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Day One Part Three:
Trans-Lunar Injection

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Day One Part Five:
Trans-Lunar Coast

Apollo 16

Day One Part Four: Transposition, Docking and Ejection

Corrected Transcript and Commentary Copyright 2006 David Woods and Tim Brandt. All rights reserved.

06:05

Start of Chapter

02:44

Separation from S-IVB

03:04

End of CM transcript

03:09

Start of TV

03:10

Soft Docking with LM

03:15

Re-start of CM transcript

03:17

Hard Docking with LM

03:22

Initial report of LM skin peeling

03:49

LM extraction from S-IVB .

03:59

End of CM tape transcript

04:02

S-IVB Separation Manouvre

04:10

Crew thanks to Booster team

04:19

TLI Burn description

04:54

Shift Change
Flight Plan changes
06:13
More Flight Plan changes
06:39
End of Chapter
06:57

[Apollo 16 has completed the Trans Lunar Injection burn (TLI) of the S-IVB third stage of the Saturn V booster. The S-IVB now holds only 2.75 tonnes of the 108.45 tonnes of propellant that it was launched with, the balance having been consumed to place the stage and the attached Apollo spacecraft on the long, three day ballistic coast to the Moon. The 40 metre long, 65 tonne "stack" of booster and spacecraft is travelling at 36,360 kilometres per hour, but is slowing down rapidly since it is still subject to approximately one quarter of Earth's surface gravity. It will continue to slow down until the Moon's gravitational pull exceeds that of the Earth, in about two days time.]

[Inside the Command Module, John Young, Ken Mattingly and Charlie Duke are continuing to prepare to separate the Command and Service Modules (CSM) from the conical shroud known as the SLA, in 20 minutes time. (NASA sources of the time give varying meanings for this acronym; either Service Module/Lunar Module Adapter as in the Flight Plan or, more commonly, Spacecraft/Lunar Module Adapter.) This will then allow them to turn the CSM around, dock with the Lunar Module (LM) and extract it from the SLA. This is referred to as Transposition, Docking and Extraction (TD&E)]

[At present, the on-board tape recorder is not selected on, so there is no transcript of the crew's discussions. The CM transcript will start at 003:03:09, two minutes before separation. For now, we can only follow the crew's communications with Mission Control, where the CapCom is Gordon Fullerton, just as it has been through launch, Earth orbit and the TLI burn.]

002 44 53 Fullerton: Roger, Charlie, you're loud and clear.

002 45 05 Mattingly: Okay, Houston, the Direct O2 is coming on; we're pumping her up right now.

002 45 09 Fullerton: Roger.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston 2 hours 46 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. We are now receiving radar data through Hawaii. We presently show Apollo 16 at an altitude of 766 nautical miles [1,418 kilometres].

002 49 28 Duke: Okay, Houston. I'm going to Omni Charlie.

[See 001:29:49 for a description of the four omni-directional S-Band antennae the crew are using to maintain communication with Mission Control.]

002 49 43 Duke: Gordy, you got Omni Charlie. Over.

002 49 47 Fullerton: Roger; Omni Charlie, Charlie.

Public Affairs Officer: This is Apollo Control, Houston; two hours, 51 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Our countdown clock at Mission Control shows the time of separation is less than 13 minutes away now.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston, at two hours, 54 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Coming up now on that time when the booster initiates its manoeuvre to separation attitude.

[After the TLI burn, at 002:41:50, the S-IVB and attached Apollo spacecraft was manoeuvred to the in-plane local horizontal. This involved a -25 degree pitch (down), and minus 1 degree yaw (left).Now, at 002:54:19, the stack is being commanded to manouevre +120 degrees (up), -40 degrees (yaw) and -180 degrees in roll. This will give the crew the optimum lighting conditions for the TD&E.]

002 54 35 Mattingly: Okay, and we are manoeuvring to the attitude right now.

002 54 38 Fullerton: Okay.

002 55 12 Fullerton: 16, we see the cabin is up to 5.7 now.

[In Mission Control, the EECOM is monitoring the cabin pressure, which has now reached the target of 5.7 pounds per square inch, gauge [39.3 kPa]. The crew will now close the Direct O2 valve.]

002 55 17 Mattingly: Roger. Thank you, sir.

002 55 33 Fullerton: We'd like Omni Delta, please.

002 56 13 Fullerton: Omni Alpha now, please.

002 56 17 Duke: Say again.

002 56 19 Fullerton: Give us Omni Alfa, Charlie.

002 56 24 Duke: Okay, you got it.

002 57 20 Fullerton: Request Omni Bravo now, please.

002 57 26 Duke: You got it.

Public Affairs Officer: Seven minutes away now from time of separation. We presently show Apollo 16 in altitude of 2,620 nautical miles [4,852 kilometres]. We are at 2 hours, 58 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Flight director Gene Kranz, is taking a check with his flight control team, for a Go/No-Go for transposition, docking and ejection of the Lunar Module.

002 58 28 Fullerton: Like Omni Charlie, please.

002 58 33 Duke: Roger; Omni Charlie.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston, at 2 hours 59 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. We presently show Apollo 16 at 2,800 nautical miles [5,185 kilometres] and velocity at 26,931 feet [8,208 metres] per second.

002 59 23 Fullerton: 16, Houston. The booster is in attitude and stable. You have a Go for T&D.

[The S-IVB has completed its manoeuvre to the TD&E attitude.]

002 59 33 Young: Roger. We'll give you a call just before we get off.

002 59 40 Fullerton: Okay.

Public Affairs Officer: This is Apollo Control, Houston at 3 hours Ground Elapsed Time. Present altitude of Apollo 163,004 nautical miles [Note: PAO has mistaken the altitude]. Velocity now reading at 26,408 feet[8,049 metres] per second. We are four minutes away now from time of - proposed time of seperation. This is Apollo Control, Houston.

Public Affairs Officer: This is Apollo Control, Houston at 3 hours, 2 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Apollo 16's present distance away from Earth now 3,388 nautical miles [6,274 kilometres].

003 02 54 Mattingly: Okay, Houston. We're getting ready to arm the pyros. Are you ready?

003 03 03 Fullerton: Roger. We're ready.

003 03 04 Mattingly: Okay; Pyro Arm A is Armed; and B is Armed.

[CM Transcript starts. The crew are on AOH Page 4-322, working through the TD&E checklist.]

003 03 09 Duke (onboard): Okay. GDC Align.

003 03 11 Mattingly (onboard): That's - done.

003 03 13 Duke (onboard): Okay. EMS Function, Delta-V.

003 03 14 Fullerton: Roger. That looks good.

003 03 17 Mattingly (onboard): Okay.

003 03 18 Duke (onboard): Okay, let's read it - you want me to read out the - the rest of it?

003 03 20 Young (onboard): Okay. Go ahead.

003 03 21 Mattingly (onboard): Let's see, I want to get a Verb 62 in here. Is that - that should be about where we start the time, right?

003 03 24 Young (onboard): Yeah.

003 03 25 Duke (onboard): Yeah. We're right at where we start the DET.

003 03 29 Mattingly (onboard): Okay, now, what we're gonna do - is we're gonna start the clock, and I'll call times. At 50, I'll take the CMC Mode switch to Auto; at 58, I start hitting the Plus-X. And then at zero, I push this button.

003 03 49 Young (onboard): Okay.

003 03 50 Mattingly (onboard): We ullage for three seconds, and I release it.

003 03 52 Young (onboard): Okay.

003 03 54 Mattingly (onboard): I'll take my Accel Command; pitch up - in ten seconds, I'll pitch up, making sure this needle's positive.

003 03 59 Young (onboard): Okay.

003 04 02 Mattingly (onboard): When it goes positive, you can go to ...

003 04 03 Young (onboard): Pro ...

003 04 04 Mattingly (onboard): ... V18.

003 04 05 Young (onboard): Okay.

003 04 06 Mattingly (onboard): And - and - Yeah.

003 04 07 Young (onboard): Pro[ceed] when you pitch.

003 04 08 Mattingly (onboard): Yeah. And it's a Verb 61.

003 04 09 Young (onboard): Okay.

003 04 10 Mattingly (onboard): Okay?

003 04 12 Young (onboard): Yeah.

003 04 14 Mattingly (onboard): Shall we?

003 04 15 Young (onboard): Yeah.

003 04 16 Mattingly (onboard): Okay.

003 04 17 Duke (onboard):Okay.

003 04 18 Young (onboard): [Garble]?

003 04 19 Duke (onboard):Okay. Yeah. EMS Mode to Normal.

003 04 20 Mattingly (onboard): Okay, I'm going to catch that at the last minute because it counts.

003 04 22 Duke (onboard):Okay.

003 04 24 Mattingly (onboard): You know, John, if you'll just notice what it is for me...

003 04 25 Young (onboard): Okay.

003 02 26 Mattingly (onboard): ... so we have some measure. Okay? Ready to start the clock?

003 04 28 Duke (onboard):Yeah. I want to get my countdown on time.

Public Affairs Officer: This is Apollo Control, Houston at 3 hours, 4 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Apollo 16 presently at a height of 3,703 nautical miles [6,858 kilometres].

003 04 35 Young: Okay, we're coming up on 59:40.

003 04 40 Young: Mark. [This statement is attributed to Ken Mattingly in the CM Transcript]

003 04 41 Fullerton: Roger.

003 04 39 Mattingly (onboard): Okay, I'm going to hit Normal on the EMS. Eight - Auto.

003 04 54 Mattingly (onboard): This is the right one?

003 02 57 Young (onboard): Yeah.

003 04 58 Mattingly (onboard):1, 2 - Bang!

003 05 00 Duke (onboard):There we go ...

[Separation of the CSM from the SLA is a fast but complex event. A train of explosive cords sever electrical connections between the Service Module and the S-IVB; they cut the metal structure joining the SM to the SLA to allow the spacecraft to come free; they cut the upper 75% of the conical SLA into four long sections which are now only joined to the S-IVB by spring loaded partial hinges at the centre of their lower edge; they set off pyrotechnic thrusters, mounted within the intact portion of the SLA, which force pistons to push on the outside edge of each SLA panel, causing them to begin rotating away from the enclosed Lunar Module. Once the panels have rotated about 45 from the centreline of the launch vehicle, the hinges disengage, allowing the springs within the hinge assembly to push the panels away at about 2.5 m/s, leaving the LM exposed on top of the Saturn's third stage.(A15FJ)]

003 05 01 Mattingly (onboard): 1, 2, 3, release. It's off. Oh, boy. We're holding attitude pretty good. Pitch is - pitch up. Okay, Pro - John.

003 05 15 Young (onboard): Pro -.

003 05 16 Mattingly (onboard): Okay ...

Public Affairs Officer: 3 hours, 5 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. We've had small sep[aration] burn.

003 05 17 Duke (onboard): Pro's in; talkbacks are all gray.

[The crew are now working through Serial 5, placing the CSM in required post-separation configuration (AOH Vol 2 Page 4-325)]

003 05 18 Mattingly (onboard): Good.

003 05 19 Young (onboard): All the talkbacks are gray.

[Checking that all SM RCS propellant valves and helium supply valves are closed.]

003 05 20 Mattingly (onboard): Okay.

003 05 21 Duke (onboard): Okay. The Reactant Valve is going to [garble].

003 05 22 Mattingly (onboard): All right.

003 05 23 Duke (onboard): Okay, close the Secs ...

003 05 24 Young: Okay; all the talkbacks are still gray, Houston. It's pitching around now.

003 05 26 Duke (onboard): Okay, hit these four to Close.

003 05 29 Fullerton: Roger, John.

003 05 31 Duke (onboard): Okay, and I got a gray on ...

003 05 33 Mattingly (onboard): Man, look at all the junk out there.

003 05 34 Young (onboard): Let me look out here and see what that stuff looks like [garble].

003 05 46 Young (onboard): There go the doors.

003 05 49 Duke (onboard): Can you see one?

003 05 50 Young (onboard): Yeah.

003 05 51 Duke (onboard): Oh, I see one.

003 05 52 Mattingly (onboard): Okay, let's look for that booster. That's the guy I don't want to hit. Watch my - watch my hand controller, John.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston at 3 hours, 6 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Apollo 16 presently at a distance of 4,017 nautical miles [7,439 kilometres].

003 06 05 Young (onboard): There's a door out there by the Earth (cough).

003 06 10 Duke (onboard): Okay. Did you get Direct Ullage Two, open?

003 06 12 Mattingly (onboard): Direct Ullage.

003 06 13 Young (onboard): There he is. He's right out there.

003 06 14 Mattingly (onboard): Okay. We're clear?

003 06 15 Young (onboard): Yeah.

003 06 16 Duke (onboard): Okay.

003 06 17 Young (onboard): You're well clear, and you're about 60 feet out.

003 06 19 Duke (onboard): Okay. Load the DAP.

003 06 20 Mattingly (onboard): Not yet, we got to get ...

003 06 21 Duke (onboard): Oh, okay. That's right. We got to go there.

003 06 24 Mattingly (onboard): Okay. Man, did you ever see so much junk?

003 06 30 Young (onboard): No.

003 06 31 Mattingly (onboard): Oh, look at that. It's like a picture.

003 06 32 Young (onboard): Yeah.

003 06 33 Mattingly (onboard): Okay.

003 06 34 Young (onboard): Load the DAP.

003 06 35 Mattingly (onboard): Wait, wait, wait - I'm not clear yet.

003 06 38 Young (onboard): Okay.

003 06 39 Mattingly (onboard): Yeah, let me get my ullage in here before you - before you change the DAP on me.

003 06 44 Young (onboard): Okay. Is it going to stop by itself?

003 06 46 Mattingly (onboard): Yes, sir.

003 06 49 Young (onboard): You want Key Release?

003 06 51 Mattingly (onboard): Yeah.

003 06 53 Young (onboard): Ahhh. That maneuver put us [garble].

003 06 56 Mattingly (onboard): Okay; here goes. l, l, 2, 3, 4.

003 07 02 Young (onboard): That's 4...

003 07 03 Mattingly (onboard): Okay. Now you can change it.

003 07 05 Young (onboard): Key Release. Verb - Verb what? Verb 48 ...

003 07 07 Mattingly (onboard): Enter, no, you got to Enter first. John, let's go back to your Release - Key Release - Key Release. There you go.

003 07 16 Young (onboard): Verb 40 what?

000 07 17 Mattingly (onboard): Verb 48 Enter.

003 07 19 Young (onboard): [Garble] 111 [garble].

003 07 22 Mattingly (onboard): 11102. Hey, how you doing with that TV?

003 07 25 Duke (onboard):Coming up on the - getting the - Antenna's going to Reacq right now.

003 07 32 Young (onboard): Looks like it's about 80 feet out.

003 07 35 Mattingly (onboard): Looks like it's still open.

003 07 36 Duke: Okay, Houston. You got the high gain?

003 07 38 Young (onboard): Well, I think you're closing, but I sure can't tell it ...

003 07 39 Fullerton: Roger, Charlie.

003 07 41 Duke (onboard): You got the DAC started?

003 07 22 Young (onboard): ...[garble].

003 07 43 Mattingly (onboard): Oh, I forgot! Ten feet, f/8, 12.

003 07 46 Duke (onboard): Okay.

003 07 50 Mattingly (onboard): [Garble] turn the power on and I think I'm gonna hold it off for asecond here [garble].

003 07 56 Duke (onboard): Yeah.

003 07 57 Mattingly (onboard): [Garble] close [garble].

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston at 3 hours, 8 minutes now on Ground Elapsed Time. We show Apollo 16 at a height of 4,435 nautical miles [8,213 kilometres].

003 08 05 Duke (onboard): Okay, did you get the DAP?

003 08 06 Young (onboard): The DAP is set.

003 08 12 Mattingly (onboard): Man, that looks like I'm opening, doesn't it, John?

003 08 19 Young (onboard): Yeah [garble] you [garble].Whatever you [garble] it [garble] much to open it.

003 08 23 Mattingly (onboard): I don't want to put in too much [garble] rate.

003 08 25 Young (onboard): That's right [garble].

003 08 28 Mattingly (onboard): Hey, when that thing turned around, guys, the crosshairs in the COAS are within the docking target.

003 08 37 Duke (onboard): Well, I can't get - I - I got this half of a picture ...

003 08 39 Young (onboard): It is close - closing, isn't it?

003 08 44 Mattingly (onboard): Yeah, he is.

003 08 44 Duke: Okay, Houston, you ought to be getting some TV.

003 08 47 Mattingly (onboard): I'm trying to get a mark on that.

003 08 50 Fullerton: I haven't got it yet; we're working on it.

003 08 54 Mattingly (onboard): Have you - how does the monitor look?

003 08 56 Duke (onboard): It looks great; but all I got is just this little picture - the cor - the corner of the picture. I can't ...

003 08 59 Mattingly (onboard): Well, if you move the ...

003 09 01 Young (onboard): You got to move the camera.

003 09 02 Mattingly (onboard): ... camera?

003 09 03 Duke (onboard): That's what I've been trying to do, and I can't get any more [garble].

00 03 09 05 Mattingly (onboard): [Garble]. That thing is maneuvering in attitude a little bit. I don't think I'm closing [garble].

003 09 13 Young (onboard): [Garble].

003 09 14 Mattingly (onboard): Let it ride?

003 09 15 Young (onboard): [Garble].

003 09 19 Duke (onboard): Hmph, there we are - perfect picture.

003 09 30 Young (onboard): I don't think you're closing.

003 09 35 Mattingly (onboard): Give me [garble].

003 09 36 Young (onboard): [Garble].

003 09 37 Mattingly (onboard): Give me ....

[End of CM transcript until 003:16:13]

Public Affairs Officer:Apollo Control, Houston. 3 hours, 10 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. The black and white picture is beginning to come in now. Television is now showing -

003 10 01 Fullerton: We got a picture now, Charlie, and it looks real good.

003 10 06 Duke: Man, it just looks like a picture book from up here, Gordo. We must have a zillion particles along with us.

003 10 17 Fullerton: Roger. We see the particles and - great picture!

003 10 22 Duke: Hey, is the zoom in too much, Gordo? You - Let me take it out a little bit.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston at 3 hours, 11 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Apollo 16 now 4851 nautical miles [8,984 kilometres] away from the Earth.

003 10 43 Fullerton: That's just right, Charlie. That's a good zoom setting right now.

003 10 47 Duke: Super!

003 11 09 Duke: Gordy, looks like Orion is - is hanging in there pretty well. She looks great.

003 11 16 Fullerton: Looks the same to us.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo control, Houston. 3 hours, 13 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Apollo 16 presently 5195 nautical miles [9,621 kilometres] away from the Earth.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo control, Houston. 3 hours 15 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Apollo 16 now 5536 nautical miles [10,253 kilometres].

003 14 58 Young: About a foot out now, Houston.

003 15 01 Fullerton:Roger. Looks like a real smooth joinup.

003 15 18 Mattingly: Barber pole.

003 15 23 Young: Okay, we're captured there, Houston.

003 15 26 Fullerton: Roger.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo 16 reporting that they have captured the Lunar Module. We're at three hours, 16 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. We show an altitude of 5 706 nautical miles [10,567 kilometres].

003 16 13 Young: Yeah.

[CM transcript restarts]

003 17 18 Young (onboard): [Garble] on?

003 17 20 Mattingly (onboard): Well, I'm going back over them, and I can't see - Well, I don't know.

003 17 38 Mattingly (onboard): I tell you, it doesn't dress up very much - or even.

003 17 43 Young (onboard): [Garble] should be [garble].

003 17 49 Duke (onboard): Looks like something in the [garble] or something.

003 17 52 Young (onboard): [Garble] Charlie.

003 18 00 Mattingly (onboard): Man, this patience biz is hard to take (laughter). We're dressing up in pitch now, John, and the yaw is, too. We're gonna have lots of time here.

003 18 14 Young: Ken's taking some time in dressing this thing up, getting these attitudes right.

003 18 21 Mattingly (onboard): Seems to be...

003 18 22 Fullerton: Okay, John.

003 18 24 Mattingly (onboard): ...quite a bit from the attitude that we had.

003 18 43 Duke (onboard): Look at that. Isn't that something else?

003 18 46 Young (onboard): Yeah.

003 18 57 Mattingly (onboard): [Garble] fired it again, it looked like [garble].

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo control, Houston. 3 hours, 19 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Apollo 16's present distance from Earth 6,246 nautical miles [11,568 kilometres], velocity now reading 21,466 feet [6,543 metres] per second.

003 19 15 Mattingly (onboard): My docking budget didn't allow for all this. But I get no prize if I break it.

003 19 42 Young (onboard): [Garble].

003 19 44 Duke (onboard): Looks like Mylar.

003 19 45 Young (onboard): Yeah, I think it's probably Mylar. I think we got some gas [garble] trapped in those blankets maybe.

003 19 51 Mattingly (onboard): John, is it worth dressing up the roll, do you think?

003 19 54 Young (onboard): I don't think so. It looks like that's [garble].

003 19 57 Duke (onboard): Yeah, it looks [garble] in.

003 19 58 Mattingly (onboard): Okay; we're about - I'm trying to guess what it is in degrees we're off. I guess we're still off maybe 3 or 4 degrees.

003 20 05 Young (onboard): Ain't supposed to be off that far.

003 20 08 Mattingly (onboard): I'll go on over...

003 20 09 Young (onboard): [Garble] what the book says.

003 20 10 Duke (onboard): [Garble] 9?

003 20 11 Young (onboard): Yeah.

003 20 12 Mattingly (onboard): Well, you know they don't tell you how to tell the degrees you're off. I - I guess I never worried about it except [garble].

003 20 19 Duke (onboard): [Garble] pitch and yaw [garble] degrees.

003 20 22 Young (onboard): Yeah [garble] degrees.

003 20 33 Young (onboard): Coming back.

003 20 34 Mattingly (onboard): Yeah.

003 20 35 Young (onboard): [Garble] get it back [garble].

003 20 37 Mattingly (onboard): Yeah. Okay; all we have to do in order to do it now is what?

003 20 42 Duke (onboard): Put Docking Probe, Retract , to Prim[ary] 1. That's all you got to do.

003 20 46 Mattingly (onboard): Okay.

003 20 47 Young (onboard): Say when.

003 20 49 Mattingly (onboard): Yeah, [garble] get the camera started.

003 20 51 Young (onboard): Early?

003 21 05 Mattingly (onboard): We got both rates nulling at the same time.

003 21 08 Young (onboard): Okay.

003 21 22 Mattingly (onboard): Little more help here in pitch [garble].

003 21 29 Young (onboard): Okay, you guys.

003 21 31 Mattingly (onboard): Okay, Charlie.

003 21 32 Young (onboard): [Garble] pitch?

003 21 34 Mattingly (onboard): I tell you what. We're within a width of a line.

003 21 36 Young (onboard): That's good.

003 21 37 Duke (onboard): That's good.

003 21 38 Young (onboard): Okay.

003 21 39 Mattingly (onboard): I'm ready.

003 21 40 Duke (onboard): Okay.

003 21 41 Young (onboard): Okay.

003 21 42 Duke (onboard): Prim 1. Here it comes.

003 21 55 Duke (onboard): Man, I think that was it.

003 21 57 Young (onboard): [Garble] it goes Free [garble]. Auto.

003 21 59 Mattingly (onboard): I am Free.

003 22 00 Duke (onboard): Okay. Did you get a...

003 22 01 Young: Okay, Houston. We're hard docked.

003 22 03 Duke (onboard): Did you get a - a gray?

003 22 04 Fullerton: Roger, John. We saw it come in.

003 22 08 Duke (onboard): Did you get grays?

003 22 08 Mattingly: And there is no question when you get the latches.

003 22 11 Young: Yep.

003 22 12 Duke (onboard): SECS Pyro Arm, Two, Safe?

003 22 13 Fullerton: Roger, Ken.

Public Affairs Officer: 3 hours, 22 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Apollo 16 at 68,045 nautical miles away [Incorrect call by the PAO - probably should be 6,845 nautical miles].

003 22 15 Mattingly (onboard): Pyro Arms 1 and 2, Safe.

003 22 16 Duke (onboard): SECS Logic, Two, Off?

003 22 18 Mattingly (onboard): Logic, Two, Off.

003 22 19 Duke (onboard): EDS Power, Off.

003 22 21 Mattingly (onboard): EDS Power, Off.

003 22 23 Duke (onboard): CB EDS, Three, Open?

003 22 25 Mattingly (onboard): EDS 1, 2, 3, Open.

003 22 28 Fullerton: John, this is Houston.

003 22 31 Young: Go ahead. Over.

003 22 32 Fullerton: We'd like - We noticed the mixing valves cycling about once every 10, 15 seconds. We'd like to give you a mark, at which time we want you to put the Glycol Evap Temp In Valve in Manual and try to catch the flow rate at a - at a appropriate setting. I'll - I'll give you kind of a countdown and a mark here.

003 22 54 Mattingly (onboard): I think we saw it before.

003 22 55 Young: Yeah, we've been noticing that ourselves.

003 22 56 Mattingly (onboard): Okay, Charlie. Let me - let me give you some numbers here before I get off. With it - When we were docked...

003 23 01 Fullerton: Okay, flow rate's high and starting back down.

003 23 07 Young (onboard): Go ahead and catch it.

003 23 08 Mattingly (onboard): Okay.

003 23 25 Fullerton: John, now all of a sudden we've stopped seeing it - that it has stopped cycling. You didn't throw the switch already, did you?

003 23 34 Young: That's negative. We're awaiting your mark there.

003 23 34 Young (onboard): That's negative. We're awaiting your mark there.

003 23 38 Mattingly (onboard): Okay; that's Docking Probe Extend/Release...

003 23 38 Fullerton: Well, it - (chuckle) it just hung up. Just as I said that. Stand by.

003 23 41 Mattingly (onboard): ...supposed to do that. Let me pull those docking probe circuit breakers.

003 23 46 Young (onboard): Yeah, that's [garble].

003 23 47 Mattingly (onboard): So there's no danger.

003 23 48 Duke (onboard): Okay.

003 23 49 Mattingly (onboard): Okay, Docking Probe Main A and Main B are open.

003 23 52 Duke (onboard): Okay; Docking Probe Extend/Release, Off.

003 23 55 Young (onboard): Extend/Release, Off.

003 23 56 Duke (onboard): Docking Probe Retract, Two, Off.

003 24 00 Young (onboard): Okay...

003 24 01 Mattingly (onboard): Hey, when that thing's lined up, it's one bar width - the target is one bar ...

003 24 06 Fullerton: We'd like you to cycle the Manual back to Auto and see if that starts it back down. Over.

003 24 11 Young (onboard): For gosh sake.

003 24 14 Young: Okay, you were in Manual for about two seconds and back to Auto.

003 24 20 Mattingly (onboard): And the - it's over to the right one bar width and up one-half bar width.

003 24 25 Duke (onboard): Okay, we're ...

003 24 18 Fullerton: Okay. Okay, it's coming down now. Stand by to put it in Manual.

003 24 29 Crew (onboard): (Laughter)

003 24 30 Fullerton: Ready. Now.

003 25 26 Duke: Houston, before we turn the TV off, we gon - we want to give you a picture of the Earth.

003 25 31 Fullerton: Okay, I'll appreciate that.

003 24 32 Duke: Okay. Okay, you got it right there on the "now." (onboard): Okay; say that again, Ken.

003 24 38 Mattingly (onboard): Okay. My - the cross is one-half bar width...

003 24 41 Fullerton: I was a little slow on the "now," but leave it there for now and press on with the normal procedures.

003 24 46 Crew: (Laughter)

003 24 47 Mattingly (onboard): ...and one bar to the right of the target. Right then - right here next to my docking [garble].

003 24 56 Duke (onboard): Okay. Exterior Lights, Off.

003 25 07 Duke (onboard): Okay. Tape Recorder's Off. Going Off.

[CM Transcript ends.]

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston, at 3 hours, 27 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. That view of Earth from a distance of 7,500 nautical miles [13,890 kilometres].

003 26 40 Fullerton: Very nice picture, Charlie. We can see Southwestern United States, Lower California. Very nice.

003 26 50 Duke: Good. Ken's doing all that good work for you. It's out his window.

003 27 10 Mattingly: Gordon, is that color okay for you?

003 27 13 Fullerton: Very nice, Ken. Beautiful color.

003 27 17 Mattingly: I bet it's good, but you just can't believe how beautiful it is. See the reds in the desert down there and the Southern United States and northern part of Mexico. And from here, you see the Great Lakes and the State of Florida out there. And it's just absolutely something. We're going to go back to work, but thought you'd enjoy that.

003 27 37 Fullerton: Thank you for the picture.It's the next best thing to being up there.

003 27 49 Mattingly: And - and we might be able to get you an S-IVB later on. That's if you got room to get that kind of stuff.

003 27 59 Fullerton: Okay, we'll be waiting.

003 29 08 Fullerton: 16, Houston. We'll extend the time on commercial TV lines here if - if it looks like we'll get some good shots on the S-IVB.

003 29 19 Mattingly: Okay. I really haven't worked out the angles to tell you exactly how the Sun is going to be, but I have an idea we'll see it pretty nicely from here.

003 29 27 Fullerton: Okay, we'll stand by for it.

003 29 39 Young: Just went to Auto on O2 Heater 3, Houston. We're down to that part in the post-docking checklist.

003 29 45 Fullerton: Okay.

Public Affairs Officer: This is Apollo Control, Houston, 3 hours, 31 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Apollo 16 is presently at a distance of 8,240 nautical miles [15,269 kilometres] away from Earth. Velocity now reading 19,445 feet [5,930 metres] per second.

003 33 19 Duke: Okay, Gordy, we're down to 0.2 on the Delta - I mean, correction 2.0 on the Delta-P, and we're starting our leak check.

003 33 26 Fullerton: Thank you.

Public Affairs Officer: This is Apollo Control, Houston, at 3 hours, 36 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. We presently show Apollo 16 at a distance of 8,997 nautical miles [16,662 kilometres] away from the Earth. Velocity now reading 18,818 feet [5,736 metres] per second. Very little conversation with the crew at this time as they are in the process of removing the tunnel hatch and going through their check list prior to separation and ejection of the Lunar Module. We are at 3 hours, 37 minutes [and] continuing to monitor. This Apollo Control, Houston.

003 36 36 Duke: We're picking up again on the procedure, Gordy. Cabin pressure's down to 41.

003 36 40 Fullerton: Roger.

003 38 14 Fullerton: 16, Houston. In about 30 seconds, a couple [of] non-propulsive vents will open on the booster.

003 38 21 Duke: Okay, thank you.

003 40 18 Duke: Okay, Houston. The hatch is out.

003 40 20 Fullerton: Thank you.

Public Affairs Officer: 3 hours, 40 minutes, Ground Elapsed Time. This is Apollo Control, Houston. Charlie Duke reports the hatch is out. We presently show Apollo 16 at a distance of 9,739 nautical miles [18,036 kilometres] from Earth. Velocity now reading 18,277 feet [5,570 metres] per second.

003 43 00 Mattingly: Houston, it looks like Number 10 latch is indeed locked. Let me start by saying all the latches are locked. Number 10 is - is over the ring, but the handle isn't all the way up flush, and we're just going to leave it alone. Thought we'd just tell you about it.

003 43 17 Fullerton: Okay, Ken.

Public Affairs Officer: This is Apollo Control, Houston at 3 hours, 46 minutes of Ground Elapsed Time. Apollo 16 presently at 10,617 nautical miles [19,663 kilometres] away from the Earth.

003 47 07 Duke: Okay, Houston. The connectors are connected, and we got LM power to CSM, and the system test is okay.

003 47 14 Fullerton: Roger.

003 47 20 Duke: And, Gordy, the old Rover is right where it's supposed to be.

003 47 25 Fullerton: That's good.

003 49 03 Duke: Houston, 16.

003 49 08 Fullerton: CapCom, 16.

003 49 10 Fullerton: Roger; go ahead.

003 49 12 Duke: Okay, Gordy. So when we pitched around, I'd like to tell you a little bit about something we saw on the LM. When we were coming around out about 30 or 40 feet [9 to 12 metres] out, we had a lot of white particles. Looked like it was coming out from around the Lunar Module. Quite a number of them. And, as we got closer, it looked like to me that the primary - most of the particles were coming bet - from between the ascent propellant tank over quad one and this omni antenna. And it looks like they was being jetted out from either some outgassing or something, and we assumed it's Mylar but are not convinced of that.

003 50 05 Fullerton: We copy that, Charlie.

003 50 10 Duke: The only reason we comment on it, it just seemed like there was a awful lot of them.

003 50 15 Fullerton: Okay.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston, 3 hours, 50 minutes Ground Elapsed Time, making that report was Lunar Module Pilot, Charles Duke. In his discussion with Capcom, Gordon Fullerton, here in Mission Control.

[CM Transcript restarts.]

003 54 42 Duke (onboard): DAC six [garble] feet per second, six frames per second.

003 54 46 Mattingly (onboard): DAC's - was six frames per second, and what did you say - six feet?

003 54 50 Duke (onboard): No, just six frames per second. Okay, lo - DAP is - load the DAP, 21101.

003 55 04 Duke (onboard): And - Okay, that's go. And load Pitch trim a plus -

003 55 09 Mattingly (onboard): Okay, just [garble].

003 55 11 Duke (onboard): Plus 123.

003 55 15 Mattingly (onboard): [Garble] 123.

003 55 19 Duke (onboard): And Yaw is minus 0.2.

003 55 26 Mattingly (onboard): Okay.

003 55 27 Duke (onboard): Okay, load Noun 22 attitude maneuver - monitor - Okay, it's a 90, 325 point - load Noun 22. Pro[ceed] on that one now.

003 55 35 Mattingly (onboard):Okay.

003 55 40 Duke (onboard): Nine - plus 90 - 09000, plus 325.5 - zero, plus 355.90. Okay; Verb 60 - Verb 63.

003 56 01 Young (onboard): [Garble] set.

003 56 04 Duke (onboard): GDC align; DET, Reset.

003 56 20 Mattingly (onboard): It's Reset.

003 56 21 Duke (onboard): CB Secs Arm, two, closed.

003 56 24 Mattingly (onboard): That's affirmative. I got Secs Arm, two, close, verify.

003 56 27 Duke (onboard): Okay; that's right. Cue MSFN.

003 56 32 Young: Okay, Houston. We're ready to proceed with the Logic.

003 56 38 Fullerton: Okay, we're standing by.

003 56 40 Duke (onboard): Secs Logic, Two, On, Up.

003 56 45 Young: There's two Logics on.

003 56 47 Duke (onboard): Want me to hold the Flight Plan, Ken?

003 56 50 Fullerton: You're Go for Pyro Arm.

003 56 54 Mattingly (onboard): Okay. All right, now. Yeah. Before we get ready to get off...

003 56 59 Young: Roger, Houston.

003 57 00 Mattingly (onboard): ...there's a couple of items we need to review, so -

003 57 02 Young (onboard): Go ahead.

003 57 04 Duke (onboard): Okay; why don't we go down to that part?

003 57 05 Mattingly (onboard): Yeah.

003 57 06 Duke (onboard): Okay. Have you armed the pyros?

003 57 08 Mattingly (onboard): No, sir. Arm them.

003 57 10 Duke (onboard): Yeah.

003 57 11 Young: Here comes Pyro A.

003 57 12 Young: Mark. Pyro B.

003 57 14 Young: Mark.

003 57 16 Duke (onboard): TVC Servo Power, on - Power Number 1.

003 57 18 Young (onboard): TVC Servo Power, Number l, is AC1/Main A.

003 57 21 Duke (onboard): Trans Control Power, On, Up; verify.

003 57 23 Young (onboard): Trans Control Power's on.

003 57 24 Duke: RHC ...

003 57 24 Fullerton: Okay, they look good. [Refering to the pyros]

003 57 27 Duke (onboard): Okay, RHC and THC armed?

003 57 30 Mattingly (onboard): They're armed.

003 57 31 Duke (onboard): Okay, then call P47. Okay, what do you want to do?

003 57 35 Mattingly (onboard):Let - let's review before we get into 47.

003 57 36 Duke (onboard): Okay.

003 57 37 Mattingly (onboard): Okay. The - the thing we got to do when we get through here is I want to be sure that there's a - we're gonna come in the last thing we started and we said at the time we hit Sep, I start my clock, and - and then at ...

003 57 53 Duke (onboard): To Auto?

003 57 54 Mattingly (onboard): ...three to five seconds, I thrust for three.

003 57 55 Young (onboard): Okay.

003 57 56 Mattingly (onboard): Okay?

003 57 57 Duke (onboard): And you go to Auto - you go to - start your clock and go to Auto.

003 57 59 Mattingly (onboard): And go to Auto. At the same time, John hits the Sep.

003 58 02 Duke (onboard): Okay.

003 58 03 Mattingly (onboard): Right?

003 58 04 Young (onboard): And we'll [garble] all three of the [garble] on the line again.

003 58 06 Mattingly (onboard): Okay, and I'm going to hold my hand here. Okay; now the next thing is that I want to do this maneuver - is within 30 - at - any time after 30 seconds, I can start my maneuver.

003 58 16 Young (onboard): You got to get clear?

003 58 17 Mattingly (onboard): Yeah, 30 seconds and clear. We'll go [garble] approximately a minute. Okay. They haven't clued us to get off. I guess that's all we're waiting on. Are there any questions?

003 58 26 Duke: Houston, we got - We're ready to get off if you guys are ready.

003 58 32 Fullerton: Roger. You're Go for ejection.

003 58 34 Duke (onboard): Okay. P47.

003 58 44 Duke (onboard): EMS Mode to Normal.

003 58 46 Mattingly (onboard): [Garble] this display up here? Okay, at five, I go for three.

003 58 55 Young (onboard): All righty.

003 58 56 Duke (onboard): Okay. EMS Mode to Normal.

003 58 57 Young (onboard): It's Normal.

003 58 58 Duke (onboard): Start the DAC.

003 58 59 Young (onboard): DAC is started.

003 59 05 Mattingly (onboard): Okay. Are you all set? I'll give you a countdown. We'll go at zero. 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 -

003 59 14 Mattingly (onboard): Mark.

003 59 15 Duke (onboard): Man, there we go, man.

003 59 19 Duke: Okay, we're off, Houston.

003 59 21 Fullerton: Roger.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston. Three hours, 59 minutes; that's Charlie Duke reporting they're off the booster.

003 59 25 Young (onboard): [Garble] 2, 3, 4 [garble]. Okay, now, in a minute, we're gonna...

003 59 27 Mattingly (onboard): I guess it's gone; I can't see it anymore.

003 59 29 Duke (onboard): Well, we're not quite...

003 59 30 Young (onboard): Computer Activity light out, right?

003 59 39 Young (onboard): Okay, and [garble]. Okay and go to [garble] there.

003 59 44 Duke (onboard): Verb 49.

003 59 45 Mattingly (onboard): Oh, oh, don't - Yeah, okay. Let's go to a minute. Can you see the booster anywhere in sight?

003 59 51 Duke (onboard): No, it's gone.

003 59 52 Mattingly (onboard): Think so?

003 59 53 Duke (onboard): Yeah.

003 59 54 Mattingly (onboard): Okay, I got my BMAGs caged. All off.

003 59 57 Duke (onboard): Okay [garble].

003 59 59 Mattingly (onboard):All righty. I'm ready.

004 00 00 Duke (onboard): Okay.

004 00 01 Mattingly (onboard): Enter. Pro[ceed]. Is that the right attitude?

004 00 05 Duke (onboard): Yeah.

004 00 06 Mattingly (onboard): Okay.

004 00 07 Duke (onboard): Confirm that.

004 00 08 Mattingly (onboard): All righty. Go.

004 00 09 Duke (onboard): Okay. SECS Pyro Arm, Two, Safe.

004 00 10 Mattingly (onboard): Okay, looks good.

004 00 14 Duke (onboard): [Garble]. CMC [garble] manoeuver?

004 00 18 Young (onboard): Yeah.

004 00 19 Duke (onboard): Yeah.

004 00 20 Mattingly (onboard): Okay.

004 00 21 Duke (onboard): Do you have your pyro ...

004 00 22 Mattingly (onboard): Your Pyro Arms are Two going to Safe.

004 00 23 Duke (onboard): Okay, SECS Logic, Two, Off.

004 00 24 Mattingly (onboard): SECS Logic, Two, Off.

004 O0 26 Duke (onboard): CB, SECS Arm, Two, Open.

004 00 29 Mattingly (onboard): SECS Arm, l, 2, Open. There's another strap.

004 00 34 Duke (onboard): S-IVB/LM Sep - Okay, I'll [garble].

004 00 42 Young (onboard): Okay, LM Sep, two, open.

004 00 44 Duke (onboard): I got them. Okay. The O2 Tank Isol Valve is gray.

004 00 48 Young (onboard): Okay. It says O2 Tank 3 Isol valve talkback gray.

004 00 49 Mattingly (onboard): Hey, what - did - didn't we...

004 00 55 Young (onboard): Mapping Camera On switch is supposed to go to Off.

004 00 57 Mattingly (onboard): 21101. And it doesn't look like we're yawing enough. Oh, I know what it is.

004 01 06 Duke (onboard): Mapping Camera, On, to Off.

004 01 09 Young (onboard): [Garble].

004 01 12 Mattingly (onboard): We - we left it in the - no, you put a 63 in there. But, boy, that's [garble].

004 01 18 Young (onboard): All right.

004 01 20 Duke (onboard): What do we do?

004 01 21 Young (onboard): Mapping Camera On should be Off.

004 01 23 Duke (onboard): I got it. Pan camera ...

004 01 24 Young (onboard): Pan Camera Power should be Off. Service Module/AC Power should be Off.

004 01 29 Duke (onboard): Well, I can't [garble].

004 01 30 Young (onboard): I can get that one.

004 01 32 Mattingly: Okay, Houston. We're doing our maneuver, and we'll tell you as soon as we have a visual.

004 01 40 Duke (onboard): Which way should it come out of?

004 01 42 Mattingly (onboard):Well, that's why I got this ....

004 01 41 Fullerton: Okay, Ken.

004 01 44 Mattingly (onboard): ...ball set here. We have to get rid of that thing.

004 01 47 Young (onboard): Yeah.

004 01 48 Mattingly (onboard): It floated [garble]...

004 01 49 Duke (onboard): That's John's.

004 01 50 Mattingly (onboard): ...[garble] pain in the neck.

004 01 51 Young (onboard): Sorry.

004 01 52 Mattingly (onboard): Oh, here it is.

004 01 53 Young (onboard): It is a pain.

004 01 54 Mattingly (onboard): Okay; we have rolled right 20 degrees.

004 02 O1 Duke (onboard): Man, we fired some jets, I'll tell you.

004 02 03 Young (onboard): [Garble]?

004 02 04 Duke (onboard): Yeah, you can see those Mylar particles getting blown off of the [garble].

004 02 08 Mattingly (onboard): Rolling to 90 - Oh, you can feel this thing kind of ...

004 02 11 Young (onboard): Service Module/AC Power to Off.

[Break in CM Transcript until 008 00 58]

004 03 43 Mattingly: Okay, Houston. The post-LM injection - ejection checklist is complete.

004 03 51 Fullerton: Roger. And, for your information, we're unable to get lines from Goldstone to Houston for live TV; however, we're going to record any TV you give us for later playback. Over.

004 04 05 Mattingly: We'll do it for you.

Public Affairs Officer: This is Apollo Control, Houston. 4 hours, 5 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Our displays presently show Apollo 16 at 13,310 nautical miles [24,650 kilometres] away from the Earth. Velocity now reading 1,683 feet [512.97 metres] per second. [Again, the PAO is incorrectly stating the display readings - the true speed should be aronnd 16,000 feet or 4800 metres per second].

004 07 44 Mattingly: Houston, Casper is out of his bag; and we got the S-IVB in the window. And the TV is transmitting pictures of it now, and if you want to do your maneuver with it, we're well clear.

004 08 03 Fullerton: Okay, we copy a Go for the S-IVB maneuver.

004 08 11 Mattingly: That's the attitude maneuver we're talking about.

004 08 16 Fullerton: They'll start the maneuver about 4:10 GET.

004 08 24 Mattingly: Okay.

004 09 37 Fullerton: 16, your TV down-link looks good out at the site; however, we can't see it here in Houston live.

004 09 45 Mattingly: Okay. Well we're still adjusting the - all those good things.

004 09 49 Fullerton: Okay.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston. We're 4 hours, 10 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. That was Ken Mattingly responding to Capcom Gordon Fullerton. We now show Apollo 16 at a distance from Earth of 14,005 nautical miles [25,937 kilometres] with a velocity reading 15,751 feet [4,746 metres] per second. [The] Booster Systems engineer reports the yaw maneuver is in progress.

004 10 23 Fullerton: The S-IVB maneuver - attitude maneuver is in progress now.

004 10 32 Mattingly: Roger. We can see it maneuvering. I tell you, they never make movies like these.

004 10 44 Fullerton: I [garble].

004 11 19 Fullerton: We'd like Auto Track on the High Gain, please.

004 11 27 Duke: You got it.

004 11 30 Fullerton: Thank you.

004 12 18 Mattingly: Gordy, we've - we lost the monitor picture, and we're gonna try to power the TV set down, and we're gonna check all the connections, and it's got a lot of horizontal lines. And you really can't even make out the image. It started out okay, and then while John was taking a picture, it - the monitor picture went out. So we're gonna try to take a look at it. It's got a whole bunch of horizontal lines.

004 12 40 Fullerton: Okay, we'll go to ...

004 12 41 Mattingly: It looks like maybe multiple images.

004 12 44 Fullerton: We'll go to the site. Standby.

004 14 24 Fullerton: 16, Houston. The maneuver is complete. We're standing by for your Go for the evasive burn.

004 14 30 Mattingly: Okay, stand by one.

004 15 16 Mattingly: Okay, Gordy, we're all set. It looks like it's almost 90 degrees to us.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston. 4 hours, 14 minutes. That was Command Module Pilot Ken Mattingly talking about the television. We now show Apollo 16 at a distance of 14,416 nautical miles [26,698 kilometres], velocity now reads 15,543 feet [4,737 metres] per second.

004 15 20 Fullerton: Okay. On the TV problem, we had a good picture out at the site there at the first, but then we started losing signal strength, which would - doesn't really tell us whether anything is wrong with your monitor set or not.

004 15 35 Mattingly: Okay. Well, we're gonna take pictures like it's working, and you can check it out later.

004 15 39 Fullerton: Okay.

004 15 40 Mattingly: And we are all set.

004 15 42 Fullerton: Roger.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston at 4 hours, 16 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. [The] Booster Systems engineer reports he will start with the evasive burn of the S-IVB at 4 hours, 18 minutes Ground Elapsed Time.

004 16 44 Fullerton: 16, Houston. Goldstone says they're getting a good picture, and so your trouble is worth the effort there, and we'll start the evasive burn at 4:18 even.

004 16 59 Mattingly: Okay, Gordy, thank you. We got another spectacular view of the Earth down here. The polar ice cap. We can see the whole sphere, and the United States is absolutely spectacular.

004 17 14 Fullerton: How about that.

004 17 19 Young: And out the other side, we've got a crescent Moon.

004 17 22 Mattingly: In fact, you can see Lake Mead, Gordy; very clearly.

004 17 27 Fullerton: No kidding?

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston. 4 hours, 17 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Apollo 16 now 15,039 nautical miles [27,852 kilometres] away from the Earth. Velocity now reading 15,272 feet [4,655 metres] per second.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston; 4 hours, 18 minutes. The booster systems engineer indicates he has initiated the evasive burn that's one minute, 20 seconds in duration.

004 19 03 Young: We can see her moving away now, Gordon, and she's just slowly picking up a little speed there. Only way you can tell it's moving is against the - the particles in the background. I don't think you can see those on TV, but it's - it looks like there's a million stars out behind the S-IVB as it moves off.

004 19 22 Fullerton: Roger, John.

004 19 36 Fullerton: Now the evasive burn is complete, now.

004 19 39 Young: And - Roger. And as she moves out of sight, the old Apollo 16 crew would really like to express their thanks and appreciation to the guys at the Marshall Space Flight Center that give such a phenomenal ride. Not to mention the Boeing Company on the First Stage, North American on the Second, McDAC on the Third, IBM on the IU. It was superb all the way.

004 20 05 Fullerton: Okay, John, I'll speak to them. Thank you.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston at 4 hours, 20 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. That was spacecraft commander John Young expressing his appreciation of the Saturn V team.

004 20 25 Young: And you might relay to old Mike Waush, thanks a lot for his help. We know he's leaving, and we're sure glad we didn't have to use any of that training he gave us.

004 20 34 Fullerton: Okay, we'll sure do that. He's just about to walk out the door.

Public Affairs Officer: 4 hours, 21 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Mike Waush has worked with the Apollo flight crews in the training of these crews for the powered phase of launch and also...

004 21 03 Young: Gordy, up off - looks like Alaska - up maybe a little farther north - is a pretty good swirl pattern. Looks like a pretty good storm up there.

004 21 15 Fullerton: Thank you.

Public Affairs Officer: During the powered phase of flight Mike Waush is always positioned right next to the Capsule Communicator.

004 21 56 Fullerton: Apollo 16, here is a word from the auxiliary CapCom here.

004 22 01 Waush: Good luck, you fellows. Take it easy, and hope everything works out all right.

004 22 06 Young: Kind words, Mike. Thank you.

004 22 11 Waush: Say again?

004 22 12 Young: Thank you for all your trouble. We sure enjoyed working with you.

004 22 15 Waush: It was certainly my pleasure, John; thank you a lot. Good-bye and good luck.

004 22 19 Young: Thank you, now.

Public Affairs Officer: The voice you just heard was Mike Waush who is being transferred to the Ames Research Center. We are at 4 hours, 23 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. We show Apollo 16 at a distance of 15,707 nautical miles [29,089 kilometres]away from the Earth. Velocity now reading 14,972 feet  [4,563 metres] per second.

004 24 28 Young: Okay and the - the S-IVB has drifted maybe half a mile away now, so we went ahead and turned off the tube.

004 24 37 Fullerton: Okay.

004 25 26 Fullerton: John, just before you turned the mon - the TV off, was the monitor still giving you trouble?

004 25 31 Young: That's affirmative.

004 25 33 Fullerton: Okay, thank you.

004 25 35 Young: I guess it's about time for a little Verb 49 to the P52 attitude. How's that suit you?

004 25 42 Fullerton: Sounds good.

004 26 02 Mattingly: Gordy, the - I can't get over the view of that Earth. None of the pictures just do it justice. Absolutely beautiful.

004 26 12 Fullerton: We're kind of getting the idea that you're impressed.

004 26 16 Young: Man, the thing about it, Gordy, is that the whole Southern United States, Mexico, and that - and - and Florida and Cuba and the Virgin Islands down that way - they're all clear of clouds. It's just fantastic!

004 26 32 Fullerton: Did you take some good pictures?

004 26 36 Young: Got some.

004 26 38 Mattingly: The way we're going, we may have to get a reload before we get to the Moon.

004 26 41 Young: As a matter of fact, you can see as far north as Lake Michigan and Lake Superior.

004 26 48 Fullerton: Sounds great.

004 26 52 Duke: And all the way down past the Yucatan and - and into the Central America.

004 32 02 Mattingly: Houston, we've got the cabin back up some now, and our LM/CM Delta-P gauge is reading 0.6, and that's probably due to that Delta[-P] on the cabin. And the O2 Flow Hight light has gone out, so things are getting back to normal.

004 32 16 Fullerton: Okay.

004 33 32 Mattingly: And, Houston, we've done a LM/CM Delta-P; and at time four hours and 30 minutes, we had a plus 0.6.

004 33 41 Fullerton: Roger.

004 34 44 Mattingly: Houston, we're going to take the Waste Stowage valve to Vent [at] this time.

004 34 49 Fullerton: Roger, Ken.

[Break in CM transcript until 004 39 52]

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston, at 4 hours, 37 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Our space digital display in Mission Control [is] presently using the Moon as a reference and we show that Apollo 16 is 174,639 nautical miles [323,431 kilometres] away from the Moon. At 4 hours, 37 minutes, continuing to monitor. This is Apollo Control, Houston.

004 39 52 Fullerton: Apollo 16, Houston. Don't know if you can see it or not, but we've started the Lox dump on the S-IVB.

004 40 01 Duke: We lost it a little while ago, Gordy.

004 40 03 Fullerton: Roger.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston. 4 hours, 40 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. The booster systems engineer reports that the lox dump has been completed with the S-IVB. We're at 4 hours, 41 minutes Ground Elapsed Time, continuing to monitor. This is Apollo Control, Houston.

004 41 07 Duke: Houston, are you ready for us to start charging Battery B?

004 41 17 Fullerton: Okay, we're Go for the battery charge on B, and we'd also like you to dial in the Flight Plan high-gain angles, minus 47 and 98, and go to Reacq[uire].

004 41 29 Duke: Okay, you got the angles, and you're going to Reacq[uire].

004 41 31 Duke: Mark.

004 45 46 Duke: Houston, 16.

004 45 48 Fullerton: Go ahead.

004 45 50 Duke: Okay, we got Bat B charging, and it says volts should be 37 to 39, and I'm looking at 33.

004 46 04 Fullerton: Okay.

004 46 25 Fullerton: Charlie, we got - we figured about 8 amp-hours out of that battery, so it'll be a while yet before the voltage gets back up, and EECOM thinks that's okay.

004 46 37 Duke: Okay, fine.

004 47 22 Young: Houston, we got 3.4 on 7A. We're gonna vent - we gonna vent the battery to zero, if that's okay.

004 47 31 Fullerton: Stand by.

004 47 41 Fullerton: We'd like you to hold on that a minute.

004 47 47 Young: You're too late, we just vented it.

004 48 00 Young: Okay, it's reading about 0.2 right now.

004 48 05 Fullerton: Roger.

004 48 06 Young: Say again, 0.4.

004 48 09 Fullerton: 0.4.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston; 4 hours, 50 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. The space digitals display is still using the Moon as a reference. We presently show Apollo 16 at a distance of 172 - 173,082 nautical miles [320,548 kilometres] away from the Moon. Continuing to monitor. This is Apollo Control, Houston.

004 50 51 Mattingly: Houston, got a couple of comments on the EMS for G&C, whenever he has a break.

004 50 59 Fullerton: They're all ears; go ahead.

004 51 03 Mattingly: That must look funny. Okay. We been running null bias tests here for - well, since we got in orbit - each time the checklist calls for it. On the first one, we found that in our hundred-second check, it gained 2.5; then, just before docking, it got 2.6; and I just ran another one, and I have 2.8. And I don't really know what you can do with that, but I just thought I'd go ahead and tell you about that's the magnitude of what we're looking at.

004 51 34 Young: Okay, and our first rough guess as to how the SCS GDC system is performing, it looks like it's well within spec in pitch, yaw, and roll, as far as its drift measurements go.

004 51 50 Fullerton: Okay, Ken and John, we got that.

004 53 15 Fullerton: 16, Houston. Whenever you're ready, we're ready to load the PTC REFSMMAT.

004 53 23 Mattingly: Okay, you have P00 and Accept.

004 53 28 Fullerton: Okay.

004 54 19 Fullerton: Ken, sorry about that. We didn't get coordinated here. We don't have an up-link site, so go back to Block until after 5 hours, and we'll try it again then.

004 54 29 Mattingly: All righty. They're back in UpTel to Block. And we're going to be kind of hanging up here for a while anyhow, while we get our suits off. It - it turns out to be a pretty interesting operation with these new B-suits.

004 54 46 Fullerton: Roger.

004 54 50 Mattingly: I'll tell you, Gordy, there were some sights out there that were really something. One of the - one of the things that - most things happened like people had said they would. But there were a couple of things that I had never seen or heard anyone even mention, and maybe they'd been on - been there all along. But one of the things that was really nifty was, while we were in powered flight, both in later stages of the boost and during the TLI burn, there were particles that I could see out the window that were going past us in the plus-X direction, and I kept thinking that that was an optical illusion, and I kept going back and looking at it again, and sure enough! And these were after we were in steady state. It wasn't around any kind of a staging event or anything that I was aware of.

004 55 37 Fullerton: Oh, how about that. I haven't heard of that one before.

004 55 43 Mattingly: Then when we - when we scooted out here and you started your nonpropulsive vent, we could see - First, it just looked like it was a little mist around the outside when you looked at the Sun. And then the Sun hit it at such an angle that you started getting a spectral reflection, and it looked like a rainbow out over the LM. And then after that, you could look out my Number 1 window, and apparently the lighting was just right so that it - it had the appearance of light streaming off to a point source at infinity. There was a little blank spot in it at the - at what looked like the origin. And then all these streaks were coming back towards you, like you were right in the center of a cone. And these things would change colors. They go to a light - light purple, and then they'd have a little sandy color to them. That was another one that I don't remember ever hearing before, and it was - maybe it was just the lighting on it, but it sure was pretty.

004 56 46 Fullerton: Roger. Enjoying the description.

004 56 53 Mattingly: I'll tell you, you can't wait too many years to make this worth it.

004 56 59 Fullerton: Roger.

004 57 03 Young: Gordy, on that boost, that S-IC is a real freight train. I'll tell you, boy. I can't get over that.

004 57 11 Fullerton: Roger.

004 57 14 Mattingly: Could you folks see that thing on the TV up through staging?

004 57 20 Fullerton: I didn't watch it all the way until it went out of sight. I'll have to check here.

004 57 32 Fullerton: Yeah, I guess we saw even [the LES] tower jett.

004 57 38 Duke: Good show. John's in the middle of his suit doff.

004 57 43 Fullerton: Okay.

Public Affairs Officer: We're at four hours,58 minutes, Ground Elapsed Time. Most of that long discription coming from Ken Mattingly, how -

004 57 52 Mattingly: And thanks to good old Stu Roosa's suggestion, we wrote in the Flight Plan to be sure and take a look at the fires out there in Africa as we went over, which is something we probably would have forgotten or never even thought about. And they are just as beautiful as everybody's ever said they could be. They're just all over the place. Ail these little - little yellowish-red dots down there. And therecwas some - looked like some low overcast in parts of the area, or maybe it was - from our altitude, maybe it was a high overcast. But it just gave - It looked like looking at the lights of a city through fog, and then there were others that were lear. Just something well worth remembering to look for.

004 58 32 Fullerton: Roger. We'll be sure to remind Ron to look for that one.

004 58 43 Mattingly: I tell you, God didn't equip us with enough eyes to see everything that there is to see in the first hour.

004 58 51 Fullerton: Roger.

Public Affairs Officer: Apollo Control, Houston. 4 hours, 59 minutes. That last remark coming from Command Module Pilot Ken Mattingly. Our space digital display still using the moon as a reference. We show Apollo 16 172,048 nautical miles [318,633 kilometres] away from the moon.

004 59 26 Mattingly: Gordy, it looks like this whole operation may take us longer than - than we had guessed. Is there any thermal constraint on getting a 52 attitude and going to those other attitudes? Looks like [garble].

004 59 41 Fullerton: I'll cheek on that, Ken. We're about...

004 59 42 Mattingly: ...but I just wondered if that's something we ought, to keep in mind.

004 59 47 Fullerton: Okays. we're about to a handover here. I'll check on that and come back to you through Hawaii.

004 59 51 Mattingly: Okay, thank you.

005 00 46 Fullerton: 16, we're - through Hawaii now. And you're scheduled in this attitude through 7 hours or - at least, so no problem thermally, and you're not even due to do the P52 for another half hour, so you're plenty ahead.

005 01 03 Mattingly: Okay, that P52 - We're going to come to a decision point; here pretty soon, whether to - you want us to do that and we'll pick up the suit doffing after that, or we - I'd just as soon go ahead and do the - get all the suits out of the way. And we can do the 52 on schedule, or we can do it after we get the suits off. Does it make any difference to you folks ?

005 01 24 Fullerton: Let me check.

005 01 56 Fullerton: If that's what you'd like to do, why don't you go ahead with the - finish up the suits. No problem slipping the 52 a little bit. And we'd like P00 and Accept for that up-link.

005 02 08 Young: Okay, there's P00 and Accept. Is Fredo still around there?

005 02 18 Fullerton: No, he went home about a half hour ago.

005 05 28 Fullerton: 16, Houston. The computer is yours.

Public Affairs Officer: This is Apollo Control, Houston at 5 hours, 10 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Our displays still show the Moon as our reference so we show Apollo 16 at a distance of 170,878 nautical miles away [316,466 kilometres] from the Moon and we've had no conversation for a while with the crew of Apollo 16. We suspect they are in the process of doffing their space suits and later preparation for their eat period which is scheduled to begin at six hours Ground Elapsed Time. Five hours, 10 minutes Ground Elapsed Time, this is Apollo Control, Houston.

Public Affairs Officer: This is Apollo Control, Houston at five hours 30 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Our space digital display now using the Earth reference. We show Apollo 16 at 23,892 nautical miles away from the Earth. Velocity now reading 12,295 feet [3,747 metres] per second.

Public Affairs Officer: This is Apollo Control, Houston at 5 hours, 44 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. We presently show Apollo 16 at a distance of 25,488 nautical miles [46,204 kilometres] away from the Earth. Velocity now reading 11,945 feet [3,504 metres] per second. Very shortly in Mission Control we will have the change of shift - or shift change over of the Gene Kranz team of flight controllers will be replaced by the Pete Franks team of flight controllers. We're at 5 hours, 45 minutes and continuing to monitor. This is Apollo Control, Houston.

Public Affairs Officer: This is Apollo Control, Houston; 5 hours, 50 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. We presently show Apollo 16 at a distance of 26,143 nautical miles [48,417 kilometres] away from the Earth. And traveling at a velocity of 11,796 feet [3,595 metres] per second. We're continuing with our shift turnover in the Mission Control Center at the present time. Pete Franks' team of Orange Flight Controllers coming aboard replacing the Gene Kranz team of White Flight Controllers. We estimate the start time of our change in shift news conference 6 to 6:15 p.m. Central Standard Time. The news conference will involve Flight Director Gene Kranz, CapCom astronaut Gordon Fullerton and booster systems engineer Frank Van Rensselaer. This news conference will be held in the news center briefing auditorium - in the news center briefing auditorium instead of the large public affairs auditorium. We are at 5 hours, 51 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. This is Apollo Control, Houston.

006 03 54 Duke: Hello, Houston; 16. John and I are back up now.

006 04 00 Fullerton: Roger. That up-link is complete. In case you didn't hear me some time ago, the computer is yours.

006 04 l0 Young: Okay, we're in Block.

006 04 12 Fullerton: Roger.

006 04 13 Young: And it took us about an hour for me and Charlie to climb out of those suits and stow them. It's really something.

006 04 23 Fullerton: Roger.

[Removal and stowage of the A-7LB spacesuits was discussed by John Young, Ken Mattingly and Charlie Duke during the 1972 post-mission debrief:

Young: Climbing out or that suit is really something.

Mattingly: We had a hard time getting the suits into the suit gag because we were trying to be careful of them. I don't know if taking our pockets off would have helped us or not.

Young: Taking the pockets off is another 10 or 15 minutes per suit. The way they put those things on they're on there to stay. The best way to get them off is to cut them off.

Mattingly: The only point I'm making is that I have stowed suits in the bag in stowage exercises and it's a not a big deal.

Young: It's entirely different n flight and I think there are couple of things that are different. One is the suits which we stowed here [on Earth] never had the pockets and all the paraphenalia straps on. The other thing is you have a old beat up suit that's a rag. You don't care if you step on it, kick it, or what you do to it but when you re on your way to the Moon, you're being ginger with those things.

Mattingly: The bag is just too small for the suits.

Young: Here's something I feel pretty strong about. We haven't had any problems so far but I think that the crews that are going to have to take these suits off and stow them in a bag should be given a demonstration on how to properly roll up and stow an A-7LB pressure suit by a suit technician close to launch so they don't forget what they've learned. Course, that's just another square to fill close to launch. If you damage that suit by stowing it in that bag, and I can see how you could do that because you wouldn't believe the kind of kicking, grunting, shoving and heaving you have to do in zero g to get that suit in there, and if you damage it, there goes your mission because you can't fix it.

Mattingly: I think that you should point out, we only stowed two suits in a three-suit bag.

Young: Yes. We only put two suits in there. We got three suits in there on the way back and then found out that we weren't supposed to have three suits in there. We were supposed to stow one of them under the couch. And, we only put two in there on the way out. We stowed Ken's suit undernearth the left couch. But, I was always concerned that maybe we had folded a suit in the wrong direction and put some undue strain on the zipper. We had zipped the zipper up, but we hadn't zipped the pressure sealing zipper up all the way. But we zipped the restraint zipper all the way up and we put the neck ring's dust cover on it.

Mattingly: I think it's a shame to take a chance on the suits on your way to the Moon. I think you should make that bag bigger.

Young: There's about this much room between the bag and the front hatch which is not used and I don't see why they don't make that big enough so that a guy is not ruining his EVA by stowing his pressure suit. Now, maybe the CSD people will come back and say you can't hurt those pressure suits. But if I know Ed Smiley, I reckon he feels that way about it, probably.

Mattingly: Well, the other thing is, when you fold these on the ground and you got one g helping you pull it up into a little ball. In flight, it is whatever you could get with your arms.

Young: The other problem is that J-mission spacecraft, with those boxes under you, only one man can get in there to do the job at any one time,You can't get two men in the space to push the suit right. Well, it was of some concern to me in that we were treating suits properly when we stowed them that first time.We set a new world record for suit donning and doffing in zero gravity and 1/6-gravity seven times, something I would just as soon not have,we were behind the first day. We didn't have enough time in the timeline to doff the suits and stow them, we didn't have any time in there with one man in the middle of suit doffing, another man is handicapped because he's helping. So, that leaves one man to mind the store.

Mattingly: We actually had time in the Flight Plan for doffing the suits. We just didn't have adequate time. We had an hour or less and we used almost one hour on the first suit.]

006 05 19 Fullerton: 16, Houston.

006 05 23 Young: Go ahead, Gordon.

006 05 25 Fullerton: I'm going to hand over to Pete here. He's coming on with a good boost there. He's got a bunch of - P37 pad and a bunch of Flight Plan updates for you when you get somebody free to do some stenographic work there. Enjoyed the first six hours. Hope the rest of it goes as well.

006 05 50 Young: Gordon, that was beautiful. Tell Flight and the guys down in the trenches, "Man, that was super!"

006 05 55 Fullerton: Okay.

[At this point there is a shift change in Mission Control, with the Orange Team under Pete Frank taking over control. The new CapCom is Donald Peterson. "Pete" Peterson joined the astronaut corps in 1969, but did not fly until the sixth Shuttle mission in 1983.]

006 13 01 Duke: Okay, Houston; 16 here. We're ready to copy the Flight Plan updates.

006 13 14 Peterson: Roger, 16. At 11 hours in the flight plan.

006 13 20 Young: Stand by.

006 13 32 Young: Okay; go ahead.

006 13 33 Peterson: Roger. At 11 hours, we want to delete "Waste Stowage Vent valve, Close;" and, at 12:15, we will add "Waste Stowage Vent valve, Close."

006 13 50 Young: Okay; copy add at 12:15 "Waste Stowage Vent valve, Close."

006 13 53 Peterson: Roger. And delete it at 11.

006 14 24 Young: Okay; go ahead.

006 14 26 Peterson: Roger. Then we've got the change to the CSM Experiments/EVA Checklist having to do with the ultraviolet filter. UV filter apparently did not meet the specs, and we're going to have to make some changes to the exposures at - on several different pages in the checklist.

006 14 56 Young: We'll wait on that; we don't have that checklist out yet, Pete.

006 15 00 Peterson: Okay; and I've got P37 block data.

006 15 12 Young: Stand by.

006 16 14 Young: Okay, Pete, go ahead with the P37 block data.

006 16 16 Peterson: Okay. Lift-off plus 15. It's 015:00; 5493; minus 165; 046:40.

006 16 40 Young: Roger; copy. 015:00; 5493; minus 165; 046:40. Over.

006 16 50 Peterson: Roger. That's correct, Johnny.

006 16 55 Young: Is that all?

006 16 57 Peterson: Yeah [garble] that's all.

006 16 59 Young: Okay. How's the midcourse [correction] looking?

006 17 05 Peterson: Stand by one. We're still looking at it; it looks pretty good right now.

Public Affairs Officer: This is Apollo control. We've now completed our shift hand over in Mission control. Flight Director Pete Frank and the Orange Team of Flight Controllers. The CapCom on this shift is astronaut Donald Peterson. We have a change of shift press briefing scheduled to begin momentarily in the MSC News Center briefing room as is our normal practice during change of shift briefings we will have the air to ground line down and we'll be recording any conservations with the crew for playback following the press conference. The coming eight hours or so should be a relatively quiet time for the crew. The booster engineer has pretty well taken care of all activities with the Saturn V third stage of the S-IVB [sic - means S-IVB third stage of the Saturn V]. That vehicle is now gradually separating from the spacecraft [and] tumbling slowly. This is to maintain the proper thermal equilibrium and also to kind of neutralize out any changes in velocity added or subtracted by small ventings from any of the tanks. A normal procedure with the S-IVB.

Public Affairs Officer: The crew is scheduled to begin a eat period and as we passed up to Charlie Duke we do not expect to have Midcourse Correction 1 based on the current tracking data. At 6 hours, 19 minutes, Apollo 16 is traveling at a velocity of 11,159 feet [3,401 metres] per second now, 29,187 nautical miles [54,054 kilometres] from Earth. This is Apollo Control, Houston.

Public Affairs Officer: This is Apollo Control at 6 hours 41 minutes. During the change of shift briefing we accumulated a small amount of tape conversations which we'll play back for you at this time. And then continue to stand by live following that tape playback.

006 31 15 Young: Houston, now have Noun 93; are you happy?

006 31 22 Peterson: In a minute, 16.

006 31 30 Peterson: Okay, 16. You can go ahead and program.

006 39 53 Peterson: 16, Houston.

006 39 57 Young: Go ahead.

006 39 58 Peterson: Roger. Just wanted to remind you that, before you start the UV photography, we've got to change all the exposures.

006 40 05 Young: Okay.

006 43 01 Duke: Pete, 16 here. Go ahead with the update. Give me a page number for the UV, and we'll update the filter settings.

006 43 09 Peterson: Okay; we've got a whole bunch of pages. We'll start on 2-16.

006 43 17 Mattingly: Okay; go ahead.

006 43 18 Peterson: Under item 4, we want to change from "20 seconds - 2 frames" to "2 seconds - 2 frames."

006 43 31 Duke: Okay; keep going.

006 43 32 Peterson: Okay; on page 2-17. Item 4, "20 seconds - 2 frames," change to "1/15 second - 2 frames."

006 43 50 Peterson: Page 2 ...

006 43 51 Duke: Okay; 2-16 - 2-16, line 4, "20 seconds" to "2 seconds,'' and 2-17, same line is "1/15" versus "20 seconds."

006 43 59 Peterson: That's affirmative. And on page 2-19, we want to change shutter - under item 5 - we want to change "Shutter 1/15 - 2 frames" to "Shutter 1 - 2 frames."

006 44 17 Duke: Okay; "Shutter 1/15" went to "Shutter 1 - 2 frames."

006 44 21 Peterson: Roger. On page 2-21, we have change from "Shutter 1/15 - 2 frames," to "Shutter 1 - 2 frames."

006 44 34 Duke: Okay. That's item 2?

006 44 39 Peterson: Affirmative; that's item 2.

006 44 43 Duke: Okay; that was "Shutter 1" vice "1/15."

006 44 47 Peterson: Affirmative. And on page 2-22, item 2, change "Shutter 1/15 - 2 frames" to "Shutter 1/2 - 2 frames."

006 45 02 Duke: Copy; 1/2.

006 45 04 Peterson: On page 2-23, item 4, "20 seconds - 2 frames" to "2 seconds - 2 frames."

006 45 16 Duke: Okay, copy.

006 45 17 Peterson: And on page 2-24, under "At T start plus 7 minutes", change "20 seconds - 2 frames" to "1/15 seconds - 2 frames."

006 45 32 Duke: Can you say where that is again?

006 45 35 Peterson: Okay, it's on page 2-24, and it's under the heading that says "At T start plus 7 minutes." >

006 45 41 Duke: Okay. What was it? I'm sorry; I got all of that, but didn't get what it was.

006 45 46 Peterson: Okay. It's change "20 seconds - 2 frames" to "1/15 second - 2 frames."

006 45 55 Duke: Okay, copy.

006 45 58 Peterson: Okay, on page 2-36 - about 1/3 of the way down the page where it says "Configure lens f/8,1/30, 4" - We want to change that to "Configure lens 1/2 stop between f/5.6 and f/8, 1/15, and."

006 46 35 Duke: Okay, that's 1/2 stop between f/5.6 and f/8, and the shutter to 1/157

006 46 42 Peterson: That's affirmative, Charlie.

006 46 49 Peterson: And on that same page, about 2/3 of the way down, under the step that says "Electrophoresis Power, On," we want to add a note to hold for instructions from MSFN.

006 47 13 Duke: Okay, understand hold for instructions from MSFN. Is that before the Power, On?

006 47 19 Peterson: Negative. That's immediately after Power, On, and I won't read you that instruction now; we'll wait until we get to that in the Flight Plan.

006 47 25 Duke: Okay.

006 50 21 Peterson: 16, Houston.

00650 27 Young: Go ahead, Pete.

006 50 30 Peterson: Right, John. This Verb 49 that's at seven hours in the Flight Plan, we want you to hold up on that so we can have a look at the attitude.

006 56 22 Peterson: 16, Houston. We had a temporary very short loss of comm there. Did you do anything on board to return comm?

006 56 31 Young: We haven't touched a thing there, Pete.

006 56 34 Peterson: Roger. Everything seems okay now. It was very brief, but we lost it for awhile.

006 56 39 Young: Okay. We didn't even hear any squelch or any of that noise...

006 56 44 Peterson: Roger.

006 56 45 Young: ... like you usually get when you lose comm.

006 56 48 Peterson: Roger. Understand.

006 57 42 Peterson: 16, Houston. The attitude in the Flight Plan for the Verb 49 is okay. You can go ahead with it.

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