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Corrected Transcript and Commentary Copyright © 1995 by Eric M. Jones.
All rights reserved.
Last revised 11 May 2006.

Apollo 14 Crew Portrait


Mission Commander

Alan Bartlett Shepard, Captain, USN

Shepard LLTV

NASA photo S70-56287 shows Al standing beside the Lunar Landing Training Vehicle.

Personal: Born November 18, 1923, East Derry, New Hampshire.
Married, two children. Education: B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, 1944.
Spaceflights: Pilot, Mercury-Redstone 3 (1961). Commander, Apollo 14 (1971).

Was chosen with the first group of astronauts in 1959. Was pilot of Mercury-Redstone 3 (Freedom 7) (first American in space), and was backup pilot for Mercury-Atlas 9. Was subsequently grounded due to an inner ear ailment until May 7, 1969 (during which time he served as chief of the Astronaut Office). Commanded Apollo 14 (fifth man to walk on the Moon), and in June 1971 resumed duties as chief of the Astronaut Office. Retired from NASA and the Navy on August 1, 1974, with the rank of Rear Admiral, to join the Marathon Construction Company of Houston, Texas, as partner and chairman. Later, President, Seven/Fourteen Enterprises, Houston.

Alan Shepard died on July 21, 1998 after a long battle with leukemia.


In Memorium
by Mauro Freschi.


Command Module Pilot

Stuart Allen Roosa, Major, USAF

Roosa portrait

Stu's formal Crewmember Portrait

Personal: Born August 15, 1933, Durango, Colorado. Married, four children.
Education: B.S. in aeronautical engineering, University of Colorado, 1960.
Spaceflights: Command module pilot, Apollo 14 (1971).

Chosen with the fifth group of astronauts in 1966. Was the command module pilot of Apollo 14, and backup command module pilot for Apollo 16 and Apollo 17. Retired from the Air Force with the rank of Colonel. Resigned from NASA on February 1, 1976 to become Vice President for International Affairs, U.S. Industries Middle East Development Company, based in Athens, Greece. Returned to the United States in 1977 to become President of Jet Industries in Austin, Texas. Later worked in private business in Austin and was owner and President, Gulf Coast Coors, Inc., Gulfport, Mississippi. Stu Roosa died on December 12, 1994 of complications from pancreatitis. He is buried at Arlington National Cemetary ( 235k ). Photo courtesy Russell C. Jacobs, March 2006.


Lunar Module Pilot

Edgar Dean Mitchell, Commander, USN

Mitchell portrait

Ed's formal Crewmember Portrait

Personal: Born September 17, 1930, Hereford, Texas. Married, two children (by a previous marriage).
Education: B.S. in industrial management, Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1952. B.S. in aeronautical engineering, U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, 1961. Ph.D., aeronautics and astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1964.
Spaceflights: Lunar module pilot, Apollo 14 (1971).

Chosen with the fifth group of astronauts in 1966. Was backup lunar module pilot for Apollo 10, lunar module pilot for Apollo 14 (sixth man to walk on the Moon), and backup lunar module pilot for Apollo 16. Retired from the Navy, with the rank of Captain, and from NASA in October 1972 and founded the Institute of Noetic Sciences in Palo Alto, California, of which he is chairman. Was President, Edgar Mitchell Corporation (EMCO), Palm Beach, Florida from 1974 until 1978. Later became Chairman of Mitchell Communications Company in Florida. Wrote a book entitled Psychic Exploration: A Challenge for Science.


Landing and EVA-2 CapCom

Fred Wallace Haise, civilian

Haise portrait

Fred during geology training for Apollo 13 Personal: Born November 14, 1933, Biloxi, Mississippi.
Married, four children (by a previous marriage).
Education: B.S. in aeronautical engineering, University of Oklahoma, 1959.
Spaceflights: Lunar module pilot, Apollo 13 (1970).

Served as an aviator in both the U.S Marine Corps and the U.S. Air Force, and was chosen in the fifth group of astronauts in 1966. Was backup lunar module pilot for Apollo 8 and Apollo 11, lunar module pilot for Apollo 13, and backup commander for Apollo 16. Served as Landing and EVA-2 CapCom for Apollo 14. Commanded one of the two crews that flew shuttle approach and landing tests. Had been selected as commander of one of the four shuttle orbital flight tests, but resigned from NASA on June 29, 1979 and became President of the Technical Services Division, Grumman Corp., Titusville, Florida and of Northrop Worldwide Aircraft Services, Lawton, Oklahoma.


EVA-1 and LM Launch CapCom

Capt. Bruce McCandless, II, USN (Retired)

McCandless portrait

Bruce's portrait in his Manned MMManeuvering Unit (MMU), before his historic STS 41-B Mission in 1984.

Personal: Born June 8, 1937, Boston, Massachusetts. Married, two children.
Education: B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, 1958. M.S. in electrical engineering, Stanford University, 1965. M.B.A., University of Houston at Clear Lake, 1987.
Spaceflights: Mission specialist, STS 41-B (1984) and STS-31 (1990).

Chosen with the fifth group of astronauts in 1966. Served as EVA CapCom on Apollo 11 and EVA-1 and LM Launch CapCom Apollo 14. Was backup pilot for Skylab 2 and a mission specialist on STS 41-B and on STS-31, which deployed the Hubble Space Telescope. After retiring from NASA and the Navy in 1990, he worked at Martin Marietta Astronautics Co., Denver, Colorado.


Goodnight and Wake-up CapCom

Col. C. Gordon Fullerton, USAF

Fullerton portrait

Gordo's official portrait for the Space Shuttle Approach and Landing test program.

Fullerton was born October 11, 1936 in Rochester, New York; and, while a classmate of Jack Schmitt's at the California Institute of Technology, trained as an engineer . He received a M.S. in Mechanical Engineering in 1958. After graduation from the USAF Aerospace Research Pilot School at Edwards AFB in 1965, Fullerton was serving as a test pilot for the bomber operations division at Wright-Patterson AFB when he was selected into the U.S. Air Force's Manned Orbiting Laboratory (MOL) Program. When that program was canceled in 1969, Fullerton and others transferred to NASA. Fullerton was a member of the Apollo 14 and 17 support crews, serving as the Goodnight and Wake-up CapCom on Apollo 14 and the lunar landing and lift-off CapCom on Apollo 17. Subsequently, he joined the Shuttle program and was one of four astronauts who flew Approach and Landing Tests in 1977. In March 1982, he flew as Pilot on the third Shuttle mission (STS-3) and, with Commander Jack Lousma, performed the first - and, thus far, only - Shuttle landing at White Sands, New Mexico when poor weather had closed the dry-lake runways at Edwards. In July 1985, Fullerton commanded the 19th Shuttle flight, STS-51F. In November 1986, Fullerton left the astronaut corps and joined the Research Pilot Office at the Dryden Flight Reseach Center. He retired from the U.S. Air Force in 1988 as a Colonel but continued at Dryden as a civilian pilot. He was still flying as a project pilot for a number of programs in January 2003.


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