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Day 2: Quiet end to the day Journal Home Page Day 3: TV Show

Apollo 12

Day 3: Day of the Tuna Fish

Corrected Transcript and Commentary Copyright © 2004 by W. David Woods and Lennox J. Waugh. All rights reserved.
Last updated 2013-03-28

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control at 43 hours, 38 minutes. We have not heard from the crew since Conrad announced about 30 minutes ago that they were going to be in their 10-hour rest period. The spacecraft velocity now is 3,355 feet per second and altitude 144,801 nautical miles. The Guidance and Control Officer reported a short while ago that the spacecraft is maintaining good stable Passive Thermal Control attitude rotating at the rate of about 2 revolutions per hour to maintain the proper temperature control during the time the crew are asleep. This sleep period is scheduled to end at about 3:30 this afternoon. At 43 hours, 39 minutes this is Apollo Control, Houston."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control at 44 hours, 18 minutes, Apollo 12 presently 146,029 nautical miles from Earth. Spacecraft velocity continuing to drop off slowly, now down to 3,317 feet per second. The flight surgeon reported that the crew appears to be settling down and getting to sleep at this time. They are about 1 hour into their scheduled 10-hour rest period. All spacecraft systems continue to function normally at this time. At 44 hours, 19 minutes, this is Apollo Control, Houston."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control at 45 hours, l8 minutes. It's been a little over 2 hours now since Pete Conrad advised that the crew would be beginning their 10 hours sleep period. The flight surgeon reported about an hour ago that the 2 crewmen on whom we have biological data, Conrad and Bean, appeared to be getting to sleep at that time. Apollo 12 is now traveling at a speed of 3,257 feet per second and the altitude continuing to increase gradually, 147,977 nautical miles from Earth. All spacecraft systems are functioning normally at this time. It's been a very quiet night. We do not expect to hear from the crew until about 3:30 this afternoon Central Standard Time. At 45 hours, 19 minutes, this is Apollo Control, Houston."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control at 46 hours, 18 minutes. The Apollo 12 crew is asleep. There is 6 hours, 41 minutes remaining in this rest period. Apollo 12 is 149,827 nautical miles from Earth; velocity is 3,200 feet per second. System performance continues to be normal. This is Mission Control Houston at 46 hours, 18 minutes."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control at 47 hours, 18 minutes. Systems performance continues normal, Apollo 12, as the crew continues in its sleep period. 5 hours, 41 minutes remaining in that rest period. Apollo 12 is now 151,654 nautical miles from Earth traveling at a velocity of 3,144 feet per second. This is Mission Control Houston at 47 hours, 18 minutes."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control at 48 hours, 18 minutes into the mission. Apollo 12 is 153,414 nautical miles from Earth, traveling at a velocity of 3,091 feet per second. All spacecraft systems continue normal, and 4 hours, 41 minutes remaining in the crew's sleep period. This is Mission Control Houston at 48 hours, 18 minutes."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control at 49 hours, 18 minutes. Apollo 12 is 155,198 nautical miles from Earth. Its velocity 3,037 feet per second. Three hours and 41 minutes remain in the sleep period for the Apollo 12 crew. All systems continuing to operate normally. We are showing a total weight in space of 96,218 pounds. This is Mission Control, Houston, at 49 hours, 18 minutes."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control at 50 hours, 18 minutes. Apollo 12 is 156,922 nautical miles from Earth. Velocity 2,986 feet per second. Two hours and 41 minutes remaining in Apollo 12 crew's sleep period. Flight Dynamics Officer reports after studying all the tracking information that Midcourse Correction number 3 will not be required. To repeat, we do not intend to perform Midcourse Correction number 3. This is Mission Control, Houston, at 50 hours, 18 minutes into the Mission of Apollo 12."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control at 51 hours, 18 minutes. One hour, 41 minutes remaining in Apollo 12 crew's sleep period. Apollo 12 Spacecraft is 158,627 nautical miles from Earth. Velocity is 2,935 feet per second. This is Mission Control, Houston at 51 hours, 18 minutes."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control at 52 hours, 18 minutes. We're 41 minutes away from crew wake up time. Apollo 12 is 160,294 nautical miles from Earth, velocity 2,886 feet per second. All systems performance still normal. This is Mission Control, Houston."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control at 52 hours, 56 minutes. CapCom Paul Weitz is getting ready to put in a call to the crew now."

[“Reveille” being played]
052:56:33 Conrad: Good morning, good morning.

052:56:34 Weitz: Good morning, Pete. [Pause.]

052:56:45 Conrad: We're just getting stirring up here, and we'll be with you in a few minutes.

052:56:51 Weitz: okay.

[Long comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "Apollo 12 is 161,436 nautical miles from the Earth; velocity 2,852 feet per second. We'll continue to standby for air to ground conversation after the crew gets a little bit organized."

053:02:27 Conrad: Houston, 12. We're ready for the consumables update.

053:02:33 Weitz: Okay, 12. Your consumables update for GET of 53 hours. RCS total is 80.2 - for information, Pete, that puts you 95 - that's 95 pounds below the how goes it. Reading Alfa through Delta 77.5, 82.4, 78.5, 82.5. Your hydrogen is at 80.6/78.8. Oxygen is 81.0/80.7. Over. [Long pause.]

053:03:24 Conrad: Copy. [Long pause.]

053:03:42 Weitz: 12, Houston. No update to the Flight Plan this morning.

053:03:50 Conrad: Okay. [Long pause.]

053:04:47 Conrad: And, Houston, on the crew status report, the CDR slept approximately 8 hours, CMP approximately 9, LMP approximately 8. PRD readings for the CDR, 11010; CMP, 11009; LMP, 04010.

053:05:09 Weitz: Roger 12.Copy.

[ Music - "First Call To Formation" (trumpet) ]
[Comm break.]
053:07:37 Conrad: Everybody's at attention in here.[Long pause.]

053:08:00 Weitz: 12, Houston. Let me know when you're settled in the breakfast nook, and I'll give you your morning news.

053:08:08 Conrad: Okay. We'll be with you in a minute.

[Long comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "The CapCom is Astronaut Paul Weitz."

053:12:04 Conrad: Hello, Houston, 12. We're ready for the news now.

053:12:09 Weitz: Okay, 12. The news reports on the flight of Apollo 12 are highlighting yesterday's midcourse correction and the fact that the flight is moving along smoothly. One wire service story calls attention to the improvement in the food menu on this flight. Local, as well as network stations, played video taped highlights of your television show yesterday. Prayers for the flight's success were said in churches everywhere. In Houston, Mayor Louie Welch won his fourth consecutive term by defeating five candidates. He won 53 percent of the vote. His nearest opponent was Curtis Graves, who received about 31 percent of the vote. A minimum housing code and a freedom-of-choice integration plan won strong support. That's about it for news. A recap of how the top 10 teams did yesterday. Ohio State beat Purdue 42 to 14; Texas beat TCU 69 to 7 - I guess they're trying to edge Ohio State in the ratings. Tennessee lost to Mississippi; final score on that one was 38 to nothing. Arkansas beat SMU 28 to 15; Penn State over Maryland 48 to nothing; Southern Cal edged out Washington 16 to 7; UCLA over Oregon 13 to 10; Missouri beat Iowa State 40 to 13; Notre Dame won over Georgia Tech last night 38 to 20; and, of course, Purdue lost to Ohio State. Some pro scores today as they're in - these are finals - Dallas beat Washington 4l to 28; Detroit over St. Louis 20 to nothing; the Minnesota Vikings squeaked by Green Bay 9 to 7; and Kansas City, in the American League, beat New York 34 to 16. And we'll keep you posted on them as they come in later.

053:14:29 Conrad: Okay.

[Very long comm break.]
053:27:55 Weitz: Hello, 12, Houston. We'll be handing over from Madrid to Goldstone in 2 minutes. You may get a momentary Loss Of Signal.

053:28:04 Conrad: Okay.

053:28:08 Gordon: Roger.

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control at 53 hours, 31 minutes. Apollo 12's distance is now 162,315 nautical miles velocity 2,826 feet per second. The change of shift news conference in the MSC news center will be at 4:30 Central Standard Time, 4:30 p.m. for the change of shift news conference."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control at 53 hours, 43 minutes. This is a quiet period as the crew is having breakfast. We are in the midst of a shift changeover here in the Control Room ... This is Mission Control, Houston; at 53 Hours, 43 minutes."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; at 53 hours, 57 minutes now into the flight of Apollo 12. The Apollo 12 spacecraft, at this time, 162,988 nautical miles in altitude. Its velocity now reads 2,807 feet per second. In Mission Control Center we've just had a turnover in Flight Controller teams. Pete Frank and members of his Orange team are now aboard replacing the Jerry Griffin team. Our Capsule Communicator for this shift will be Don Lind who has just taken over the console from Paul Weitz. As was reported earlier, the Midcourse Correction No. 3 burn will not be done and the crew, the Apollo 12 crew, presumably at this time, is having breakfast. They were awakened approximately an hour ago with the call of reveille. The Change of Shift News Conference is scheduled to begin as previously announced at 4:30 and will include Flight Director Jerry Griffin and the Public Affairs Officer, Jack Riley. At 53 hours, 58 minutes into the flight, this is Apollo Control, Houston."

054:00:08 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston.

054:00:12 Conrad: Go ahead, Houston.

054:00:14 Lind: Pete, we've looked at the situation here. We don't think that a Midcourse Number 3 is going to be required. We're still evaluating number 4 it'll be small if we need it at all - so there will be no Midcourse Number 3. Also, we'd like you to balance the hydrogen for the fuel cells by turning tank number 2 heater Off, and - until we get those back in balance. Also, for your information, the Phoenix races were rained out after 53 laps, yesterday, and so they're going to be rerun today, and we'll let you know the outcome.

054:00:54 Conrad: Okay, very good. And hydrogen tank 2 heater is Off.

054:01:00 Lind: Roger. How's breakfast this morning?

054:01:10 Conrad: It's in work right now. Very good.

054:01:14 Lind: Fine.

[Long comm break.]
054:06:27 Conrad: Houston, 12.

054:06:30 Lind: Go. 12, this is Houston; go ahead, Pete.

054:06:51 Conrad: CDR Houston, Apollo 12.

054:06:54 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston. Go ahead. [Long pause.]

054:07:29 Conrad: Houston, Apollo 12. [Long pause.]

054:07:53 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston. Go.

054:07:59 Conrad: Roger. Two questions: one, how far out are we; and two, what time do we reach the lunar sphere of influence?

054:08:08 Lind: Roger. I'll get those numbers for you, Pete. You might want to turn your uplink squelch Off. We're kind of low on signal strength. And you may not hear us very well. I've called you several times. So, that may be a cure.

054:08:24 Conrad: Yes, I think we were just in the process of switching antennas or something.

054:08:28 Lind: Okay. Pete, the time for your crossing the lunar sphere of influence is 68 plus 30 plus 19. Your altitude above the Earth is 163,280. Your altitude above the Moon is 63,190.

054:09:13 Conrad: Okay, and how fast are we going now?

054:09:21 Lind: 2,797. Now, that's referenced to us...

054:09:24 Conrad: Okay, thank you.

054:09:25 Lind: ...down here.

054:09:29 Conrad: Understand.

[Long comm break.]
054:18:34 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston.

054:18:39 Conrad: Go ahead.

054:18:41 Lind: Pete, a question. We wanted to know whether you wanted to manage the antennas or whether you I want us to continue switching back and forth.

054:18:53 Conrad: We've gone to High Gain now. We'd like you to switch back and forth.

054:18:57 Lind: Okay, if - if a - you're going to leave control of that down on the ground, they would prefer to stay in Omni only and turn off the High Gain.

054:19:08 Conrad: Okay. We'll go back to Omni.

054:19:10 Lind: Fine. Thanks very much.

[Long comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; at 54 hours, 22 minutes now into the flight of Apollo 12. The spacecraft presently 163,645 nautical miles in altitude. Now traveling at 2,787 feet per second ..."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston. That time passed to Apollo 12 - that time for crossing the lunar sphere of influence was ground elapsed time of 68 hours, 30 minutes, 19 seconds. You just heard Commander Pete Conrad talking back and forth with the Capsule Communicator in Mission Control Don Lind. At 54 hours, 27 minutes now into the flight, this is Apollo control, Houston."

054:28:33 Conrad: Houston, 12.

054:28:36 Lind: Houston· Go.

054:28:43 Lind: Apollo 12, this is Houston. Go ahead.

054:29:17 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston. [Pause.]

054:29:25 Conrad: Houston, Apollo 12.

054:29:27 Lind: 12, go ahead.

054:29:32 Conrad: Roger. We changed out the LiOH canister and the LM/CM Delta-P is 1.8.

054:29:42 Lind: 1.8 what?

054:29:46 Conrad: 2.

054:29:47 Lind: Roger, thank you. It seems like every time you call, you catch us with our uplink signal down. Lithium hydroxide is changed and 1.82 for the Delta-P.

054:30:01 Conrad: You're breaking up. I think we are changing antennas. Say again.

054:30:05 Lind: Roger. Confirm. Got your lithium hydroxide change out and Delta-P at 1.82.

054:30:15 Conrad: Roger.

054:44:50 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston.

054:44:56 Conrad: Go ahead.

054:44:57 Lind: For your information, the Phoenix 200 is over. We still have only unofficial results, but the unofficial results show Al Unser as the winner. Number 2 is Ruby, and number 3 is Don Dallenbach.

054:45:16 Conrad: Roger. Thank you very much.

054:45:17 Lind: Very good.

[Comm break.]
054:46:31 Gordon: Hello, Houston; 12.

054:46:35 Lind: Houston. Go ahead.

054:46:39 Conrad: Okay, Don. Everybody has had breakfast, brushed their teeth, combed their hair, and we're even thinking about shaving today for you. But the big question I've got, I want to do that P52 option 3, the one that the Flight Plan has optional at 55 hours or so, and I want to remain in PTC while I do it. Do you concur?

054:47:04 Lind: We concur. Fine. Sounds like you're ready for another busy day.

054:47:12 Conrad: It really doesn't look that way, really. I think we'll just practice for a while.

054:47:15 Lind: You're all cleaned up and nowhere to go.

054:47:20 Conrad: We're going somewhere; we're not sure where.

054:47:24 Lind: We are.

054:47:30 Gordon: It doesn't look like we've moved very far for 2 days now.

054:47:33 Lind: It'll be a long way home. You've been travelling a long way.

[Comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; at 54 hours, 47 minutes now into the flight. Apollo 12 now 164,328 nautical miles above Earth. Its velocity now reads on our digital displays 2,767 feet per second. We've just passed up to Commander Pete Conrad the Phoenix 200 unofficial but final race results ..."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston. That was Dick Gordon making the report that they had completed breakfast, brushed their teeth and combed their hair and might even shave. The P52 reference is a platform alignment and Command Module Pilot Gordon did indicate he would like to do it around 55 hours ground elapsed time. We are at 54 hours, 52 minutes now ground elapsed time and this is Apollo Control, Houston."

055:01:45 Conrad: Houston, Apollo 12. Are you looking at the DSKY?

055:01:48 Lind: That's affirmative.

055:01:58 Conrad: Okay, Houston. You've cut out on the [garbled] antenna.

055:02:04 Lind: Roger. We are watching your DSKY.

055:02:24 Conrad: Houston, do you have the torquing angles?

055:02:28 Lind: That is affirmative.

055:02:32 Conrad: Okay. We're going to go ahead and torque.

055:02:33 Lind: Roger.

[Very long comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; at 55 hours, 14 minutes, now in the flight of Apollo 12. We presently show Apollo 12 at 165,029 nautical miles above the Earth. Its velocity now reads 2,747 feet per second. Now we pick up conversation with Apollo 12 while the computer alignment program is in process..."

Public Affairs Office - "That was Commander Pete Conrad talking with Don Lind and at 55 hours, 16 minutes into the flight, this is Apollo Control, Houston."

055:39:13 Bean: Houston, Apollo 12.

055:39:16 Lind: Houston. Go.

055:39:20 Bean: Roger. Just looking through the monocular again at the Earth, and looks like it's dark everywhere except the lower left-hand corner of California. Right in there - L.A. and San Diego, and I can't see Baja California. It may be just twilight there. It's kind of hazy - not hazy, but insofar as the dark light relationship, it's kind of difficult to tell. The lower left corner of California is the only part we can see in the sunshine right now.

055:40:01 Lind: Roger. What does the weather look like out there?

055:40:10 Bean: Looks beautiful. See it real well. It doesn't appear to be any clouds - any large cloud formations near it. There's a nice crescent-shaped large weather system that appears to be several hundred miles out to sea, but I don't know if that will affect it or not. But the whole area around that southern tip of California there is nice and clear.

055:40:41 Lind: Very good.

[Very long comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston, at 55 hours, 43 minutes now into the flight of Apollo 12. We currently show an altitude for the spacecraft of 165,802 nautical miles. Velocity now reads 2,725 feet per second..."

Public Affairs Office - "At 55 hours, 46 minutes now into the flight, this is Apollo Control, Houston."

056:04:43 Bean: Houston, Apollo 12.

056:04:47 Lind: Go ahead.

056:04:53 Bean: Been looking at the Earth some more through the monocular, and I think maybe the part of the U.S. that I thought was the lower left-hand corner, the Los Angeles area, it was just about to have sunset, was really not. I don't think I could see that because of the - it's color-related to the blue of the rest of the Earth. I think maybe it was the desert area around Phoenix and around in there, just thinking about the time it is now. And I'm not able to discern at all the lower left-hand corner of the U.S., I think, because of the colors.

056:05:38 Lind: Roger. A little smog out there in L.A.? Can't see through it?

056:05:47 Bean: No. I don't think its smog. I can't see any of that area. I think it's probably just that the Earth out there has more trees, shrubs, and the like, and that makes it sort of a gray-green which is sort of like the ocean whenever you look at it from this view. And they just blend in together, and you're not able to tell exactly where one starts and one ends. We noticed that a little bit as we were closer to earth and then now as we get out this far, about all we can see is something contrasting very greatly with those blue-grays or blue-greens. In this case, it was sort of a reddish-brown [garbled]...

056:07:52 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston. [Long pause.]

056:08:24 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston. [Long pause.]

056:09:04 Bean: Hey, Houston; Apollo 12.

056:09:06 Lind: Roger. Go. We lost the very end of that transmission because we were switching antennas, but it sounds like you got a great view up there. [Pause.]

056:09:24 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston.[Long pause.]

056:09:50 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston.

056:09:54 Bean: Houston, 12.

056:09:56 Lind: Roger. We were switching antennas there. Lost the last part of that transmission, but it sounds like you got a good view out there tonight.

056:10:06 Conrad: Yes, not too bad. Hey, Don, how'd the Saints and the Oilers make out today?

056:10:13 Lind: The Oilers tied on the last play of the game. 20-20 was the final score.

056:10:19 Conrad: What was the score?

056:10:20 Lind: 20-20.

056:10:22 Conrad: 20-20, huh? How'd the Saints do? They were playing the Giants.

056:10:35 Lind: 25 to 24 for New Orleans.

056:10:40 Conrad: Roger. Thank you.

056:10:41 Lind: Very good. Hey...

056:10:42 Conrad: Got some good news?

056:10:44 Lind: Yes. Say, listen, can you see any of Antarctica from your position in the daylight?

056:10:59 Conrad: That's affirmative, Don. We can see a large portion of it, as a matter of fact. It's continually in sunlight.

056:11:08 Lind: Roger.

056:11:21 Lind: Listen, I've got some other scores for you, if you are interested.

056:11:28 Conrad: Go ahead.

056:11:29 Lind: Okay. AFL: Houston and Denver 20-20; Kansas City over New York 34-16; Boston over Cincinnati 25-14; Buffalo over Miami 28 to 3; Oakland took San Diego 21-16; in the National, as I said, New Orleans over New York 25-24; Chicago 31, Atlanta 48; Philadelphia 17, L.A. 23; Detroit took St. Louis 20 to nothing; Dallas hl, Washington 28; and L.A. over Philadelphia, 23 to 17.

056:12:20 Conrad: Roger. Thank you very much.

056:12:26 Bean: And could you give us the exact longitude the terminator is on the Moon at this time?

056:12:37 Lind: Wait 1. We'll get it for you.

[Very long comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; at 56 hours, 15 minutes now into the mission. Apollo 12 is presently shown at 166,616 nautical miles above the Earth. It's presently traveling at a speed of 2,701 feet per second."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston. That was Capsule Communicator Don Lind giving the football scoreboard report. We are at 56 hours, 22 minutes now into the flight and this is Apollo Control."

056:26:08 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston.

056:26:13 Conrad: Go ahead.

056:26:15 Lind: The terminator on the Moon now is 1 degree west. We're trying to get it more accurately for you than that, but 1 degree west is the present terminator.

056:26:26 Conrad: Okay. Thank you.

[Long comm break.]
056:33:08 Conrad: Houston, Apollo 12.

056:33:12 Lind: Go, 12.

056:33:17 Conrad: We were just talking about the TV show this afternoon, and I guess what we'd like to do - it probably hasn't been seen before that I remember - If we could get a High-Gain antenna angle and the Sun in our center hatch so we could get as much light as possible into the Command Module, we'd like to use the TV and try and show the removal of the hatch, probe, and drogue and then take the TV over into the LM.

056:34:03 Lind: Very good. We'll get those angles for you. Sounds like a good show.

[Comm break.]
056:36:48 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston.

056:36:53 Conrad: Go ahead.

056:36:54 Lind: Just a note for the director of your TV presentation: We'll get the first 29 minutes of that presentation live; the rest of it will be recorded at Honeysuckle and shipped back to us. We'll get it in several days. But we'll only get directly through Goldstone your first 29 minutes.

056:37:17 Conrad: Okay. We'll move it up and make sure we get into the LM by then, anyway.

056:37:21 Lind: Okay. Just wanted to make sure you got all your best performance in the first period. [Pause.]

056:37:35 Gordon: We'll figure out something, Don.

056:37:38 Lind: Very good,

[Very long comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; at 56 hours, 41 minutes now into the flight of Apollo 12. The Apollo 12 spacecraft at this time 167,298 nautical miles away, its velocity now reading 2,682 feet per second. Don Lind has just had conversation with Apollo 12 concerning our upcoming television show now scheduled or now set for 1:52 AM tomorrow morning."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston. That was Pete Conrad who first brought up the subject of television. As you heard that final comment from Dick Gordon, we could move up the time of Lunar Module transfer - the transfer of the crew to the Lunar Module to coincide with the scheduled television time. We are now at 56 hours, 44 minutes into the flight and this is Apollo Control, Houston."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; at 57 hours, 10 minutes now into the flight of Apollo 12. We've had no conversation with Apollo 12 since our last report. However, we thought we would pass along altitude and velocity updates at this time. Apollo 12 is presently shown at an altitude of 60 - 168,023 nautical miles, its velocity now shown at 2,660 feet per second. This is Apollo Control Houston."

057:24:46 Bean: Hello, Houston; Apollo 12.

057:24:50 Lind: Go ahead, 12.

057:24:56 Bean: How about asking the food experts down there, we had a can of tuna fish spread salad last night, and there's about a half a can left today, and that stuff's still good to eat, isn't it?

057:25:10 Lind: We'll check. I'll be right back with you.

057:25:15 Bean: Thank you. [Long pause.]

057:25:32 Lind: 12?

057:25:36 Bean: Go ahead.

057:25:37 Lind: The surgeon suggests you try a new one. New can. [Pause.]

057:25:52 Bean: Well, Dick has this one in his hot hand, and we just opened it last night. You sure that one isn't all right?

057:29:42 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston.

057:29:46 Bean: Go ahead.

057:29:48 Lind: We're still checking with some people down here whether there's, any problem over that tuna fish, but why don't you hold off eating it until we get a better answer for you?

057:29:56 Bean: Okay.

[Long comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; at 57 hours, 35 minutes now into the flight of Apollo 12. We currently show Apollo 12 at 168,650 nautical miles above the Earth. It's velocity now reading 2,642 feet per second..."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston. At least for now, the consumption of tuna fish spread one-day opened remains an open item. We'll keep you posted on developments. At 57 hours, 37 minutes into the flight, this is Apollo control Houston."

057:39:25 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston. [Long pause.]

057:40:12 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston.

057:40:18 Conrad: Go ahead.

057:40:20 Lind: You can't imagine what consternation your tuna fish question has raised down here. We have a wide diversity of opinion.

057:40:26 Conrad: I decided it was...

057:40:29 Lind: The...

057:40:30 Gordon: I decided it was okay.

057:40:32 Lind: Well, we have a vote that it's okay. The majority says throw it away; there's a minority report that says everybody can eat it except Dick Gordon.

057:40:41 Conrad: Okay. That's done.

057:40:43 Lind: Roger. They recommend that you probably throw it away.

057:40:50 Conrad: Okay.

[Very long comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; at 1 - at 57 hours, 44 minutes into the flight of Apollo 12. Apollo 12's altitude now reads 168,882 nautical miles. Its velocity now 2,635 feet per second. We've closed the "tuna fish question".

Public Affairs Office - "At 57 hours, 45 minutes of the flight, this is Apollo Control, Houston."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; at 58 hours, 23 minutes now into the flight, of Apollo 12. We've had no conversation with the Apollo 12 crew since our last report. Presently we show an altitude of 169,851 nautical miles for Apollo 12. Its velocity now reads 2,607 feet per second. We're at 58 hours, 23 minutes and this is Apollo Control, Houston."

058:29:41 Bean: Hello, Houston; Apollo 12.

058:29:48 Lind: Apollo 12, go ahead.

058:29:52 Bean: Roger. Do you have a report on the families' activities today?

058:29:57 Lind: Negative. We'll see if we can find out what's been going on over here.

058:30:03 Bean: Thank you.

058:30:13 Conrad: Meanwhile, Houston, I can tell you what we've been doing since we got up this morning, just for your information.

058:30:19 Lind: Roger.

058:30:20 Conrad: We cleaned the spacecraft fore and aft and all lower decks and ladders; cleaned up the garbage and re-stowed everything. And everybody had a bath and everybody shaved. And Al's studying the Moon. I'm studying descent. Dick's been fitting the S-158 making sure it fits and works, and that's occupied us for about the last 3 hours.

058:30:48 Lind: Ah, very good. Where do you put the garbage when you haven't got a fantail to throw it over?

058:30:55 Conrad: We've defined the area below the window shade box and down next to the O2 mass as the fantail, and we have rigged a garbage bag down there. And we retransfer all of the gear out of the TSB's and neatly wrapped and packaged them and made sure they all had their pills and good things in them.

058:31:19 Lind: Very...

058:31:20 Conrad: ...and configured down there.

058:31:21 Lind: Very good. You sound incredibly neat.

058:31:29 Conrad: Haven't got much else to do, pal.

058:31:39 Lind: We'll get your - the reports on your families...

058:31:41 Conrad: Also on the...

058:31:44 Lind: Go ahead.

058:31:46 Conrad: Okay. Also, as we're approaching the Moon, of course, we're beginning to notice less and less of the Moon. We're moving out in front of it, and although - although the terminator is coming around, we're beginning to see less and less the illuminated portion of the Moon, and it's of becoming quite noticeable to us now.

058:32:07 Lind: Roger.

[Very long comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; at 58 hours, 35 minutes now into the flight. We presently show Apollo 12 at an altitude of 170,159 nautical miles. Its velocity now 2,599 feet per second. We have just received a report from Commander Pete Conrad speaking for the all-Navy Apollo 12 crew describing what they've been doing today..."

Public Affairs Office - "That was Capsule Communicator, Don Lind speaking with Pete Conrad aboard the Apollo 12 spacecraft. We're at 58 hours, 38 minutes now into the flight, and this is Apollo control, Houston."

058:54:03 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston.

058:54:07 Bean: Go ahead.

058:54:09 Lind: Roger. Just checked with your families. Pete, Jane reports that they've had a very quiet Sunday afternoon there. Everybody is home, and everybody is well, and there just really is not much excitement going on. It's just been a very quiet afternoon over at your house. Dick, Barbara says...

058:54:29 Conrad: Okay.

058:54:30 Lind: Barbara reports to you, Dick, that Sharon and Lynn Diamond are over for the evening, and they're expecting the Irwin’s over momentarily, and Jim McDivitt just left. She says the boys have gone back to school, and she thought things were going to be pretty quiet; but, between Barbara and Karen, she's got so many giggling girls around there that it's more noisy than she thought. The other thing she pointed out was that Father Connolly had been over and had noticed Barbara having a nap this afternoon, and coming out of church this evening he commented in front of some of the people standing there in the church that the last time he saw her she was - she had been asleep. And this was much to her consternation. Also, Barbara asks that you guys talk a little bit more. She says she certainly expected more conversation out of you than she's been getting. Al, your wife reported that they're all missing you. They're extremely proud of you.

[Comm break.]
058:57:03 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston. How do you hear? [Pause.]

058:57:14 Conrad: Houston, 12.

058:57:17 Lind: Roger. How do you hear now, Pete? [Pause.]

058:57:28 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston. [Long pause.]

058:57:43 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston. [Pause.]

058:57:57 Gordon: Hello, Houston; 12.

058:57:59 Lind: 12, Houston. Do you read?

058:58:07 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston.

058:58:16 Gordon: Houston, 12. Are you locked up now?

058:58:19 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston. Do you read me now?

058:58:24 Gordon: I read you loud and clear. How us?

058:58:26 Lind: I read you very fine. Sorry about switching antennas there. Al, your - As I started to say, your wife says that the family is missing you; they're very proud of how the flight is going along; and that they'll certainly be watching tomorrow. The children are all fine.

058:58:43 Bean: Great break.

058:58:48 Conrad: We're not getting you at all, Don. What are you having, a site hand-over or something? We've only gotten about two or three words in the last 5 minutes.

058:58:56 Lind: Roger. How do you hear me now? We - We've just switched the antennas.

058:59:03 Gordon: Roger. You're loud and clear, and you started cutting out after you said that Father Connolly was over and Barbara was taking a nap. Can you go back to that point?

058:59:11 Lind: Oh, yes. Yes. Father Connolly had been over in the afternoon and had seen Barbara taking a nap. So coming out of church this evening, in front of some of the members of the congregation, he said that the last time he had seen her she was asleep. And this was very embarrassing to her at the moment. Also...

058:59:30 Gordon: ...Well, that is better than what he could have said.

058:59:37 Lind: [Laughter] Also, Barbara had the comment for the whole crew that she's a little disappointed in how much you're talking. She certainly wanted you - expected that you'd talk more than she's been hearing lately.

058:59:50 Gordon: We're talking. She's just not hearing.

058:59:52 Lind: She also requests that when you talk, try to be a little funnier. Al, talked to your wife. She said that the family are missing you and that they're extremely proud of how the flight's been going. They'll be watching tomorrow; and, also, she wanted you to know that all the children were fine. This evening when Amy was going to bed, she turned to her mother and she said, "I want to see my daddy. I want to touch him." So, you're being missed. Also, she concurs with the decision on the tuna fish. She definitely was happy that you didn't eat the day old tuna fish. That's about all the family has to report.

059:00:50 Gordon: Okay. Thank you, Don.

059:00:52 Lind: Say, one other item for Pete. The board of directors has had a meeting, and the VFR has been replaced with IFR Conrad from now on.

059:01:05 Conrad: [Laughter] I understand. Okay. Very good.

059:01:09 Lind: Roger.

059:01:20 Gordon: Don, we're all decided up here that we're going to have to get another Saturn V ride because we sure missed the last one.

059:01:26 Lind: Very good [laughter].

[Comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; at 59 hours, 3 minutes into the flight. Apollo 12 now at an altitude of 170,851 nautical miles. Its velocity now reading 2,579 feet per second. Capsule Communicator, Don Lind, has just passed along family reports to the Apollo 12 crew."

059:03:00 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston.

059:03:04 Conrad: Go ahead, Houston.

059:03:05 Lind: Things are going so well we've decided that you do not need a state vector update at this time. So things are going along very nicely.

059:03:16 Conrad: Okay. What's your first hack on MCC 4?

059:03:23 Lind: Just about 3 feet a second.

059:03:27 Conrad: Are we going to do it or not?

059:03:32 Lind: We're still evaluating.

059:03:37 Conrad: Okay.

[Long comm break.]
059:10:05 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston.

059:10:09 Conrad: Go ahead.

059:10:11 Lind: Would you give us H2 tank heater number 2 to Auto?

059:10:19 Conrad: H2 heater number 2 to Auto.

059:10:23 Lind: Roger. Thank you.

059:10:26 Conrad: You're welcome.

[Very long comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "Apollo Control, Houston. That was Dick Gordon that suggested the Apollo 12 crew might need another ride on the Saturn V. We are at 59 hours, l0 minutes now into the flight and this is Apollo Control, Houston."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; at 59 hours, 29 minutes now into the flight of Apollo 12. Apollo 12 presently at an altitude of 171,497 nautical miles. Its velocity now reading 2,560 feet per second..."

Public Affairs Office - "That was Commander Pete Conrad aboard the spacecraft and at 59 hours, 30 minutes into the flight, this is Apollo Control Houston."

059:33:55 Bean: Houston, Apollo 12.

059:33:58 Lind: Go ahead, 12.

059:34:02 Bean: We been looking out at the Sun with our monocular, and we put the sunglass that goes with the telescope over the front of it. Been looking at the Sun and looks like there's two or three dark spots on the west limb of the Sun. Maybe 30 - 40 degrees in, about the equator. Other than that, it doesn't - we can't see anything else. Over.

059:34:36 Lind: Very good. If they're 30 or 40 degrees in, you won't have to worry about any flare particle from them.

059:34:44 Bean: Who's worried?

059:35:00 Lind: Sounds like you guys are having a real good review of astronomy this afternoon.

059:35:07 Bean: We've been studying astronomy, geography, geology, a few other things up here.

059:35:19 Lind: Roger.

059:35:25 Bean: Really not a lot to do on the way out. You've got your systems to monitor, and you got to eat, and keep yourself clean, get some sleep, and except for that, you’re free to do a little looking out the window and studying the checklists and maps and things that you're going to be using when you get to the lunar orbit.

059:35:53 Lind: You're in [garble] Rev.

059:35:54 Bean: So it's got to be a pretty pleasant trip. Yes, we'll make it all up starting tomorrow.

059:36:06 Stafford: Beano, this is your old Social Director speaking. One thing, I'll guarantee that those dark spots on the sun aren't clouds.

059:36:15 Bean: [Laughter] I thought it was particularly appropriate, since we were going to the Ocean of Storms, that we bailed out of the Earth in the midst of one of them.

059:36:27 Stafford: How about that.

059:36:32 Conrad: We thought for a minute we had a caution and warning failure because they all came on.

059:26:40 Stafford: Understand.

059:36:45 Conrad: What are you doing up so late, Social Director?

059:36:49 Stafford: Oh, I just thought I'd keep check on you, Pete. Looks like everything is just going great.

059:36:55 Stafford: [Laughter] There's not too many places we can go.

059:36:58 Stafford: Yes. Watching the plot up here...

059:37:01 Conrad: [Garbled].

059:37:05 Stafford: It's quite a view out there, isn't it, Pete?

059:37:10 Conrad: Sure is. Did you all learn any special tricks about viewing the Earth or the Moon? Did you think we haven't tried?

059:37:22 Stafford: No. I think we've passed on all the basic information and guess it's quite a view to see it rotate through the windows there and take pictures of it.

059:37:34 Conrad: Because, during launch, I usually tell Al which lights are on, if he has an electrical problem. Friday, all I could do was look over and tell him, I said, "Hey, Al, they're all on."

059:37:48 Stafford: No, we can probably plan some good simulations from now on.

059:38:02 Bean: We talked about it before; and Pete said, "Don't worry." He says, "If you ever have anything go wrong in flight, it'll be something you've never seen before in your life." He was right.

059:38:14 Stafford: Yes. That's - that's the way it always happens. [Pause.]

059:38:28 Stafford: One thing you've got the advantage of us. We couldn't see the Moon until we got just - right nearly to it by that westerly site. You've probably got a pretty good view of it now.

059:38:42 Bean: Yes. Of course, it's getting - The illuminated portion as we move out in front of it is getting less and less all the time. We're really beginning to notice that we're seeing less and less of it.

059:38:53 Stafford: Roger. [Long pause.]

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; at 59 hours, 39 minutes now into the flight. Apollo 12 presently at 171,728 nautical miles in altitude. It's velocity now reading 2,554 feet per second..."

059:39:35 Gordon: Houston, 12. Since we're not doing MCC 3, do they want to do an alignment here or just do another REFSMMAT alignment?

059:39:48 Stafford: Negative. We don't need that. Things are really ...

059:39:52 Gordon: Okay. How's that platform looking then, this morning? [Pause.]

059:40:07 Stafford: Your platform's looking really good, we'll try to get you some drift numbers.

059:40:15 Gordon: Okay.

059:40:36 Stafford: Apollo 12, your drifts are 1.2 mERU on all axes or less. One of there's even lower than that.

[Comm break.]
059:43:31 Stafford: Apollo 12, Houston. [Long pause.]

059:44:03 Stafford: Apollo 12, Houston.

059:44:08 Gordon: Go ahead.

MP3 Audio Clip [4 mins 28 sec]

059:44:09 Stafford: Did you get that drift report? Your platform is less than 1.2 mERU on all axes.

059:44:20 Gordon: Roger.

[Comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston. The gentleman in Mission Control Center who prefaced this conversation with Beano, this is your old Social Director is Colonel Tom Stafford who, as you will recall, was the Commander on Apollo 12. Shortly after Tom came on the line, the Commander of Apollo 12, Pete Conrad, chimed into the conversation. We are at 59 hours, 44 minutes..."

059:45:59 Stafford: Apollo 12, Houston. How's your sleeping bags working out up there, Pete?

059:46:07 Conrad: Real good, Tom. The first night I slept in a bag, and Al slept in a bag, and Dick slept up in the seat. He didn't sleep too well. And last night, I slept up in the seat, and Dick slept in my bag, and all of us like the bags. And one of the problems with the seat is that - and we're going to take care of that tonight - it's rattling around in here, and every time somebody stirs down below, why the seat bangs off the wall and that naturally wakes up the guy that's sleeping in it. It's kind of spring loaded, anyhow.

059:46:42 Stafford: Roger. Looks - you getting plenty of sleep? Over.

059:46:49 Conrad: Yes, plenty. We're getting more than I need.

059:46:52 Stafford: Good. The reports look real good down here. [Long pause.]

059:47:24 Gordon: Hey, Tom. What do you think of our RAD count?

059:47:28 Stafford: Say again?

059:47:34 Gordon: What do you think of our PRD count?

059:47:36 Stafford: Stand by 1, Dick, I'll check. [Pause.]

059:47:53 Stafford: Well, from down here, it looks like the total Rad count showed that you got practically nothing up there.

059:48:03 Gordon: Well, I wouldn't go so far as to say we've got nothing.

059:48:08 Stafford: At least, they call it 90 millirads.

059:48:19 Stafford: That's less than 1/300th of what atomic workers can get.

059:48:30 Stafford: And I'd nearly bet that the calorie count that you people can see up there just nearly zero.

059:48:41 Gordon: I wouldn't bet on that either.

059:48:44 Conrad: I would. The calorie count. [Long pause.]

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; 59 hours, 48 minutes now into the flight. Apollo 12 presently at 171,942 nautical miles. Its velocity now reading 2,548 feet per second. Tom Stafford has just called the crew to ask about their sleeping bags and generally carry on a chat session..."

Public Affairs Office - "Apollo Control, Houston. That was Pete Conrad first talking with Tom Stafford; then followed by Dick Gordon. We're at 59 hours, 50 minutes into the flight and continuing to monitor. This is Apollo Control Houston."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; at 60 hours, 17 minutes now into the flight. Apollo 12 presently at an altitude of 172,658 nautical miles. It's velocity now reads 2,527 feet per second. We have not spoken with the crew since our last report, and the atmosphere in mission control, at this time is quiet. As the various flight controllers making notes, looking into their consoles and planning ahead for a more active day tomorrow. We're at 60 hours, 18 minutes and this is Apollo control."

060:34:51 Lind: Apollo 12, Houston.

060:34:55 Gordon: Go ahead, Houston.

060:34:57 Lind: Roger. We'd like to check and see if the expanded deadband has been collapsed. We'd like to check your load by looking at Noun 79, so we'd like to ask you to enter a Verb 79 for us.

060:35:20 Gordon: Okay, how's that? Proceed on that and I'll be okay, huh?

060:35:31 Lind: Load looks all right to us. You can go ahead and proceed.

060:35:33 Gordon: Are you looking at it, Don?

060:35:34 Lind: That's affirmative. You can go ahead and proceed.

060:35:34 Gordon: Looks okay to me, too.

060:35:48 Gordon: Hey, Don, I think all of us up here are gaining weight on this food; it's been so good.

060:35:54 Lind: Say again, 12.

060:35:55 Gordon: Pete and I just had frankfurters and - say, this food up here has been so good, I think we're going to gain weight.

060:36:04 Lind: 12...

060:36:05 Gordon: Pete and I just polished off four frankfurters and some apple - applesauce; Al Bean hasn't quite eaten his yet, but it's really been good.

060:36:15 Lind: Hey, you're just killing me, man. I'm sitting down here without anything to eat.

060:36:23 Gordon: You mean the Tastee-Freeze isn't open?

060:36:27 Lind: I haven't been in it for a while. Just remember to do your mild exercise today so you don't gain weight.

[Long comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston, at 60 hours, 40 minutes now in the flight. At the present time we show Apollo 12 at an altitude of 173,196 nautical miles. Velocity now reads 2,512 feet per second. Still very quite in the Control Center and at 60 hours, 40 minutes, this is Apollo Control, Houston."

060:44:13 Bean: Houston, Apollo 12.

060:44:17 Lind: Go ahead, 12.

060:44:22 Bean: Roger. At 61:15, do you want an O2 fuel cell purge and waste water dump like the Flight Plan calls for?

060:44:30 Lind: That's affirmative.

060:44:35 Bean: Okay, and what do you want us to dump the water to, 10 percent? [Pause.]

060:45:22 Lind: 12, we'd like to recommend that you dump to zero since we're going to have quite a time before we'll have another opportunity for a dump.

060:45:34 Bean: Okay.

[Very long comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control, Houston; at 60 hours, 54 minutes now into the flight of Apollo 12. Apollo 12 presently shows an altitude of 173,531 nautical miles above the Earth. The spacecraft velocity now reads 2,502 feet per second. Capsule Communicator, Don Lind has conversed briefly with Apollo 12."

Public Affairs Office - "That was Lunar Module pilot, Al Bean aboard Apollo 12 talking with Mission Control in Houston. We're at 60 hours, 55 minutes, and this is Apollo control, Houston."

061:14:33 Conrad: Houston, Apollo 12.

061:14:39 Lind: 12, Houston.

061:14:43 Conrad: Roger. One waste water dump, one O2 purge coming up.

061:14:47 Scott: Roger.

061:14:51 Conrad: Who's that? David?

061:14:55 Scott: Good ear.

061:15:00 Conrad: What are you doing ...

061:15:01 Gordon: Good evening, David.

061:15:02 Conrad: ...up so late?

061:15:03 Scott: Watching after you.

[Very long comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control of Houston at 61 hours, 19 minutes now into the flight. Apollo 12 continuing on its course to the moon presently at an altitude of 174,130 nautical miles Continuing to slow down, it's velocity now reads 2,485 feet per second. Pete Conrad just called in and received a bit of a surprise. The gentleman at the Capcom console at least for this moment, is Dave Scott, backup commander for Apollo 12..."

Public Affairs Office - "Apollo Control, Houston. As was previously reported, Midcourse Correction number 3 was deleted from the Flight Plan. The requirement for the Midcourse Correction number 4 burn is still being evaluated at Mission Control. In any case, if this burn is accomplished it's magnitude will be at most very small, perhaps in the order of 3 feet per second. Television is scheduled for tomorrow morning, which is rapidly approaching for tomorrow morning at 1:52 a.m. Central time and as reported by the crew earlier they will probably move their Lunar Module transfer time forward to coincide with the 29 minutes of television which will be carried live. We're at 61 hours, 21 minutes into the flight and this is Apollo Control, Houston."

061:25:32 Scott: Apollo 12, Houston. We see zero on your waste water. Thanks very much.

061:25:39 Conrad: Okay.

[Very long comm break.]
Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control Houston at 61 hours, 48 minutes now into the flight of Apollo 12. Our displays presently show Apollo 12 at an altitude of 174,824 nautical miles. Its velocity now reads 2,465 feet per second."

Public Affairs Office - "This is Apollo Control Houston. Meanwhile in Mission Control Center, Houston discussions have been taking place regarding the possibility of moving the television time forward or in advance of that shown in the Flight Plan. These times have not yet been defined. As soon as they become known to us we will pass them along immediately. We're now at 61 hours, 49 minutes into the flight and this is Apollo Control Houston."

061:55:47 Gordon: Hello, Houston; 12. [Pause.]

061:56:10 Gordon: Hello, Houston; 12.

061:56:13 Scott: Go ahead, 12. [Pause.]

061:56:21 Scott: Apollo 12, Houston. Go ahead.

061:56:28 Gordon: Hello, Houston; Apollo 12.

061:56:31 Scott: Apollo 12, go.

061:56:36 Gordon: Roger, Houston. Looks like that water dump has kind of ruined our PTC, here. I was just wondering if you want us to do anything with it or just stand by and wait until the - the fixed attitude at 63 hours.

061:56:57 Scott: Roger. We - We followed your water dump maneuver.

[Comm break.]
061:58:08 Scott: Wait 1. 12, we'll just continue to watch your attitude changes for a while, and - if anything -if your yaw swings too far, we can come out of it, but let's stay in the attitude you're in now for a while.

061:58:26 Gordon: Okay.

061:58:28 Scott: In PTC for a while is what I intended to say.

061:58:33 Gordon: Roger. Understand.

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