Apollo 10 Digital Picture Library

Corrected Transcript Copyright © 1995 by Eric M. Jones.
All rights reserved.
Last revised 30 January 2012.


Apollo 10 Photography Index, 70-mm and 16-mm Frame Index ( 9.2 Mb PDF )


69-H-574 ( 142k or 864k )

Tom Stafford (center), Gene Cernan (behind Stafford to the left), and John Young (left foreground) examine emergency escape equipment at Complex 39A. Image filed 27 March 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld
69-H-575 ( 141k or 921k )
Tom Stafford (foreground), John Young (left center), and Gene Cernan (back left) examine emergency escape equipment at Complex 39A. Image filed 27 March 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld
69-H-576 ( 137k or 1.0 Mb )
Apollo 10 crew in the underground shelter below launch pad 39B. Stafford is at the center with John Young behind him on the left and Gene Cernan to the right. Image filed 27 March 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld
69-H-650 ( 143k or 1.2 Mb )
Gene Cernan (left) and Tom Stafford in the LM simulator. Image filed 3 April 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld
69-H-651 ( 122k or 0.8 Mb )
John Young in the Command Module simulator. Image filed 17 April 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld
69-H-652 ( 138k or 1.4 Mb )
John Young in the Command Module simulator. Image filed 17 April 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld
69-H-653 ( 121k or 1.1 Mb )
Gene Cernan prepares to enter the Lunar Module simulator. Note the Snoopy mascot above the door. Image filed 17 April 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld
S69-32037 ( 140k )
The Apollo 10 Lunar Module was nicknamed "Snoopy", after the character in the Charles Schulz comic strip "Peanuts". Here, we see LMP Gene Cernan at a 26 April 1969 news conference next to a Snoopy puppet.
S69-32613 ( 100k )
Apollo 10 crew portrait with LMP Gene Cernan at the left, CDR Tom Stafford in the center, and CMP John Young on the right. This was the first all-veteran crew to have flown a U.S. space mission.
69-H-758 ( 128k or 1.0 Mb )
John Young (left) and Tom Stafford head for the elevator and the transfer van which will take Gene Cernan and them out to the pad for the Countdown Demonstration Test. Image filed 6 May 1969. Scan by Ed Hengeveld
S69-34145 ( 104k )
Apollo 10 liftoff. Scan by Kipp Teague.
AS10-27-3888 (306k )
Earthrise from lunar orbit. Possibly the first after Lunar Orbit Insertion (LOI). The first Apollo 10 Earthrise was at about GET 76 hr 24 min or 2113 UTC/GMT on 21 May 1969. A starry Night view of earth from 100 km above the lunar equator at longitude 105 E, gives a reasonably good match with Greenland recognizable in 3888 just above the terminator on the right. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS10-27-3889 (310k )
Earthrise from lunar orbit. Possibly the first after Lunar Orbit Insertion (LOI). Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS10-27-3890 (330k )
Earthrise from lunar orbit. Possibly the first after Lunar Orbit Insertion (LOI). Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS10-28-3988 (0.8 Mb )
Command Module Mylar outside the front window. In preparation for a photographic pass over the planned Apollo 11 landing site, the crew re-oriented the Command Module while over the backside of the Moon. After regaining contact with Earth, John Young mentioned at 118:41:31 "This morning when we were turning around, first time, we had (means 'could see') about - I estimate maybe a foot-and-a-half or more of Mylar with that insulation coating on the back of it. It would appear out in front of our window, and I guess it was from the top hatch which is where that insulation came from in the first place. It Just sort of sat there for a while, and then quietly floated off. But my question is, will this cause us any thermal problems?" The strangely-shaped 'blob' in this image is almost certainly that piece of Mylar, possibly out-of-focus. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS10-28-3989 (1.4 Mb )
Similar to 3988. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS10-28-3990 (0.9 Mb )
Similar to 3988. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS10-28-3991 (3.5 Mb )
Longitude 149.0 E, Latitude 4.2 S. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS10-28-3992 (4.2 Mb )
Longitude 141.2 E, Latitude 4.4 S. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS10-28-3993 (2.7 Mb )
Longitude 148.8 E, Latitude 1.8 S. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS10-29-4254 (174k )
Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS10-29-4324 (232k )
Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS10-30-4365 (187k )
Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS10-30-4437 (168k )
Mount Marilyn, named for Jim Lovell's wife, is the large feature below and to the right of center. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS10-31-4521 (221k )
Vertical view of Mount Marilyn. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.
AS10-32-4731 (1.6 Mb )
Showing Ritter and Sabine craters, west of the Apollo 11 landing site. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.


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