leftward of 6973.
AS12-47-6974/75 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.7 Mb
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6975 (OF300) ( 168k or 1001k )
Leftward of 6974.
AS12-47-6975/76 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 0.7 Mb
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6976 (OF300) ( 218k or 1338k )
Leftward of 6975.
AS12-47-6976/77 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.5 Mb
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6976/7 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 903k or 269k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6977 (OF300) ( 205k or 1251k )
Leftward of 6976, TV camera.
AS12-47-6977/78 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.5 Mb
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6977/8 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 787k or 210k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6978 (OF300) ( 190k or 1163k )
Leftward of 6977, TV camera and SWC.
AS12-47-6978/79 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.5 Mb
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6978/9 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 803k or 210k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6979 (OF300) ( 173k or 895k )
Leftward of 6978, TV camera, SWC, flag, and the S-Band antenna.
AS12-47-6979/80 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 789k or 205k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6980 (OF300) ( 169k or 800k )
Leftward of 6979, SWC, flag, S-Band antenna, Pete at the MESA, HTC, a bit overexposed.
AS12-47-6980/81 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.8 Mb
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-47-6980/1 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 862k or 208k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6981 (OF300) ( 198k or 944k )
118:30:43 Final frame from Al's 8 o'clock pan, showing Pete working at the MESA.
AS12-47-6982 (OF300) ( 180k or 923k )
118:33:10 First frame of Al's 4 o'clock pan, showing the ALSEP Central Station with the flag and the SWC on either side in the foreground. Journal Contributor Karl Dodenhoff notes that a detail shows two pieces of S-band antenna hardware discarded during its deployment.
AS12-47-6982/3 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 825k or 221k )
Al didn't move very far laterally, so the stereo effect for this pair is not strong. Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6983 (OF300) ( 148k or 828k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6982, centered on the US flag with the ALSEP array in the background at the right. Note the foot-grabbing loops on the TV cable.
AS12-47-6983/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 773k or 221k )
Al didn't move very far laterally, so the stereo effect for this pair is not strong. Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-6984 (OF300) ( 125k or 636k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6983. Down-Sun image with the U.S. Flag on the right and part of the S-Band shadow on the left. The flat object in the foreground is the S-Band antenna cover.
AS12-47-6985 (OF300) ( 115k or 584k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6984. Down-Sun image the S-Band antenna cover in the foreground, the S-Band shadow to the left of Al's shadow, the LM shadow on the far left. Note the foot-grabbing loops in the TV cable at the lower right.
AS12-47-6986 (OF300) ( 147k or 722k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6985, with the S-Band antenna on the left.
AS12-47-6987 (OF300) ( 185k or 836k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6986, Pete is working at the MESA, trying to get the rock box latched on the MESA table. The HTC is in the foreground.
AS12-47-6988 (OF300) ( 247k or 1098k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6987, centered on Pete at the MESA. Note the color/shadow chart hanging at the edge of the MESA. The ALSEP deployment tapes are hanging from the left side of the spacecraft. The S-Band is at the right side of the picture.
AS12-47-6989 (OF300) ( 240k or 1071k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6988, showing Pete at the MESA and, on the left, the minus-Z strut on the inner slope down into Surveyor crater. On-board measurements indicated that the spacecraft was pitched up (backwards) by 3 degrees and was rolled left (away from the camera in this picture) by 3.8 degrees.
AS12-47-6990 (OF300) ( 217k or 998k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6989, showing the plus-Y (north) footpad on the right and the minus-Z (east) footpad on the left with the southwest wall of Surveyor Crater in the background. Note the ALSEP deployment tapes on the farside of the LM and the bend plus-Y probe in the foreground.
AS12-47-6991 (OF300) ( 219k or 1312k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6990, showing the south wall of Surveyor Crater with the minus-Z (east) footpad on the left. Note the blocky ejecta upslope from the two fresh craters in the south wall. Block Crater on the north wall is surrounded by similar blocky ejecta, which undoubtedly represents local bedrock which may have been broken by the original Surveyor Crater impact and then dug out by the smaller impacts.
AS12-47-6992 (OF300) ( 201k or 1324k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6991, showing the southeastern wall of Surveyor Crater with the sunlit, upper structure of Surveyor III visible in the deep shadow of the eastern wall. Al may have just changed f-stops and seems to have gotten dust smudges on the center of the lens and on the upper left. There are no indications of smudges on 6991 or prior images.
AS12-47-6993 (OF300) ( 162k or 967k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6992 and centered on Surveyor III. See a detail.
AS12-47-6994 (OF300) ( 130k or 774k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6993 with Surveyor III just to the right of center.
AS12-47-6995 (OF300) ( 90k or 534k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6994 with the Sun on the left.
AS12-47-6996 (OF300) ( 85k or 492k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6995. Up-Sun.
AS12-47-6997 (OF300) ( 78k or 456k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6996. Up-Sun.
AS12-47-6998 (OF300) ( 85k or 487k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6997 with the Sun on the right.
AS12-47-6999 (OF300) ( 94k or 538k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6998, with a great deal of glare. Note the reflectivity of the smooth compressed surfaces in the foreground bootprints.
AS12-47-7000 (OF300) ( 157k or 885k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 6999, with the TV camera on the left.
AS12-47-7001 (OF300) ( 197k or 1237k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 7000, centered on the TV camera.
AS12-47-7001/2 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 807k or 219k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-7002 (OF300) ( 199k or 1182k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 7001, with the TV camera on the right. Note that the crater just beyond the TV camera to the left and the relatively large crater beyond the TV both have raised rims.
AS12-47-7002/3 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 911k or 228k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-7003 (OF300) ( 212k or 1351k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 7002.
AS12-47-7003/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 983k or 241k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-47-7004 (OF300) ( 210k or 1312k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 7003, with considerable overlap.
AS12-47-7005 (OF300) ( 208k or 1332k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 7004, with the Solar Wind Collector (SWC) in the distance on the left.
AS12-47-7006 (OF300) ( 185k or 1128k )
118:33:10 Leftward of 7005, and centered on the SWC.
AS12-47-7007 (OF300) ( 274k or 1406k )
118:35:45 Al took this cross-Sun picture from the south of a core tube he drove into the ground near the LM at the end of the first EVA. To drive the core, he attached it to an extension handle, which is what we see in this picture. Use of the extension handle made it possible for Al to hammer the core tube without having to lean over very far.
AS12-47-7008 (OF300) ( 287k or 1273k )
Similar to 7007.
AS12-47-7009 (OF300) ( 67k or 614k )
118:46:08 This photo and the next one are accidental exposures, taken after Al checked his frame counter. Al was holding the camera upside-down by the handle, in preparation for stowing the Hasselblad in the ETB. As can be seen in a composite made by rotating both frames by 180 degrees around the optical axis, Al had the lens pointing toward the ladder and caught Pete in the act of consulting his checklist.
AS12-47-7010 (OF300) ( 74k or 642k )
Similar to 7009.

The remaining 10 frames on magazine 47 were taken from inside the LM after the end of EVA-1.


AS12-47-7011 (OF300) ( 160k or 1548k )
Post-EVA-1 pan from Al's window. S-Band-antenna shadow.
AS12-47-7012 (OF300) ( 176k or 1578k )
Post-EVA-1 pan from Al's window. ALSEP, S-Band antenna shadow.
AS12-47-7013 (OF300) ( 193k or 1753k )
Post-EVA-1 pan from Al's window. Centered on the ALSEP.
AS12-47-7014 (OF300) ( 200k or 2052k )
Post-EVA-1 pan from Al's window. ALSEP on the left and the SWC and flag on the right.
AS12-47-7015 (OF300) ( 288k or 3401k )
Post-EVA-1 pan from Al's window. Flag, SWC, S-Band antenna.
AS12-47-7016 (OF300) ( 239k or 2864k )
Post-EVA-1 pan from Al's window. Flag, LM thrusters and S-Band antenna.
AS12-47-7017 (OF300) ( 261k or 2828k )
Post-EVA-1 pan from Al's window. Flag, LM thrusters and S-Band antenna. Better than 7016.
AS12-47-7018 (OF300) ( 264k or 1909k )
Post-EVA-1 pan from Al's window. Flag, SWC and S-Band antenna.
AS12-47-7019 (OF300) ( 229k or 1570k )
Post-EVA-1 pan from Al's window. Flag, SWC and ALSEP.
AS12-47-7020 (OF300) ( 163k or 1061k )
Post-EVA-1 pan from Al's window.
AS12-47-7021 (OF300) ( 91k or 469k )
Post-EVA-1 pan from Al's window. Partial frame.

Magazine 48/X (B & W) Frames 7022-7171

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

This Black and White magazine was used by Al Bean during EVA-2. The first 11 frames were taken from inside the LM before the first EVA.


AS12-48-7022 (OF300) ( 155k or 1069k )
111:58:43 View out Pete's window. Light-struck frame.
AS12-48-7023 (OF300) ( 165k or 955k )
111:58:43 View out Pete's window with LM shadow in the lower right corner.
AS12-48-7024 (OF300) ( 119k or 768k )
111:58:43 This down-Sun photo shows the LM shadow draped on a shallow crater west of the spacecraft. This is not Head Crater. The rim of a large crater about 4.5 km west of the LM can be seen on the horizon beyond the LM shadow.
AS12-48-7025 (OF300) ( 183k or 1023k )
View out Pete's window of the thrusters and the LM shadow.
AS12-48-7026 (OF300) ( 141k or 824k )
LM shadow.
AS12-48-7027 (OF300) ( 204k or 1037k )
Thruster and LM shadow.
AS12-48-7028 (OF300) ( 175k or 957k )
Extreme leftward view out Al's window.
AS12-48-7029 (OF300) ( 212k or 1148k )
Rightward of 7028, no footprints.
AS12-48-7029/32 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 502k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erik van Meijgaarden. This anaglyph shows the apparent lineations running in a direction perhaps 10-20 north of down-Sun. At 113:01:03 Al described a linear pattern running north-south.
AS12-48-7030 (OF300) ( 247k or 1389k )
Al's thruster. Note that there is no S-Band antenna nor an antenna shadow, flag, or SWC. Therefore, this sequence of pictures was taken prior to the first EVA.
AS12-48-7031 (OF300) ( 287k or 1458k )
Al's thruster.
AS12-48-7032 (OF300) ( 300k or 1519k )
Leftward of 7031. Centered on a foreground crater with a rock in it.
AS12-48-7033 (OF300) ( 340k or 1509k )
Near surface of the crater with the rock.

The next frame is the first one taken by Al during EVA-2.


AS12-48-7034 (OF300) ( 276k or 1297k )
132:00:36 Al took this view under the engine bell to show a rock that remained in place. Note the fuel cask dome at the left of center, with the dome removal tool still in place. The fuel cask is at the upper right.
AS12-48-7035 (OF300) ( 211k or 1168k )
Al moved in closer to get this up-Sun picture of the rock under the engine bell.
AS12-48-7036 (OF300) ( 186k or 1063k )
132:03:44 and 132:04:43 Down-Sun of the color/contrast chart which Al has positioned on the sunlit, western wall of a small crater, probably the one that was shown in 7032.
AS12-48-7037 (OF300) ( 189k or 1087k )
Similar to 7036. Pete may be in the upper left.
AS12-48-7038 (OF300) ( 137k or 960k )
132:06:37 Close-up, up-Sun photo of the contrast chart lying on the shadowed, eastern wall of a small crater.
AS12-48-7039 (OF300) ( 135k or 970k )
Al has stepped back to take this longer view of the contrast chart.
AS12-48-7040 (OF300) ( 220k or 1242k )
Similar to 7039. Note the well-defined footprints in the center of the crater which show that the surface there is quite soft. The footprints beyond the up-Sun rim are much less indented.
AS12-48-7041 (OF300) ( 129k or 800k )
132:07:59 Al took this down-Sun photo of the Solar Wind Collector to document the fact that the collector had not changed configuration during the rest period, contrary to an impression he had gained from looking at it from the cabin.
AS12-48-7042 (OF300) ( 150k or 792k )
132:07:59 Al took this cross-Sun view of the SWC from the north. The relative lack of footprints close to the SWC indicate the obvious; that is, in deploying the SWC, Al extended the pole to full length, unrolled the foil surface - in window-shade fashion - and hooked it at the bottom before planting the pole in the ground. Because of the stiffness of his suit, it would have been almost impossible to get the foil hooked at the bottom after planting the pole.
AS12-48-7043 (OF300) ( 281k or 1472k)
132:12:36 Al has stopped on his way over to Head Crater to collect a sample at a small crater. This picture is a cross-Sun "before" of the sample site from the north.
AS12-46-7043/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.7 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-48-7044 (OF300) ( 237k or 1301k)
Stereo companion to 7043.
AS12-48-7045 (OF300) ( 286k or 1500k)
132:13:01 Down-Sun "after" of the sample site.
AS12-48-7046 (OF300) ( 200k or 1157k)
132:16:13 Al takes a pair of down-Sun, unfiltered photos of the same area that Pete photographed cross-Sun with the polarization filter.
AS12-48-7047 (OF300) ( 181k or 1075k)
Slightly rightward of 7046.
AS12-48-7048 (OF300) ( 244k or 1330k)
132:21:08 Al's down-Sun of the first gnomon setup at Head Crater. Pete's shadow contains a great deal of detail, including his camera and hoses. Note the footprints beyond the gnomon. These are the footprints that revealed the light-colored soil layer.
AS12-48-7049 (OF300) ( 236k or 1305k)
132:22:16 Al's down-Sun of the second gnomon set up at Head Crater. This is a "before" of the spot where they will dig a trench down into the light-colored soil they have just discovered.
AS12-48-7050 (OF300) ( 239k or 1306k)
Al has backed up to get his shadow off the light-colored soil area.
AS12-48-7051 (OF300) ( 284k or 1477k)
132:24:45 This "after" of the trench does not show the small rock that Pete dug up at 132:26:02. I believe Al took the picture before Pete dug deeper and found the rock.
AS12-48-7052 (OF300) ( 311k or 1576k)
132:27:12 Al took this shot of the trench site after Pete removed the gnomon.
AS12-48-7053 (OF300) ( 232k or 1230k)
132:29:15 This is Al's first down-Sun photo of the 6-inch rock that he describes to Houston. After taking these pictures, either he or Pete will kick the rock over.
AS12-48-7054 (OF300) ( 202k or 1101k)
132:29:35 In this picture Al stepped closer to the rock to get a close-up but didn't notice that he'd gotten his shadow on it.
AS12-48-7055 (OF300) ( 204k or 1139k)
132:29:39 Al has gotten his shadow off the rock.
AS12-48-7056 (OF300) ( 191k or 1074k )
132:31:20 This is the first of Al's three "quick pictures" of Triple Crater. This one is toward the southwest. Note the shadow in the larger of the craters. Compare with Pete's photo AS12-49-7207 which was probably taken from the eastern rim of this crater. (See also AS12-49-7201.)
AS12-48-7057 (OF300) ( 146k or 925k )
Down-Sun with the shadow of the HTC.
AS12-48-7058 (OF300) ( 159k or 989k )
Slightly rightward of down-Sun.
AS12-48-7059 (OF300) ( 295k or 1472k )
132:33:43 Al took this "before" of sample 12052 from the northeast.
AS12-48-7060 (OF300) ( 200k or 1114k )
132:35:34 This is Al's down-Sun of the 1/2-meter boulder.
AS12-48-7061 (OF300) ( 244k or 1279k )
132:35:45 Al has stepped to his right to take this picture of the 1/2-meter boulder from the northeast. Pete has backed up to take a picture from 15 feet.
AS12-48-7062 (OF300) ( 303k or 1438k )
132:36:31 Boulder at Bench Crater. Pete is beyond the rock. The gnomon is at the left edge of the picture. Pete has disturbed the skirt of dirt (called a fillet) that surrounds the 1/2-meter boulder. Somewhat surprisingly, he and Al seem not to have taken a sample of the fillet material. Filleting is the result of ejecta from nearby impacts splashing against the side of the rock and falling to the base.
AS12-48-7063 (OF300) ( 233k or 1275k )
132:40:16 Al's down-Sun "before" of the first sample site at Bench Crater.
AS12-48-7064 (OF300) ( 207k or 1183k )
132:42:18 Al's down-Sun of the partially buried boulder at Bench Crater.
AS12-48-7065 (OF300) ( 237k or 1270k )
132:57:43 Al's down-Sun "before" of the Sharp trench.
AS12-48-7066 (OF300) ( 227k or 1240k )
Stereo companion to 7065.
AS12-48-7067 (OF300) ( 213k or 1191k )
132:58:18 Al's down-Sun photo of the gnomon and trench at Sharp Crater is spoiled by his shadow. Pete is taking a cross-Sun from Al's right and that photo is AS12-49-7276.
AS12-48-7068 (OF300) ( 205k or 1159k )
133:03:46 Al has driven a core into the bottom of the Sharp Trench. This is the first image of a down-Sun stereopair. Note that Al has moved to the side to get his shadow off the sampling area. Ulli Lotzmann has created anaglyphs from 7068 and 7069.
AS12-48-7069 (OF300) ( 208k or 1130k )
133:03:46 Stereo companion to 7068. Al stepped to his right between frames. Ulli Lotzmann has created anaglyphs from 7068 and 7069.
AS12-48-7070 (OF300) ( 281k or 1424k )
133:07:09 This is Al's "before" picture of the small rocks that Pete will collect and put into the gas sample can (SESC). We can also see the shadow of Pete's tongs.
AS12-48-7071 (OF300) ( 106k or 669k )
133:15:32 Al's picture of Pete taking Al's picture. Pete is holding the extension handle in his left hand. Note that he has re-attached the scoop. His cuff checklist can be seen on his left wrist and is open to one of the pages on which the backup crew has pasted a picture of a Playboy Playmate. Pete's watch is on his sleeve between his pressure gauge and his elbow. The LM is in the background, over Pete's left shoulder. A labeled detail shows the upper straps holding the Surveyor Parts Bag on the back of Pete's PLSS. Compare with a relevant pre-flight photo.
AS12-48-7072 (OF300) ( 298k or 1528k )
133:17:16 Al's picture from the northeast.
AS12-48-7073 (OF300) ( 296k or 1497k )
Companion to 7072.
AS12-48-7074 (OF300) ( 267k or 1320k )
133:18:10 Al has backed up to give a longer view of the sample site. Pete is holding the scoop in his right hand.
AS12-48-7075 (OF300) ( 346k or 1626k )
This is the second of Al's three photos taken at 15-foot focus of the area of unusual soil.
AS12-48-7076 (OF300) ( 289k or 1479k )
Al has turned to his left to take this third picture of the area of unusual soil.
AS12-48-7077 (OF300) ( 260k or 1316k )
133:28:04 Al's down-Sun of the double core.
AS12-48-7078 (OF300) ( 178k or 1232k )
AS12-48-7079 (OF300) ( 120k or 1067k )
133:47:22 Washed out during the magazine switch (no photo link).
AS12-48-7080 (OF300) ( 100k or 862k )
133:47:22 Washed out during the magazine switch (no photo link).
AS12-48-7081 (OF300) ( 102k or 893k )
133:47:22 Washed out during the magazine switch (no photo link).

At this point Al Bean discarded his faulty Hasselblad camera with magazine 48 and borrowed Pete's camera with magazine 49. When he finished magazine 49 he replaced it with this magazine (48), causing the washout of the last four frames above.


AS12-48-7082 (OF300) ( 205k or 1124k )
133:50:42 Down-Sun "before" of the beaded-glass location. The HTC is partially obscured by Al's shadow. (Also see discussion at 133:42:57.)
AS12-48-7083 (OF300) ( 312k or 1442k )
The pattern of small rocks indicates that this is a cross-Sun companion to 7082. The picture shows detail on the HTC and also shows the gnomon and, at the right side, the head of Pete's scoop. (Also see discussion at 133:42:57.)
AS12-48-7084 (OF300) ( 211k or 1115k )
133:54:25 View of the Surveyor III spacecraft from the rest stop on the inner slope of Surveyor Crater. Block Crater is near the Surveyor Crater rim above and to the left of the Surveyor. Al Bean took this picture with Pete's camera, but with the magazine salvaged from his own camera. The pair of rocks between the Surveyor and Block Crater were the key to Ewan Whitaker's identification of the Surveyor III crater in a Lunar Orbiter photo of the area.
AS12-48-7085 (OF300) ( 219k or 1139k )
133:54:25 Similar to 7084.
AS12-48-7086 (OF300) ( 160k or 870k )
Similar to 7084.
AS12-48-7087 (OF300) ( 191k or 1023k )
Similar to 7084.
AS12-48-7088 (OF300) ( 222k or 1170k )
133:56:30 Pete and Al entered Surveyor Crater from the south rim and walked counterclockwise as they made their cross-slope down toward Surveyor III. This photo shows Surveyor III with Block Crater above and to the left, just below the rim of Surveyor Crater. Note the change in relative directions to the spacecraft and to Block Crater compared to 7087.
AS12-48-7089 (OF300) ( 238k or 1211k )
Similar to 7088.
AS12-48-7090/89 ( 1.3 Mb )
Al turned a bit to his left between 7089 and 7090, enough to give some stereo separation in the foreground but not enough to give much separation between Suveyor III and the crater wall beyond. Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-48-7090 (OF300) ( 248k or 1271k )
133:56:30 Jim Scotti notes that Al took 7090 from virtually the same spot as 7089 but had turned a bit to his left.
AS12-48-7091 (OF300) ( 223k or 1151k )
133:56:30 On 8 Septermber 2011, JIm Scotti wrote, "7091 was taken after al move farther CCW around the crater, so the LM and Surveyor are closer to being lined up. Obviously a slight adjustment in the time of the exposure would be needed as 7091 would have been taken after a short bit of movement and 7092 taken even later as Al moved behind the medium sized rim crater above the Surveyor. It would take some work to make a better estimate of the actual times of each exposure, but the current version is clearly off just a bit. It was fun comparing each photo to the new LRO image and seeing very distinctly in some spots a disturbance in the tracks that looked like maybe Al was standing there moving around as he took a set of photos. I need to print out some of the photos and the LRO image and do some triangulation - we can probably get the site of the photo down to an area a couple meters in size or less!" This photo shows Surveyor III, the Apollo 12 LM Intrepid, and Block Crater.

Coincidently, on 7 September 2011, Andrew Chaikin created a comparison between 7091 and a newly-released LROC image M168353795RE, which shows the landing site in incredible detail. Chaikin's comparison emphasizes various craters and rocks on the inner, north wall of Surveyor Crater.

AS12-48-7092 (OF300) ( 158k or 922k )
133:56:30 Al has moved farther counter-clockwise, as can be seen from a comparison of the relative positions of the Surveyor and the LM in this picture and in 7090. Note the mast-mounted solar panels on the Surveyor. These were in sunlight at the end of the first EVA and can be seen in AS12-47-6993 which is a frame from a pan taken near the LM. The Surveyor's scoop, used to dig small trenches in the weeks immediately following its landing, can be seen sticking out at the right side of the spacecraft.
AS12-48-7093 (OF300) ( 156k or 957k)
133:57:21 Al has moved farther counter-clockwise and the LM is now out of the field-of-view off the right edge.
AS12-48-7094 (OF300) ( 255k or 1187k)
133:59:16 This is almost certainly Al's picture of "those little lines running along through the crater". The lines cross the picture from right to left on a downward slope of about 30 degrees.
AS12-48-7095 (OF300) ( 291k or 1349k)
Al seems to be doing a mini-pan along the trend of the "little lines".
AS12-48-7096 (OF300) ( 217k or 1185k)
This is probably a third frame in a mini-pan along the trend of the "little lines".
AS12-48-7097 (OF300) ( 315k or 1441k)
133:59:16 Al has turned to his right to take a picture of Block Crater from the same spot where he took the mini-pan of the "little lines". The pair of identifying boulders used by Whitaker are between us and Block Crater, more or less in line with the left rim.
AS12-48-7098 (OF300) ( 188k or 1059k)
Soil near the Surveyor scoop.
AS12-48-7099 (OF300) ( 218k or 1121k)
134:05:12 Taken at 15-foot focus looking across the Surveyor toward the LM.
AS12-48-7099/7100 ( 158k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Jim Scotti from his own scans.
AS12-48-7099/7100 ( 837k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Erik van Meijgaarden from the JSC high-resolution scans from the original film.
AS12-48-7100 (OF300) ( 176k or 922k )
134:05:18 Surveyor III and the LM. The TV camera is the vertical cylinder to the right of the solar-panel mast and the scoop can be seen extended out to the right. The Surveyor landed on a slope and bounced and slid a short way before coming to rest. Visual evidence comes from the left-hand footpad, which is dug into the soil, and the foreground footpad, which made two distinct imprints nearer us before coming to rest. The Surveyor III scoop was designed by Caltech Professor of Engineering Ronald Scott.
AS12-48-7101 (OF300) ( 264k or 1285k )
134:06:25 With this frame, Al starts a sequence of pictures running along the Surveyor scoop arm from the scoop in toward the body of the spacecraft.
AS12-48-7102 (OF300) ( 249k or 1213k )
This picture shows the scoop and the first two sections of the arm.
AS12-48-7103 (OF300) ( 273k or 1294k )
The scoop is out of the picture off the right edge. Block Crater is in the background.
AS12-48-7104 (OF300) ( 224k or 1068k )
This frame shows the Surveyor TV camera and the small color/contrast chart that was placed on the end of a short boom to give experimenters on Earth a means of calibrating the TV images.
AS12-48-7105 (OF300) ( 192k or 962k )
134:06:50 Close-up of the Surveyor III TV camera and color/contrast chart. Block Crater is at the upper right.
AS12-48-7106 (OF300) ( 253k or 1174k )
134:07:21 Here, Al is taking pictures of the small trenches that had been dug with the Surveyor scoop in the weeks following its landing in April 1967.
AS12-48-7107 (OF300) ( 276k or 1282k )
134:07:21 This is the second of four photos Al took of the marks made by the Surveyor scoop.
AS12-48-7108 (OF300) ( 230k or 1085k )
Surveyor trenches.
AS12-48-7109 (OF300) ( 246k or 1137k )
Surveyor trenches.
AS12-48-7110 (OF300) ( 286k or 1316k )
134:07:32 The Surveyor has three footpads, an arrangement that increased the chances that the spacecraft would remain upright, no matter where it landed, as long as the descent was vertical. This is a photo of the up-Sun footpad from the south, with the two footpad imprints made during the landing. The scoop is in the background.

Journal Contributor Lunateg has created an animated comparison (0.4 Mb or 1.0 Mb) between a detail from 7110 and a Surveyor III TV image reproduced on page 123 of the Surveyor III Mission Report, Part III: Television Data (79 Mb, PDF). Highlighted in color are three small rocks or soil clumps on the floor of the footpad print, three linear features on the floor, one linear feature on the wall (in orange), and two areas of cracking high on the wall. Note that the Surveyor TV images includes square a 5 x 5 matrix of black spots produced on the photoconductor surface in the vidicon sensor, much like the Reseau crosses on the EVA Hasselblad images. See page 7 in the Surveyor III TV report. A TV image on page 41, among others, shows the matrix more clearly than does the footpad image on page 123.

AS12-48-7111 (OF300) ( 280k or 1285k )
Close-up of the upslope footpad and the multiple imprints it made during the landing. Note the pile of dirt on the footpad. Journal Contributor Brian Lawrence notes that the pile was put there by JPL engineer Floyd Roberson using the scoop. Scoop marks can be seen beyond the footpad.
AS12-48-7112 (OF300) ( 294k or 1326k )
134:08:07 Al has moved downhill to his left to take two more pictures of the up-Sun footpad. As per checklist, Al has disturbed the surface near the footpad.
AS12-48-7113 (OF300) ( 306k or 1366k )
Stereo companion to 7112.
AS12-48-7114 (OF300) ( 229k or 1072k )
134:08:26 The Surveyor III vernier engine is just below and to the right of the central fiducial, as indicated in a labeled version. The engine bell is dark gray in this black-and-white photo. Two fuel sacks are visible beyond it.
AS12-48-7115 (OF300) ( 190k or 1068k )
134:09:09 Surveyor III "large box A".
AS12-48-7116 (OF300) ( 189k or 1062k )
Al has stepped to his left to take this stereo companion to 7115.
AS12-48-7117 (OF300) ( 186k or 1128k )
134:10:26 Al has made a short streak on the center-forward section of the mirrored surface on the top of the Surveyor. Note the warped mirror segments.
AS12-48-7118 (OF300) ( 226k or 1128k )
134:10:43 Surveyor III "small box".
AS12-48-7119 (OF300) ( 189k or 937k )
134:11:06 Close-up of the downhill footpad (Number 3) and the gouge it made during the landing.
AS12-48-7120 (OF300) ( 199k or 1017k )
Stereo companion of 7119.
AS12-48-7121 (OF300) ( 227k or 1128k )
134:12:09 Al took this excellent photograph of the Surveyor III spacecraft from a distance of about 15 feet. Block Crater is at the upper left.
AS12-48-7122 (OF300) ( 145k or 677k )
134:12:14 Al has pointed the camera toward the top of the Surveyor, causing Pete's "aiming too high" comment.
AS12-48-7123 (OF300) ( 134k or 842k )
134:12:41 Surveyor III solar array from 15 feet.
AS12-48-7124 (OF300) ( 201k or 1084k )
134:13:06 Up-Sun photo of the Surveyor III north footpad.
AS12-48-7125 (OF300) ( 182k or 928k )
134:13:27 The small box with fractured glass on the top is the one just below and to the left of the center of the image. Cylindrical object to the right of the small box is the so-called Canopus seeker, used during flight to orient the spacecraft relative to the bright star Canopus.
AS12-48-7126 (OF300) ( 271k or 1283k )
134:14:37 First in a series of four cross-Sun pictures from the north of the Surveyor III trenches. The idea behind these pictures is to look for changes in the two and a half years since the trenches were dug and recorded with the Surveyor TV camera.
AS12-48-7127 (OF300) ( 274k or 1302k )
Surveyor III trenches.
AS12-48-7128 (OF300) ( 263k or 1291k )
134:14:37 Third in a series of four cross-Sun pictures from the north of the Surveyor III trenches.
AS12-48-7129 (OF300) ( 263k or 1297k )
Surveyor III trenches. Note the steep walls on the impressions made by the scoop. The small, square shaped imprint was probably made with the tip of the scoop as part of a load-bearing experiment.
AS12-48-7130 (OF300) ( 137k or 965k )
134:15:29 Surveyor III TV mirror at f/5.6.
AS12-48-7131 (OF300) ( 134k or 888k )
134:15:49 Surveyor III TV mirror at f/8. Note the place where Pete used his finger to wipe some dust off. The line runs upward from the center.
AS12-48-7132 (OF300) ( 131k or 912k )
134:15:49 Surveyor III TV mirror at f/8. Note the place where Pete used his finger to wipe some dust off. The line runs upward from the center. Second image in a stereopair.
AS12-48-7133 (OF300) ( 171k or 948k )
134:16:43 "Tourist" picture of Pete at the Surveyor III spacecraft. We know this is Pete because he has his tongs attached to his hip mounted "yo-yo". Note that his footprints are not any deeper than those he made around the LM.
AS12-48-7133/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 393k )
Red-blue anaglyph by Patrick Vantuyne.
AS12-48-7134 (OF300) ( 185k or 1014k )
134:16:54 Pete is "jiggling" the spacecraft to see if it is firmly planted.

Al lent the camera to Pete, who took two "tourist" pictures of Al before returning the camera to him.


AS12-48-7135 (OF300) ( 179k or 1006k )
134:17:30 Pete's "tourist" picture of Al at the Surveyor III spacecraft with the LM in the background.
AS12-48-7136 (OF300) ( 176k or 979k )
134:17:30 Similar to 7135.
AS12-48-7137 (OF300) ( 170k or 1096k )
134:24:45 This picture shows the mirrored surface on the top of Surveyor III Box A. Pete seems to have bent one of the mirror segments, perhaps with the boltcutters. This is the same segment that Al wiped previously.
AS12-48-7138 (OF300) ( 218k or 1053k )
134:30:00 Surveyor III battery.
AS12-48-7139 (OF300) ( 252k or 1191k )
134:32:11 This rock picture was taken no earlier than 134:32:11 and no later than 134:33:55.
AS12-48-7140 (OF300) ( 167k or 935k )
134:39:50 Misunderstanding Pete, Al started a pan of Surveyor Crater from near Block Crater, rather than a pan of Block Crater, itself. We can see some of the tracks that Pete and Al made as they started down into the crater toward the Surveyor. As indicated in a labeled version, the tracks go into the crater at a very shallow slope.
AS12-48-7141 (OF300) ( 249k or 1211k )
134:40:09 This is the first frame of a left-to-right partial pan Al took of Block Crater, showing how deeply shadowed the inside of the crater was. Surveyor III is at the upper left.
AS12-48-7142 (OF300) ( 176k or 1048k )
134:40:09 Second frame in Al's first Block Crater pans. Al overexposed it in an attempt to show details in the shadowed areas.
AS12-48-7143 (OF300) ( 170k or 1027k )
134:40:09 Final frame in Al's first Block Crater pan, with Intrepid at the right.
AS12-48-7144 (OF300) ( 250k or 1197k )
134:40:09 Al stepped to his right to take a second left-to-right partial pan of Block Crater. This first frame shows Surveyor III at top center.
AS12-48-7145 (OF300) ( 207k or 1029k )
134:40:09 Second frame of Al's second partial pan of Block Crater. Surveyor III is at the top left. the tracks that Pete and Al made on their way toward the spacecraft extends from the upper right at a shallow angle, taking them to a point above Surveyor.
AS12-48-7146 (OF300) ( 238k or 1279k )
134:40:09 Third frame of Al's second partial pan of Block Crater.
AS12-48-7147 (OF300) ( 223k or 1266k )
134:40:09 Final frame of Al's second partial pan of Block Crater.
AS12-48-7148 (OF300) ( 243k or 1219k )
134:41:22 Cross-sun "before" of the Block Crater sample area. Al is a little too far away for ideal focus.
AS12-48-7149 (OF300) ( 271k or 1316k )
Al seems to have moved in to the proper focus distance for this cross-Sun of the Block Crater sample area which Pete is about to sample with his tongs. This picture gives us a particularly good look at Pete's yo-yo cable. We can see the open checklist on his left wrist. Note the dirt on Pete's legs, particularly below the knees.
AS12-48-7150 (OF300) ( 273k or 1341k )
Al has stepped to his left to take this stereo companion to 7149.
AS12-48-7151 (OF300) ( 85k or 655k )
134:45:02 Pete is back at the LM, having gone on ahead of Al. There is not a lot of detail visible in this down-Sun photo.
AS12-48-7151/2 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 5Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Kevin Frank.
AS12-48-7152 (OF300) ( 86k or 662k )
134:45:02 Al's photo shows Pete at the MESA and was probably taken while Al was still making his way to the spacecraft from Blocky Crater.

The remaining 19 frames on magazine 48 were taken from inside the LM after the end of EVA-2.


AS12-48-7153 (OF300) ( 160k or 1012k )
135:45:48 Post-EVA-2 shot out Pete's window, showing the thrusters. There are some footprints in close, but none near or beyond the small, blocky rimmed crater.
AS12-48-7154 (OF300) ( 140k or 948k )
Rightward of 7153, showing about half the LM shadow.
AS12-48-7155 (OF300) ( 96k or 711k )
Rightward of 7154, LM shadow, mediocre focus, but showing the scribe marks on Pete's window.
AS12-48-7156 (OF300) ( 142k or 906k )
Near-surface shot showing the small, blocky rimmed crater, overexposed.
AS12-48-7157 (OF300) ( 129k or 879k )
LM shadow, poor picture.
AS12-48-7158 (OF300) ( 91k or 624k )
Detail of the LM shadow.
AS12-48-7159 (OF300) ( 217k or 1232k )
Post-EVA photo out Al's window. The cord in the foreground is the Lunar Equipment Conveyor (LEC), the clothesline-like device they used to transport gear between the surface and the cabin. We can also see the shadow of the S-Band antenna and, in the background, the ALSEP.
AS12-48-7160 (OF300) ( 304k or 1418k )
Rightward of 7159, showing the S-Band antenna shadow, the MESA or HTC shadow, part of the thruster, and the footprints that Al made while he was doing the contrast-chart photography at the beginning of the EVA.
AS12-48-7161 (OF300) ( 223k or 1155k )
Near-surface near the S-Band antenna shadow, with many footprints.
AS12-48-7162 (OF300) ( 227k or 1176k )
Thrusters, U.S. flag.
AS12-48-7163 (OF300) ( 299k or 1545k )
Better picture of the S-Band shadow and Al's footprints in the crater.
AS12-48-7164 (OF300) ( 212k or 1193k )
Thrusters.
AS12-48-7165 (OF300) ( 155k or 985k )
Thrusters.
AS12-48-7166 (OF300) ( 164k or 1004k )
U.S. flag.
AS12-48-7167 (OF300) ( 148k or 908k )
Flag, ALSEP.
AS12-48-7168 (OF300) ( 139k or 899k )
ALSEP.
AS12-48-7169 (OF300) ( 179k or 1084k )
Good picture of the footprints that Pete and Al made going out to the ALSEP.
AS12-48-7170 (OF300) ( 137k or 941k )
Similar to 7169 but not as good.
AS12-48-7171 (OF300) ( 48k or 494k )
Similar to 7169, but pointed too high to be of interest.

Magazine 49/Z (B & W) Frames 7172-7324

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

This magazine was initially used by Pete Conrad during EVA-2. Later in the EVA, Al Bean borrowed Pete's camera when his own malfunctioned, and completed the magazine.


Calibration Chart (OF300) ( 220k or 836k ) AS12-49-7172 (OF300) ( 108k or 872k )
132:12:17 Pete has started a series of pictures taken with a polarization filter on his camera. The detailed photoplan for this series can be found on checklist page Sur-81. This first picture is badly lightstruck.
AS12-49-7173 (OF300) ( 176k or 1000k )
132:12:17 This picture shows the footprints that Pete mentions in the dialog at 132:15:25 and, in the background, Head Crater. The two rocks that Pete has turned over are to the right of the large, partially buried boulder. Note that, while the photoplan calls for the photos to be taken from the south, he is actually taking them from the north.
AS12-49-7174 (OF300) ( 188k or 1100k )
During this sequence of photos, Pete moves to his right and changes f-stop settings after each set of three pictures, but turning the camera to show the same scene. See his checklist page 10.
AS12-49-7175 (OF300) ( 200k or 1100k )
Polarization picture.
AS12-49-7176 (OF300) ( 184k or 1100k )
Polarization picture.
AS12-49-7177 (OF300) ( 200k or 1100k )
Polarization picture.
AS12-49-7178 (OF300) ( 192k or 1100k )
Polarization picture.
AS12-49-7179 (OF300) ( 192k or 1100k )
Polarization picture.
AS12-49-7180 (OF300) ( 212k or 1200k )
Polarization picture.
AS12-49-7181 (OF300) ( 224k or 1200k )
Polarization picture.
AS12-49-7182 (OF300) ( 204k or 1200k )
132:12:17 This photo is part of a sequence Pete took with a polarization filter, moving to his right and changing f-stop settings after each set of three pictures, but turning the camera to show the same scene. See his checklist page 10. The view is toward the south from the north rim of Head Crater.
AS12-49-7183 (OF300) ( 204k or 1200k )
Polarization picture. Note the deep shadow on the eastern wall of Head Crater.
AS12-49-7184 (OF300) ( 188k or 1100k )
Polarization picture.
AS12-49-7185 (OF300) ( 192k or 1100k )
Polarization picture.
AS12-49-7186 (OF300) ( 180k or 1000k )
132:12:17 Pete has stepped farther to his right, giving us a view of the western wall of Head Crater. A comparison of this photograph with AS12-49-7182 shows the effect that shadow has on one's impression of slopes. Head Crater is quite symmetrical and the slopes of the eastern and western walls are actually little different.
AS12-49-7187 (OF300) ( 156k or 944k )
Polarization picture, Pete may have been moving slightly when he took this picture, causing it to be blurred.
AS12-49-7188 (OF300) ( 168k or 1008k )
132:12:17 and 132:15:19 This is the last of Pete's polarization photos.
AS12-49-7189 (OF300) ( 188k or 1000k )
132:20:42 This is Pete's cross-Sun from the south of the first gnomon set up at Head Crater.
AS12-49-7190 (OF300) ( 184k or 1000k )
Stereo companion of 7189.
AS12-49-7191 (OF300) ( 200k or 1100k )
132:21:54 Pete has moved the gnomon about 5 to 10 feet down-Sun so that it is sitting just beyond the scuff marks where they discovered the light-colored soil.
AS12-49-7192 (OF300) ( 172k or 1000k )
132:22:07 Stereo companion of 7191.
AS12-49-7193 (OF300) ( 232k or 1200k )
132:24:52 Cross-Sun picture from the south of the trench that Pete dug at Head Crater. The foreground object is a gnomon which provides a length scale, the local vertical, a shadow for Sun orientation, and a color/gray scale on the upright member for photoprocessing calibration. Gnomons used on later missions had a color/gray scale affixed to one of the legs - which leg the astronauts oriented toward the Sun whenever they put it down. The two shadows beyond the gnomon are Al's and the HTC's.
AS12-49-7194 (OF300) ( 224k or 1200k )
Stereo companion of 7193.
AS12-49-7195 (OF300) ( 220k or 1100k )
132:26:19 This picture shows a small rock that Pete has pulled up out of the trench. This sample is 12034 and is one of the few breccias that Pete and Al collected.
AS12-49-7196 (OF300) ( 212k or 1100k )
Stereo companion of 7195.
AS12-49-7197 (OF300) ( 236k or 1200k )
132:29:20 Pete has put the gnomon down next to the 6-inch rock that Al described to Houston. This is a cross-Sun taken before either Pete or Al kicked the rock over. Head Crater is in the background.
AS12-49-7198 (OF300) ( 220k or 1100k )
Stereo companion to 7197.
AS12-49-7199 (OF300) ( 216k or 1100k )
Pete has removed the gnomon.
AS12-49-7200 (OF300) ( 216k or 1100k )
Stereo companion to 7199. This picture shows the footprints that Al made when he was examining the rock.
AS12-49-7201 (OF300) ( 196k or 1100k )
132:32:06 Pete has begun a pan at Triple Crater. A comparison of this pan with the Triple Crater photos (AS12-48-7056 to 7058) that Al took at 132:31:20 indicate that Pete is standing just a few meters south and east of the spot from which Al took his pictures. This first photo shows the view just to the right of up-Sun and of the northern rim of Head Crater.
AS12-49-7202 (OF300) ( 196k or 1100k )
Rightward of 7201 with good overlap.
AS12-49-7203 (OF300) ( 176k or 1100k )
Rightward of 7202.
AS12-49-7204 (OF300) ( 164k or 1000k )
Rightward of 7203.
AS12-49-7205 (OF300) ( 132k or 912k )
Rightward of 7204.
AS12-49-7206 (OF300) ( 120k or 924k )
Rightward of 7205.
AS12-49-7207 (OF300) ( 104k or 848k )
132:31:20 Rightward of 7206, down-Sun. Note that the walls of the foreground crater are steep enough to produce a shadow. This may be the same crater and shadow that are shown in Al's photo AS12-48-7056.
AS12-49-7208 (OF300) ( 136k or 932k )
Rightward of 7207.
AS12-49-7209 (OF300) ( 152k or 988k )
Rightward of 7208.
AS12-49-7210 (OF300) ( 140k or 880k )
Rightward of 7209. This view to the north shows the HTC. The photo is slightly blurred, probably because Pete was moving a bit when he took it.
AS12-49-7211 (OF300) ( 160k or 940k )
Rightward of 7210. HTC at the left with Al's footprints coming down from the north.
AS12-49-7212 (OF300) ( 176k or 1000k )
Rightward of 7211. Al is at the right edge of the image.
AS12-49-7213 (OF300) ( 144k or 976k )
132:22:59 Frame from Pete's Triple Crater pan. View of the eastern wall of Head Crater with the LM in the background and Al moving from right to left in the foreground. This picture gives a side view of the trigger/handle assembly on his camera. Note, also, a pack of flat sample bags that Pete attached to Al's saddlebag, probably at 131:57:24.
AS12-49-7214 (OF300) ( 124k or 952k )
132:22:59 Frame from Pete's Triple Crater pan centered on the LM, with Head Crater in the foreground. The lower portion of the Descent Stage is hidden by an intervening ridge. The astronauts are much too close to the LM for the curvature of the Moon to obscure any part of the spacecraft from the view of the camera. Also see comments at 132:31:52.
AS12-49-7215 (OF300) ( 120k or 952k )
Up-Sun view of the shadowed, eastern wall of Head Crater
AS12-49-7216 (OF300) ( 112k or 968k )
This is the last picture in Pete's pan at Triple Crater. Badly sunstruck up-Sun.
AS12-49-7217 (OF300) ( 240k or 1200k )
132:33:43 Pete's down-Sun "before" of sample 12052. We can see Al's shadow with the HTC.
AS12-49-7218 (OF300) ( 216k or 1100k )
Stereo companion to 7217.
AS12-49-7219 (OF300) ( 196k or 1000k )
132:35:34 Pete's close-up of the 1/2-meter boulder from the southeast.
AS12-49-7220 (OF300) ( 172k or 1004k )
Stereo companion of 7219.
AS12-49-7221 (OF300) ( 232k or 1200k )
132:35:45 Pete has backed away from the 1/2-meter boulder to take a cross-Sun from the south. Good view of the HTC and of the gnomon next to the boulder. The long-thin shadow is made by the scoop, which Pete has stuck into the ground.
AS12-49-7222 (OF300) ( 232k or 1200k )
132:35:45 Cross-Sun from the south of the 1/2 meter boulder. The foreground object is Pete's scoop - attached to an extension handle. The gnomon is in position up-Sun of the rock and the HTC is beyond the scoop handle. At the upper right, we can see Al's right arm and his camera lens.
AS12-49-7223 (OF300) ( 196k or 1100k )
132:38:22 Pete starts a pan at Bench Crater. This first frame starts at the north edge of the crater. The walls are noticeably steeper than those in Surveyor Crater and in Head Crater.
AS12-49-7223/4 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.5 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-49-7224 (OF300) ( 184k or 1100k )
Rightward of 7223, showing the rubble pile in the bottom of the crater.
AS12-49-7224/5 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.6 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-49-7225 (OF300) ( 196k or 1100k )
Rightward of 7224, showing some large rocks both in the central rubble pile and on the walls just outside the shadowed area.
AS12-49-7225/6 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.5 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-49-7226 (OF300) ( 176k or 1000k )
Rightward of 7225, with the shadowed area now on the left.
AS12-49-7226/7 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.4 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-49-7227 (OF300) ( 140k or 868k )
132:38:22 Rightward of 7226, showing the southern rim.
AS12-49-7227/8 Red-Blue Anaglyph (0.5 Mb)
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-49-7228 (OF300) ( 116k or 808k )
Rightward of 7227.
AS12-49-7229 (OF300) ( 140k or 892k )
Pete has stepped to his left and begins a right-to-left pan. This frame is aimed to the left of 7228.
AS12-49-7230 (OF300) ( 172k or 988k )
Leftward of 7229, almost to the edge of the shadowed area.
AS12-49-7231 (OF300) ( 176k or 1008k )
Leftward of 7230.
AS12-49-7232 (OF300) ( 168k or 980k )
Leftward of 7231, showing the central mound and the large blocks.
AS12-49-7233 (OF300) ( 172k or 1012k )
132:38:22 Leftward of 7223, with the central mound at the right side. This is the last frame in Pete's second pan.
AS12-49-7234 (OF300) ( 224k or 1200k )
132:40:12 Pete takes a stereo pair of "before" photos of the first sample site at Bench Crater. Both photos are cross-Suns taken from the north. As he takes the pictures, he counts "One potato. Two potatoes".
AS12-49-7235 (OF300) ( 212k or 1100k )
132:40:14 "Two potato" stereo companion to 7234.
AS12-49-7236 (OF300) ( 224k or 1100k )
132:42:18 Pete's cross-Sun stereo of the partially buried boulder at Bench Crater.
AS12-49-7237 (OF300) ( 196k or 1000k )
Stereo companion of 7236.
AS12-49-7238 (OF300) ( 216k or 1100k )
Pete has taken a stereo pair of the up-Sun area between the gnomon and the rim of Bench Crater. His reason for taking these pictures is not clear.
AS12-49-7239 (OF300) ( 224k or 1100k )
Stereo companion of 7238.
AS12-49-7240 (OF300) ( 172k or 996k )
132:47:43 Cross-Sun stereophoto of a rock on the rim of Bench Crater. Al does not take a down-Sun companion of these pictures.
AS12-48-7240-41 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Eric Jones.
AS12-49-7241 (OF300) ( 160k or 936k )
Stereo companion of 7240.
AS12-49-7242 (OF300) ( 256k or 1200k )
132:47:52 Pete took this cross-Sun from the south at some point not long after he took 7241. This picture shows good detail of the HTC and Al's boots. The dirt patterns on Al's knees indicate that he has been kneeling prior to this point in the EVA. On the HTC, note the "Dixie cup" sample bags, the core tubes, and the flat, individual sample bags. Pete has stuck the scoop into the ground.
AS12-49-7243 (OF300) ( 244k or 1200k )
132:47:52 Stereo companion to 7242. The HTC is at the left and, on the corner closest to Al's leg we can see a stack of "Dixie cup" sample containers. On the inside of the HTC, we can see the top edges of some flat sample bags and, below them, some core tube sections.
AS12-49-7244 (OF300) ( 128k or 972k )
132:53:22 This is the first picture in a pan Pete took prior to their arrival at Sharp Crater. It shows the view slightly leftward of up-Sun.
AS12-49-7245 (OF300) ( 108k or 928k )
Up-Sun. Al is under the Sun with the HTC.
AS12-49-7246 (OF300) ( 136k or 1000k )
132:53:22 In this frame from a pan Pete took just before he and Al arrived at Sharp Crater, Al is at right center, almost lost in the up-Sun glare. He is looking back toward Bench Crater, possibly to get his bearings. The HTC is on the ground just to the right of him and the LM and S-Band antenna are on the horizon at the left edge of the picture. Pete and Al are coming down a slight slope toward Sharp Crater and it is an intervening ridge - rather than curvature of the Moon - that is hiding the lower portions of the LM and the S-Band antenna. Note how visible the rocks are because we can see the shadows they cast.
AS12-49-7247 (OF300) ( 160k or 1100k )
Leftward of 7246, centered on the LM.
AS12-49-7248 (OF300) ( 212k or 1200k )
Leftward of 7247.
AS12-49-7249 (OF300) ( 204k or 1200k )
Leftward of 7248, with the LM and the S-Band at the right edge.
AS12-49-7250 (OF300) ( 176k or 1000k )
Leftward of 7249.
AS12-49-7251 (OF300) ( 136k or 852k )
Leftward of 7250.
AS12-49-7252 (OF300) ( 144k or 860k )
Leftward of 7251, showing the view to the north.
AS12-49-7253 (OF300) ( 136k or 824k )
Leftward of 7252, showing the large rock that Pete describes at 132:53:22.
AS12-49-7254 (OF300) ( 108k or 772k )
Leftward of 7253.
AS12-49-7255 (OF300) ( 76k or 656k )
132:53:22 Leftward of 7254, showing the down-Sun view. If Sharp crater is in front of them, it is nearly invisible in this picture.
AS12-49-7256 (OF300) ( 76k or 668k )
Leftward of 7255.
AS12-49-7257 (OF300) ( 76k or 664k )
Leftward of 7256.
AS12-49-7258 (OF300) ( 136k or 836k )
Leftward of 7257.
AS12-49-7259 (OF300) ( 156k or 996k )
Leftward of 7258, toward the south showing a sizable crater short of the horizon and a large crater rim on the horizon.
AS12-49-7260 (OF300) ( 156k or 968k )
Leftward of 7259.
AS12-49-7261 (OF300) ( 180k or 1000k )
Leftward of 7260.
AS12-49-7262 (OF300) ( 172k or 1000k )
132:53:22 This picture ends Pete's pan taken during the traverse from Bench to Sharp. It shows the view just to the right of up-Sun. As with his other pans, Pete has gotten good overlap between frames with virtually no blurring and with good control of the f-stop settings.
AS12-49-7263 (OF300) ( 144k or 932k )
132:56:44 This is the first frame in Pete's partial pan of Sharp Crater. Pete is standing on the eastern rim and this frame shows the north rim and part of the shadowed eastern wall. Sharp is about 12 meters across and has relatively steep sides. A companion stereo pan begins with AS12-49-7270.
AS12-49-7264 (OF300) ( 128k or 876k )
Leftward of 7263.
AS12-49-7265 (OF300) ( 124k or 892k )
Leftward of 7264.
AS12-49-7266 (OF300) ( 108k or 832k )
Leftward of 7265. This down-Sun view is very washed out, in large measure because of (1) the high albedo (reflectivity) of the freshejecta and (2) the steep slope of the far wall.
AS12-49-7267 (OF300) ( 108k or 836k )
Leftward of 7266.
AS12-49-7268 (OF300) ( 116k or 844k )
Leftward of 7267.
AS12-49-7269 (OF300) ( 148k or 944k )
Leftward of 7268. View of the south rim and wall of Sharp Crater. This frame shows that the rim of Sharp is elevated above the surrounding terrain. Fresh craters like Sharp tend to have elevated rims which then, over time, are worn down by the steady rain of small impactors.
AS12-49-7270 (OF300) ( 128k or 812k )
132:57:33 Pete has stepped to his left in order to start a stereo companion pan to 7263-7269. Note the foreground rock that is visible in both this frame and 7269.
AS12-49-7271 (OF300) ( 96k or 720k )
132:57:33 Rightward of 7270. Frame from Pete Conrad's second partial pan of Sharp Crater.
AS12-49-7272 (OF300) ( 92k or 688k )
Rightward of 7271, down-Sun.
AS12-49-7273 (OF300) ( 104k or 720k )
Rightward of 7272.
AS12-49-7274 (OF300) ( 112k or 740k )
Rightward of 7273, showing the central mound.
AS12-49-7275 (OF300) ( 148k or 956k )
Rightward of 7270, completing the second of Pete's stereo pair of partial pans at Sharp Crater.
AS12-49-7276 (OF300) ( 224k or 1100k )
132:58:18 Pete's cross-Sun photo of the gnomon and trench at Sharp Crater is spoiled by Al's shadow. Like all photographers, the astronauts had to learn to be conscious of shadows. Al is taking a down-Sun photo of the trench and needed to be farther east and/or off to one side. Al's down-Sun picture is AS12-48-7067.
AS12-49-7277 (OF300) ( 212k or 1100k )
Stereo companion to 7276
AS12-49-7278 (OF300) ( 124k or 824k )
133:01:00 This superb picture shows Al holding the vacuum-sealed Special Environmental Sample Container (SESC). Photographer Pete Conrad has just poured soil into the container. We can see that it is nearly full. The lid is hanging by a cord from the bottom. This photo gives us a good view of the top of Al's Hasselblad camera and the cuff checklist and watch on his left sleeve. Note also that reflections of Pete and the Hand Tool Carrier are visible in Al's visor. Pete took this photo during the stop at Sharp Crater. It is also cited in the comments at 121:31:45. A discussion of the f-stop decal on the top of Al's film magazine follows 132:59:04. Finally, Al's checklist is open to pages 12 and 13 as can be seen in a detail by Harald Kucharek.
AS12-49-7279 (OF300) ( 196k or 1000k )
133:03:46 This is the first frame of a stereopair of cross-Suns from the north that Pete of the Sharp Crater trench.
AS12-49-7280 (OF300) ( 240k or 1200k )
Stereo companion to 7279.
AS12-49-7281 (OF300) ( 120k or 716k )
133:15:25. See, also, the discussion at 133:04:43 This is Pete's "tourist" picture of Al, with the HTC at his right hand. On the HTC, we can see the "Dixie cup" sample bags and the large sample collection bag that fills the center of the HTC. We can also see a core-tube-cap dispenser.

A detail from AS12-49-7281 shows Al's checklist open to pages 12 and 13 in his EVA-2 checklist. Ulli Lotzmann has provided a photograph of the same two pages taken in Alan's Houston studio.

A second detail shows lettering at the lower right corner(from our perspective) related to the push-to-talk switch, which is out-of-sight on the bottom of the RCU.

AS12-49-7282 (OF300) ( 212k or 1100k )
133:17:16 Pete's cross-Sun from the north.
AS12-49-7283 (OF300) ( 200k or 1000k )
Stereo companion of 7282.
AS12-49-7284 (OF300) ( 260k or 1200k )
133:17:58 Pete has backed up to take this picture of his own footprint because, as is discussed in the transcript, the soil texture at this site is unusual and Pete is documenting it's response to the 60-pound load he put on it by standing on it.
AS12-49-7285 (OF300) ( 236k or 1200k )
133:25:34 Al is placing a core tube in the ground, shoving it as far as he can before he starts to hammer it in to full depth.
AS12-49-7286 (OF300) ( 172k or 916k )
133:25:41 Al is hammering a double core tube at a geology stop near Halo Crater. He has driven in all of the lower section and most of the upper by this time. The crater beyond the core tube is not Halo. Note that Al is using the flat of the hammer. Because of the stiffness of the suit, it is difficult to control the swing and, by using the flat, he is more certain of actually hitting the top of the extension handle. Al is wearing a "saddlebag" on his left hip, with a a pack of flat sample bags attached at the back. Pete probably attached the sample bags at 131:57:24. AS12-49-7213 gives a better view of them.
AS12-49-7287 (OF300) ( 228k or 1100k )
133:28:24 Pete's cross-Sun "after" of the double core
AS12-49-7288 (OF300) ( 252k or 1200k )
Stereo companion to 7287.

Because Al Bean's camera handle has come loose, he borrows Pete's camera loaded with magazine 49. When he finishes magazine 49, he will replace it with the partially exposed magazine 48 that he was using when his own Hasselblad failed.


AS12-49-7289 (OF300) ( 88k or 760k )
133:36:44 Because of the malfunction of his camera, Al is now using Pete's camera and magazine 49. For the moment, Al's camera and magazine 48 have been put in the large sample bag on the HTC. Al is taking a counter-clockwise pan, starting with this down-Sun.
AS12-49-7290 (OF300) ( 124k or 912k )
Leftward of 7289.
AS12-49-7291 (OF300) ( 148k or 988k )
Leftward of 7290.
AS12-49-7292 (OF300) ( 180k or 1100k )
Leftward of 7291, toward the south.
AS12-49-7293 (OF300) ( 196k or 1100k )
Leftward of 7292.
AS12-49-7294 (OF300) ( 196k or 1100k )
Leftward of 7293.
AS12-49-7295 (OF300) ( 160k or 996k )
Leftward of 7294.
AS12-49-7296 (OF300) ( 108k or 928k )
Leftward of 7295.
AS12-49-7297 (OF300) ( 108k or 896k )
Leftward of 7296, up-Sun.
AS12-49-7298 (OF300) ( 112k or 924k )
Leftward of 7297, note the boulders on the near horizon.
AS12-49-7299 (OF300) ( 124k or 944k )
Leftward of 7298.
AS12-49-7300 (OF300) ( 156k or 976k )
Leftward of 7299.
AS12-49-7301 (OF300) ( 168k or 1000k )
Leftward of 7300.
AS12-49-7302 (OF300) ( 156k or 972k )
Leftward of 7301.
AS12-49-7303 (OF300) ( 200k or 1100k )
Leftward of 7302.
AS12-49-7304 (OF300) ( 164k or 1020k )
Leftward of 7303, toward the north. Note that the LM is hidden by the local horizon.
AS12-49-7305 (OF300) ( 160k or 1020k )
Leftward of 7304.
AS12-49-7306 (OF300) ( 128k or 836k )
Leftward of 7305. Pete is wearing his tongs and is carrying his scoop.
AS12-49-7307 (OF300) ( 116k or 836k )
Leftward of 7306, with Pete and the HTC.
AS12-49-7308 (OF300) ( 92k or 744k )
Leftward of 7307.
AS12-49-7309 (OF300) ( 80k or 712k )
Leftward of 7308, down-Sun.
AS12-49-7310 (OF300) ( 84k or 744k )
Leftward of 7309, down-Sun.
AS12-49-7311 (OF300) ( 80k or 728k )
133:36:44 Leftward of 7310, end of pan, down-Sun.
AS12-49-7312 (OF300) ( 240k or 1200k )
133:38:37 Pete has just collected a sample and is holding the scoop just above the spot so that Al can take a documentation photo. Ideally, the crew was to have taken a "before" picture of the sample to show its pristine condition and an "after" to show which of the rocks in the before scene was the one actually collected. At the very least, this photo gives a view of the rock so that, in the event that it becomes separated from its sample bag, it can still be identified. Remarkably, this rock seems not to have made it back to Earth. One possibility is that it fell out of the HTC, unnoticed, while Pete and Al were rummaging among the samples starting at 134:00.
AS12-49-7313 (OF300) ( 212k or 1100k )
133:41:13 Al's Down-Sun "before" of a sample site showing the gnomon and Pete's boots, hands, and scoop. Note how dirty Pete's gloves have become.
AS12-49-7314 (OF300) ( 256k or 1300k )
Cross-Sun companion to 7313.
AS12-49-7315 (OF300) ( 252k or 1200k )
133:41:25 Cross-Sun companion to 7313 with much better exposure than 7314. It is a good portrait of the gnomon, with the HTC in the background. Note the core tubes which are affixed horizontally to the near face of the HTC.
AS12-49-7316 (OF300) ( 108k or 800k )
133:42:42 Overexposed view of the LM from the southwestern rim of Surveyor Crater.
AS12-49-7317 (OF300) ( 144k or 964k )
133:42:42 Well-exposed view of the LM from the southwestern rim of Surveyor Crater. Note the rearward tilt of the spacecraft. On-board measurements indicated that the spacecraft was pitched up (backwards) by 3 degrees and was rolled left (toward the camera in this picture) by 3.8 degrees. Note the heavily footprinted area southeast of the spacecraft where Pete took the 8 o'clock pan at 116:26:05. He may have also made the tracks leading a bit farther into the crater at about the same time. See a detail.
AS12-49-7318 (OF300) ( 196k or 1100k )
133:43:37 Al took this picture of Pete from the north during a stop at the south rim of Surveyor Crater. Note the large blocks that have been dug up by the small impact at Pete's right. The Hand Tool Carrier (HTC) is forward of his left foot. He is holding a scoop in his right hand and the gnomon is on the ground in front of his right foot. Ulli Lotzmann has created anaglyphs from 7318 and 7319.
AS12-49-7318/9 Red-Blue Anaglyph ( 1.2 Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph by Kevin Frank.
AS12-49-7319 (OF300) ( 208k or 1100k )
133:43:37 Al took this picture of Pete from the north during a stop at the south rim of Surveyor Crater. Note the large blocks that have been dug up by the small impact at Pete's right. The Hand Tool Carrier (HTC) is forward of his left foot. He is holding a scoop in his right hand and the gnomon is on the ground in front of his right foot.
AS12-49-7320 (OF300) ( 220k or 1100k )
133:45:09 This may be an up-Sun "after" of the sample that went in sample bag 14D. It shows some detail on the HTC and shows the accumulation of dust on Pete's hoses.
AS12-49-7321 (OF300) ( 112k or 992k )
133:45:36 Al has started a partial pan of Surveyor Crater in order to finish off magazine 49 before replacing it with magazine 48. This first photo was shot virtually up-Sun but does show the southeastern portion of the crater, with Surveyor III all but lost in the glare.
AS12-49-7322 (OF300) ( 128k or 968k )
Leftward of 7321, still with considerable glare.
AS12-49-7323 (OF300) ( 108k or 1008k )
Leftward of 7322, sunstruck.
AS12-49-7324 (OF300) ( 148k or 1000k )
133:45:36 and 133:46:44 Leftward of 7323, showing Surveyor III, now in full sunlight.

Magazine 50/Q (Color) Frames 7325-7459

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.


AS12-50-7325 ( 180k or 496k )
This photo was taken not long after translunar injection and is centered on the Gulf Of Mexico near New Orleans. East is at the upper right and north is at the upper left. The Yucatan Pennisula is in the lower right part of the image. Scan by Kipp Teague.
AS12-50-7326 ( 128k or 353k )
This photo shows the Spacecraft-LM Adapter (SLA) above center. Baja Califonia is on the right side of the image and the Yucatan Penninsula is at bottom center. Scans by Kipp Teague.
AS12-50-7369 ( 128k or 449k )
According to National Space Science Data Center document NSSDC-70-11 (July 1970), this photo shows the 'fouled hatch window; streaks go (left) away from the CMS cone (right)'. This photo was taken inside the Command Module during the translunar coast. Scans by Kipp Teague.
AS12-50-7374 ( 85k or 462k )
View of the LM docking target. This photo was taken inside the Command Module during the translunar coast.

Magazine 51/R (Color) Frames 7460-7588

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

AS12-51-7501 ( 161k or 1032k )

The Apollo 12 Lunar Module, in lunar landing configuration, is photographed in lunar orbit from the Command and Service Modules. Herschel Crater is just to the right of the LM. 19 November 1969. See, also, a labeled version ( 3.4 Mb ) by René Cantin.
AS12-51-7507 ( 122k or 635k )
Intrepid prior to the descent. The coordinates of the center of the lunar surface shown in picture are 4.5 degrees west longitude and 7 degrees south latitude. The largest crater in the foreground is Ptolemaeus; and the second largest is Herschel. 19 November 1969.
Intrepid Thru the Yankee Clipper Sextant ( 22k )
Dick Gordon spotted both the LM and Surveyor III on the surface, using the Command Module sextant during his pass over the landing site at 114:22:28. At Houston's suggestion, he used the DAC to film his next pass and this is a frame from that film sequence. At that time, the solar elevation was about 8.1 degrees and the LM sahdow about 160 feet. Ulli Lotzmann provided the frame and a labeled version.

Magazine 52/S (B & W) Frames 7589-7762

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

AS12-52-7597 ( 2.1 Mb )

Fra Mauro landing site (upper right) from lunar orbit. Cone Crater is labelled in a detail. Scan courtesy Jody Russell, NASA Johnson.
AS12-52-7739 ( 124k )
Crater Copernicus viewed from lunar orbit. Scan by Kipp Teague.
AS12-52-7745 ( 128k or 692k )
View of Kepler Crater from lunar orbit. See, also, a labeled version ( 3.2 Mb ) by René Cantin.
AS12-52-7757 ( 144k or 761k )
View of Marius Crater from lunar orbit. See, also, a labeled version ( 1.6 Mb ) by René Cantin.

Magazine 54/T (B & W) Frames 7948-8120

Unless otherwise noted, all images processed by Kipp Teague from raw scans provided by NASA Johnson. Images labeled "OF300" are from the original film and are presented at the equivalent of 300 DPI on an 7.5 inch by 7.5 inch reproduction.
Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

AS12-52-7957 ( 1.7 Mb )

Long.114 E; Lat. 5.5 S. Crater Vesalius M on the right. Scan courtesy Jody Russell, NASA Johnson.
AS12-54-8084 ( 1.4 Mb )
Long. 3.5 S; Lat. 17 W. Fra Mauro landing site viewed from lunar orbit. Scan courtesy Jody Russell, NASA Johnson.
AS12-54-8085 ( 1.6 Mb )
Long. 3 S; Lat. 18 W. Fra Mauro landing site viewed from lunar orbit. Scan courtesy Jody Russell, NASA Johnson.

Magazine 57/FF (B & W) Frames 8441-8455

Ed Hengeveld has provided a set of thumbnails images ( 1 Mb ) made from low-resolution scans provided by Glen Swanson of NASA Johnson.

Magazine 47 was used in the Apollo Lunar Surface Closeup (Gold) Camera. The area shown in each images is 72 mm by 83 mm.

Anaglyphs created by Erwin D'Hoore from scans found on the website of the Lunar and Planetary Institute.


AS12-57-8441 ( 1.9Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-57-8442 ( 1.9Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-57-8443 ( 1.9Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-57-8444 ( 1.9Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-57-8445 ( 1.7Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-57-8446 ( 2.0Mb )
Many of the zap pits are surround by light-colored halos, which Jack Schmitt says represents a region where plagioclase crystals have been shattered. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-57-8447 ( 1.9Mb )
Impression left in the soil by a lunar boot. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-57-8448 ( 1.9Mb )
Impression left in the soil by a lunar boot. Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-57-8449 ( 2.0Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-57-8450 ( 1.9Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-57-8451 ( 2.1Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-57-8452 ( 2.0Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-57-8453 ( 2.0Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-57-8454 ( 1.6Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.
AS12-57-8455 ( 1.9Mb )
Red-blue anaglyph created by Erwin D'Hoore.

Post-Flight Photos

S69-22265 ( 135k )
A Navy diver helps Al Bean into the recovery raft. Pete Conrad is at the far right and Dick Gordon is at the center. Note the diver in the water to the left of the raft taking pictures. Photographs are also being taken from the helicopter. 24 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-22271 ( 170k )
Al Bean (foreground) joins Dick Gordon (immediately behind Al), and Pete Conrad (shaking Al's hand) in the recovery raft. Pete appears to have Dick's right hand while Dick's left hand is on Al's elbow, perhaps to steady Al. 24 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1895 ( 179k or 1286k )
Pete Conrad (left), Dick Gordon, U.S. Navy pararescueman Lt. (J.G.) Ernest Lee Jahncke, III, and Al Bean in the recovery raft. Jahncke is signalling the recovery helicopter. 24 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-22185 ( 181k )
Apollo 12 CM is hoisted aboard the U.S.S. Hornet. 24 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-726 ( 118k )
Apollo 12 CM is hoisted aboard the U.S.S. Hornet. 24 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-22849 ( 151k or 815k )
Apollo 12 crew walks to the quarantine van. 24 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
KSC-69PC-742 ( 142k )
Apollo 12 crew walks to the quarantine van. 24 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1885 ( 128k or 984k )
Apollo 12 crewmembers walk from the recovery helicopter to the quarantine van. 24 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1886 ( 105k or 794k )
Pete Conrad (left), Dick Gordon, and Al Bean in the quarantine van. 24 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-60760 ( 188k )
Apollo 12 crew in the quarantine van. 24 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
S69-22876 ( 167k or 1041k )
Rear Admiral Donald C. David, Commander, Manned Spacecraft Recovery Force, Pacific, welcomes the crew of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission aboard the U.S.S. Hornet. 24 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
USS Hornet Patch ( 25k )
This patch was used on-board the recovery carrier during Apollo 12. Provided by John Berry, a Honeysuckle Creek Apollo veteran. Scan by John Berry.
69-H-1884 ( 125k or 1173k )
Pete Conrad (left), Dick Gordon, and Al Bean speak with President Nixon by phone from the quarantine van during welcoming ceremonies aboard the Hornet. 26 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1763 ( 118k or 1209k )
Dick Gordon (left), Al Bean, and Pete Conrad debrief in the quarantine van aboard the Hornet. 26 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1765 ( 96k or 984k )
Dick Gordon during a debriefing in the quarantine van aboard the Hornet. 26 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1764 ( 127k or 1073k )
Pete Conrad (left), Dick Gordon, and Al Bean at the window of the quarantine van aboard the Hornet. They have just performed an equator-crossing ceremony on Gordon, who has his uniform backwards for the occasion. 27 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
69-H-1766 ( 117k or 1078k )
Pete Conrad (left), Dick Gordon, and Al Bean at the window of the quarantine van aboard the Hornet. They have just performed an equator-crossing ceremony on Gordon, who has his uniform backwards for the occasion. 27 November 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld.
Birmingham (AL) Reception ( 87k )
Al Bean (left), Dick Gordon, and Pete Conrad at a post-flight reception in Birmingham, Alabama. 8 January 1970. Scan by Ulrich Lotzmann.
Surveyor 3 Camera ( 155k )
Inspection of the Surveryor 3 camera at Hughes Aircraft Company. April 1970. Scan by J.L. Pickering.
"Dixie Cup" Sample bags and dispenser ( 451k )
This type of sample bag was flown on both Apollo 12 and Apollo 14. The dispenser was attached to the HTC. Photo of Astronaut Hall of Fame display and scan courtesy Ulrich Lotzmann. 2002.
Fragment of Unexposed Film from the A12 Stereo Camera ( 88k )
Phill Parker writes, "Here is the image of the Apollo-12 stereo camera film strip I have in my collection. These strips are probably the 'easiest' film items to collect from Apollo . They do not come up very often but there are several of them 'out there'." Note that, John W. Holland, the person who authenticated the fragment, mistakenly calls the Apollo 12 Lunar Module 'Yankee Clipper'. Sigh.
Apollo 12 Geology Scoop ( 125k )
Photograph taken at the Astronaut Hall of Fame, Titusville, Florida in 2004 by Ulrich Lotzmann. Apollo 12 photograph AS12-49-7312 shows Pete using the scoop near Halo Crater at about 133:38:37. The scoop was fitted into an extension handle. A detail from 7312 shows the extent of the scoop. A labeled detail shows the location of a defect/blemish on the scoop as displayed in 2004 and what appears to be the same feature on the scoop in 7312.

Samples

Sample 12017, S70-44098 ( 2.2 Mb)

Post-flight view of 12017 taken in the Lunar Receiving Lab. This is a 53-gram piece of glass-splattered basalt that Al noticed at the ALSEP site at 118:01:47.
Sample 12025, S69-23807 ( 47k)
A close-up view of Apollo 12 lunar sample no. 12025, called Core Sample 1, collected on the lunar surface, about 225 meters below the point where the Apollo 12 LM touched down. This core sample and others collected on the Apollo 12 mission differ from those collected by the Apollo 11 crewmen in the Sea of Tranquility in that the Apollo 12 core samples have easily recognizable stratigraphy and two coherent crust-like layers. This sample has dominantly fine-grained texture.
Sample 12052, S70-44633 ( 44k)
Sample 12052 is a 1.9 kilogram piece of olivine basalt that Al noticed at 132:33:20 during the run from Head Crater to Bench Crater. Scan courtesy Harald Kucharek.
Sample 12054, S69-62793 (1.4 Mb)
Collected at Halo Crater and described in the Preliminary Science Report as a "Shatter cone with glass splash-dolerite". Shatter cones are produced in impacts and this one has probably been thrown onto this spot by a remote impact, perhaps the big one 4 kilometers to the west. The glass splatter coating the lower right part of the sample was probably the result of a much later, nearby impact. The rest of the sample is light-colored and lacks a glass coatingnot glass-coated because it was "below the soil line and was protected from the glass splach." Sample 12057.27, S69-20954 ( 88k)
An idea of the mineralogy and texture of a lunar sample can be achieved by use of color microphotos. This thin section is Apollo 12 lunar sample number 12057.27, under polarized light. The lavender minerals are pyroxene; the black mineral is ilmenite; the white and brown, feldspar; and the remainder, olivine.
Sample 12065, S69-60580 ( 33k)
Close-up view of Apollo 12 sample 12065 under observation in the Manned Spacecraft Center's Lunar Receiving Laboratory. This sample, collected during the second Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA-2) of astronauts Pete Conrad, and Al Bean, is a fine-grained rock. Note the glass-lined pits. An idea of the size of the rock can be gained by reference to the gauge on the bottom portion of the number meter.

As indicated in the Apollo 12 Preliminary Science Report, this sample may be the grapefruit-sized rock that Pete mentioned at 132:03:46. Sample 12065 is a 2.1 kg 'pigeonite porphyry, consisting of plagioclase, pigeonite, and ilmenite' that was returned in the totebag. NASA photo S70-20963 shows a thin section. Scan courtesy Harald Kucharek.

S69-60354 ( 39k )
A scientist's gloved hand holds one of the numerous rock samples brought back to Earth from the Apollo 12 mission. This sample is a highly shattered basaltic rock with a thin black-glass coating on five of its six sides. Glass fills fractures and cements the rock together. The rock appears to have been shattered and thrown out by a meteorite impact explosion and coated with molten rock material before the rock fell to the surface.

 

Miscellaneous Images

S69-53326 ( 38k )

Close-up view of a replica of the plaque which the Apollo 12 astronauts left on the Moon in commemoration of their flight. The plaque was attached to the ladder on a landing gear strut of the Descent Stage of the Apollo 12 Lunar Module, Intrepid.
S69-54148 ( 48k )
This photo shows Pete Conrad and Al Bean practicing sampling procedures in the Flight Crew Training Building at the Kennedy Space Center. The object in the foreground is a gnomon. The free-swinging vertical element provides a local vertical and a length scale. The flight gnomon had a color/gray-scale on one leg, which the crew oriented toward the Sun. The Hand Tool Carrier (HTC) is between the astronauts. Both Pete and Al are wearing a 70-mm Hasselblad camera mounted on their Remote Control Units (RCUs). On the Moon, one of them would take a "before" documentation photo from the east (up-Sun) and the other would take a "cross-Sun" stereopair from the north or south, stepping sideways between frames. Pete has a pair of long-handled tongs in his left hand and will use them to collect a rock.
S69-55362 ( 46k )
In this photo, Al is practicing driving a core tube into the lunar surface. The core tube is mounted on the bottom of a re-inforced Extension Handle so that Al can hit the top of the extension handle and drive the core tube all the way into the ground without having to bend over very far. Note that he is hitting the extension handle with the flat side of the hammer. The pressurized suit makes it difficult to deliver an accurate blow and, by using the flat of the hammer, he increases his chances of making contact. Each of the astronauts has two visors in his Lunar Extravehicular Visor Assembly (LEVA) that covers the bubble helmet. The inner visor reduces the light level reaching the astronaut's eyes while the outer visor, which is electroplated with gold, provides UV protection. We can see the edges of both of Pete's visors. Note, also, the cuff checklist on Pete's left wrist. There is a LM mock-up in the background. We are looking at the side of the spacecraft and, behind Al, we can see the open area from which the MESA (hidden from view) has been deployed.
S69-55662 ( 74k )
During a geology training exercise at Cinder Lake crater field near Sunset Crater, Arizona, Pete Conrad examines the stratigraphy in a crater dug by the USGS with an explosive charge in thick blanket of volcanic ash. 10 October 1969
S69-56058 ( 28k )
Astronaut Pete Conrad sits in the cockpit of a Lunar Landing Training Vehicle (LLTV) during a lunar simulation flight at Ellington Air Force Base. The LLTV is used to train Apollo crews in lunar landing techniques.
S69-56059 ( 0.4 Mb or 1.5 Mb )
Astronaut Al Bean participates in lunar surface simulation training in Bldg 29 at the Manned Spacecraft Center. He is strapped into a device called the POGO which supports 5/6th of his weight. The POGO assembly is suspended from a centrifuge arm so that Bean can run around the outer edge of the centrifuge chamber on a simulated lunar surface. The astronauts who used the facility in this way described it as a useful simulation. 24-25 October 1969. Scan courtesy Susan Erskine at NASA Johnson.
AS12-51-7478 ( 33k )
View of the lunar surface from low orbit.
S69-59547 ( 28k )
The seismometer reading from the impact made by the LM Ascent Stage when it struck the lunar surface. The impact was registered by the Passive Seismic Experiment Package (PSEP) which was deployed on the Moon by the Apollo 12 astronauts. The LM's Ascent Stage was jettisoned and sent toward impact on the Moon after astronauts Pete Conrad and Al Bean returned to lunar orbit and rejoined astronaut Dick Gordon, in the Command/Service Modules.
AS12-57-8448 ( 76k or 216k )
Apollo 12 stereo view showing a boot imprint. The exposure was made with an Apollo 35mm stereo close-up camera during extravehicular activity of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission. The camera was developed to get the highest possible resolution of a small area. Scan by Kipp Teague. Ulli Lotzmann has produced red(left)-blue(right) and green(left)-red(right) stereo-images.
AS12-57-8452 ( 34k )
Apollo 12 stereo views showing a three-inch square of the lunar surface. Ulli Lotzmann has produced red(left)-blue(right) and green(left)-red(right) stereo-images.
AS12-57-8455 ( 38k )
Apollo 12 stereo views showing a three-inch square of the lunar surface. Ulli Lotzmann has produced red(left)-blue(right) and green(left)-red(right) stereo-images.
Apollo 12 Rock box ( 84k )
One of the Apollo 12 Sample Return Containers, probably 1008, is on display at the Smithsonian's National Air and space Museum in Washington D.C. Photo by Ulrich Lotzmann.
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