SCIENCE, AERONAUTICS AND TECHNOLOGY 
 

                             FISCAL YEAR 1996 ESTIMATES 
 

                                   BUDGET SUMMARY 
 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS                                                EDUCATION PROGRAMS 
 

                         SUMMARY OF RESOURCES REQUIREMENTS 
 
                                                                                          

                                      FY 1994            FY 1995            FY 1996	
                                                 (Thousands of Dollars) 
 
Student programs                       10,700             11,200             11,200     
Teacher/faculty.                       12,000             14,300             15,500    
Systemic change                        26,500             26,400             29,500      
Education technology                    5,100              3,900              4,200     
Evaluation                                 --                500              1,000     

 
	Total                          54,300             56,300             61,400 
 

Distribution of Program Amount by Installation   
 

Johnson Space Center                      285                295                322 
Kennedy Space Center                      120                124                135 
Marshall Space Flight Center            1,472              1,526              1,664 
Stennis Space Center                      845                876                955 
Ames Research Center                      646                670                731 
Langley Research Center	                  413                428                467 
Lewis Research Center                   1,362              1,412              1,540 
Goddard Space Flight Center               421                468                510 
Jet Propulsion Laboratory                 597                619                675 
Headquarters                           48,139             49,882             54,401 
	 

	Total                          54,300             56,300             61,400 
 
 
 

                                            SCIENCE, AERONAUTICS AND TECHNOLOGY 
 

                                                 FISCAL YEAR 1996 ESTIMATES 
 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS                                                                   EDUCATION PROGRAMS 
 

PROGRAM GOALS 
 

The goal of NASA’s academic programs is to promote excellence in the United States’ education system through enhancing and 
expanding scientific and technological competence.  This is in keeping with the Administration’s Goals 2000: Educate America 
agenda and in support of three of the National Goals for Education, relating to competency in challenging subject matter, 
achievement in science and mathematics, and science and technology literacy for responsible citizenship. 
 

STRATEGY FOR ACHIEVING GOALS 
 

NASA’s Education programs use NASA’s unique mission and results to capture and channel student interest in science, engineering, 
mathematics and technology, as well as enhance teacher and faculty knowledge and skills related to these subjects.  These 
programs reach students in the pre-college grades, with workshops for teachers to enhance their content knowledge, especially in 
aeronautics, sciences, engineering and technology, as well as opportunities for students to explore their interest in science, 
mathematics, engineering and technology.  At the Undergraduate and Graduate level, programs are geared to providing 
opportunities for students and faculty to participate in NASA-sponsored research activities at NASA Field Centers.  NASA has 
actively supported efforts of the education community to implement voluntary national education standards in mathematics and 
science by: 1)developing standards based supplemental curriculum materials based on the NASA mission; 2) increasing the number 
and duration of teacher enhancement workshops, emphasizing standards based scientific content and pedagogy;  
3) supporting existing NSF systemic initiatives and; 4) developing teaching tools that combine innovative technologies with NASA’s 
scientific results to enhance the educational process and embrace lifelong learning. 
 

NASA’s Education Strategic Plan contains four goals which guide the activities of the NASA Education program: 
 

•  Maintain that segment of NASA’s current education program that is judged to be effective, as determined by internal and 
   external customer measures of success; 
 

•  Implement new education reform initiatives that specifically address NASA mission requirements, national education reform, 
   and National Science and Technology Council/Committee on Education and Technology priorities; 
 

•  Expand significantly the impact of the NASA Education program by developing partnerships with key external 
   constituencies; 
 

•  Implement an agency-wide education program and evaluation framework, to bring organization, focus and accountability to 
   the agency’s efforts in education. 
 

NASA is actively involved in the efforts of the National Science and Technology Council/Committee on Education and Training 
(NSTC/CET).  This Committee includes 18 federal agencies, and is charged to work as a team in meeting the goal of ensuring U.S. 
world leadership in education and building a highly trained workforce.  The NSTC/CET has identified strategies to meet this goal 
that delineate goals and research priorities to guide the work of agencies in research and development in education.  NASA’s 
program supports the strategy outlined by the NSTC/CET. 
 



BASIS OF FY 1996 FUNDING REQUIREMENT 
 

                                       STUDENT PROGRAMS 

 
                                      FY 1994            FY 1995            FY 1996 
                                                   (Thousands of Dollars) 
 

Elementary and secondary                3,100              3,700              3,600 
Higher education                        7,600              7,500              7,600 
 

	Total                          10,700             11,200             11,200 
 

PROGRAM GOALS 
 

The goals of the Student Programs are:  to provide experiences and exposure to NASA’s mission;  to provide research experiences for 
students at NASA and related sites; and to provide support to train students in sciences, mathematics, engineering and technology. 
 

STRATEGY FOR ACHIEVING GOALS 
 

Elementary and Secondary 

 
At the Elementary and Secondary level, student support activities: provide experiences and information that encourages student 
interest in mathematics, science, engineering and technology; and  provide exposure to research and/or research experiences to 
promote mathematics, science, engineering and technology awareness.  At the elementary and secondary level, activities such as the 
Space Science Student Involvement Program (SSIP), the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX), and science and engineering 
fairs provide general exposure to NASA’s mission, stimulate interest in aeronautics, space and Earth sciences, and encourage 
students to become interested in and pursue coursework in mathematics, science, and technology subject matter.  Additional 
activities such as the Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP), and SHARP-PLUS, demonstrate the 
applications of mathematics, science and technology by providing research experiences for minority students who traditionally have 
not been represented in mathematics, science and engineering fields.     
 

Higher Education  
 

At the higher education level, student support activities: provide exposure to and involvement in research activities; provide 
experiences that facilitate the transition from undergraduate work to graduate studies in NASA related interest areas; provide 
financial support for students to pursue studies in NASA-related fields; and encourage continuing professional development and 
contributions to research in NASA related disciplines.  At the higher education level, activities such as the Graduate Student 
Researchers Program (GSRP) provides support to train students in NASA related disciplines at both the master’s and doctoral levels.  
 

An objective at all levels is to increase the participation of underrepresented groups (such as African Americans, Hispanics, Native 
Americans, Pacific Islanders, women, and individuals with disabilities).  All student support activities have these as a core set of 
objectives.  
 

MEASURES OF PERFORMANCE 
 

Elementary and Secondary              FY 1994            FY 1995            FY 1996 
                                       Actual            Estimate           Estimate 
 

Space Science Student Involvement Program (SSIP) 
        Student participants:          75,000            100,000            125,000 
        Entries/proposals:              4,200              7,000              9,000 
        Teacher participants:             600              1,000              1,200 
        Awards:                            13                 13                 13 
 

SHARP/SHARP-PLUS 
        Student participants:             400                500                500 
        Participating field centers:        8                  8                  8 
        University sites:                  10                 15                 15 
 

SAREX 
        Student participants:           9,400             10,000             10,000 
 

Higher Education 
 

GSRP 
        Student participants:             498                510                510 
        Universities:                     114                117                117 
 

Currently, program activities in the above categories have a variety of evaluation mechanisms.  In FY 1995, a high priority activity 
will be to further develop key indicators as standards by which all program activities will be measured.  These could include such 
outcomes as change in student interest, career aspirations/awareness, educational aspirations; participation in research activities; 
persistence to undergraduate or graduate degree; career path; career productivity; participation in other NASA programs; and 
increased participation of underrepresented groups. 
 
 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PLANS 
 

Elementary and Secondary 
 

The student support programs, implemented to provide experiences and exposure to NASA’s mission are: SHARP, SHARP-PLUS, 
SSIP and SAREX at the Elementary and Secondary level, and GSRP at the Higher Education level.  These are a series of programs 
that capture interest in mathematics, science and technology, and channel that interest into mathematics, science and technology 
career paths.  In FY 1994, the SHARP and SHARP-PLUS program encouraged more than 400 underrepresented minority high school 
students to participate in intensive research apprenticeships with NASA and active industry and university scientists and engineers.  
By the time this program is fully implemented in FY 1996, the program will involve 550 students. 
 

The Space Science Student Involvement Program (SSIP) is another very effective program that encourages  students to work toward 
scientific literacy through the motivating topic of space.  In FY 1994, more than 240,000 materials were distributed to elementary 
and secondary schools, providing opportunities for 600 teachers and 75,000 students to participate and enter contests to 
demonstrate the students’ skills in science as well as art, graphics, and writing.  By FY 1996, the program will include fourteen 
competition activities, encompassing all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia through eight geographical regions.  
Program participation will expand from 100,000 students to 300,000. 
 

The Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX) involves amateur radio clubs at elementary, junior high and high schools in shuttle 
missions by providing the opportunity for students to talk to astronaut operators via amateur radio.  During FY 1994, more than 
9,000 students were involved and the program is expected to include approximately the same number of students in FY 1995 and 
FY 1996. 
 

Higher Education 
 

At the Higher Education level, the GSRP, initiated in 1980, provides graduate fellowships nationwide to post-baccalaureate U.S. 
citizens to conduct thesis research.  Awards are made to a graduate student for a maximum of three years.  On an annual basis, 
NASA supports approximately 500 graduate students pursuing the masters or doctorate degrees in science, engineering, 
mathematics, and technology.  The request in FY 1995 and FY 1996 for Higher Education will maintain the fellowships at the 
current level.  This program continues to be a very competitive program, with a 6 to 1 ratio of applications to awards.  



BASIS OF FY 1996 FUNDING REQUIREMENT 
 

                                    TEACHER/FACULTY PROGRAMS 
 

                                      FY 1994            FY 1995            FY 1996 
                                                  (Thousands of Dollars) 
 

Elementary and secondary                2,200              4,600              5,700 
Higher education                        9,800              9,700              9,800 
 

        Total                          12,000             14,300             15,500 
 

PROGRAM GOALS 
 

The goal of the Teacher/Faculty program is to enhance teacher/faculty knowledge and skills, using the NASA mission, facilities, and 
resources, with the intent of producing positive student outcomes.   
 

STRATEGY FOR ACHIEVING GOALS 
 

Elementary and Secondary 
 

At the Elementary and Secondary level, preparation and enhancement activities utilize the NASA mission and the process by which 
new knowledge is discovered to: provide workshops that demonstrate the application of mathematics, science and technology in 
student learning; enhance teachers' capability to design lessons and experiences that use scientific inquiry to affect student 
learning; encourage a "multiplier" effect to extend the benefits of the in-service program beyond participants to other teachers and 
students; provide access to and promote utilization of NASA related materials and information resources; and encourage 
collaboration between Facilities of Education, Science and Engineering, to develop innovative approaches to teacher preparation for 
student learning.  At the Elementary and Secondary level, programs such as NASA Education Workshops for Elementary School 
Teachers (NEWEST), NASA Education Workshops for Math and Science Teachers (NEWMAST), Teaching from Space, and Urban 
Community Enrichment Program (UCEP) are designed to enhance and improve the teaching of mathematics, science, and 
technology by demonstrating their applications in aeronautics and space.  
 

Higher Education 
 

At the higher education level, Teacher/Faculty Program activities:  enhance faculty research skills; enhance faculty content 
knowledge, especially in aeronautics, sciences, engineering, and technology; balance participation so that a cross-section of colleges 
and universities is represented (i.e. community colleges, four year institutions, institutions that serve significant numbers of 
underrepresented groups, underfunded institutions); and provide opportunities for curriculum expansion/revisions that align with 
the mission needs of NASA and universities.  At the higher education level, activities such as the Summer Faculty Fellowship 
Program (SFFP) and the NASA/University Joint Venture (JOVE) Program provide research experiences for faculty at NASA field 
centers to further their professional knowledge in the engineering and science disciplines, and to ultimately enhance the 
undergraduate/graduate curriculum.   
 

An objective at all levels is to increase the participation of underrepresented groups (such as African Americans, Hispanics, Native 
Americans, Pacific Islanders, women, and individuals with disabilities).   
 

MEASURES OF PERFORMANCE 
 

Elementary and Secondary              FY 1994            FY 1995            FY 1996 
                                      Actual             Estimate           Estimate 
 

NEWEST/NEWMAST 
        In service workshops:               9                  9                 11 
        Teachers:                         215                215                265 
UCEP 
        Teachers:                         700                750                750 
        Students:                      17,500             18,700             18,700 
        Schools:                           70                 80                 80 
 

Teacher Enhancement Workshops 
        Teachers:                         190                300                500 
 

Higher Education 
 

        Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 
        Fellowships:                      290                290                290 
        Colleges/universities:            185                185                185 
 



                                      FY 1994            FY 1995            FY 1996 
                                      Actual             Estimate           Estimate 
 

        JOVE 
        Faculty members:                  178                178                178 
        New courses:                       32                 35                 35 
        New majors and minors:              2                  3                  3 
        Papers presented (faculty):       134                140                140 
        Papers presented NCUR (students):  22                 25                 25 
 

Innovative Research 
        Research grants:                   21                 22                 22 
 

Currently, program activities in the above categories have a variety of evaluation mechanisms.  In FY 1995, a high priority activity 
will be to further develop key indicators as standards by which all program activities will be measured.  These could include such 
outcomes as change in student interest, career aspirations/awareness, educational aspirations; participation in research activities; 
persistence to undergraduate or graduate degree; career path; career productivity; participation in other NASA programs; and 
increased participation of underrepresented groups. 
 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PLANS 
 

Elementary and Secondary 
 

By targeting educators as part of NASA’s education strategy, programs such as NEWEST and NEWMAST, Teacher Enhancement 
Workshops, Teaching from Space, and UCEP, play a significant role in ensuring that students and educators alike are provided 
today with the tools they will need tomorrow.  The FY 1996 funding will allow for expansion of NASA sponsored teacher workshops 
(NEWEST and NEWMAST) and increased participation in a National Science and Technology Council/Committee on Education and 
Training (NSTC/CET) program for long-term teacher enhancement activities.  In FY 1993, NASA participated in a NSTC/CET pilot 
program for long-term teacher enhancement where teachers were given a month of in-service and work related opportunities at the 
Marshall Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.  The cost is approximately $5,000 per teacher.  In FY 1994, the 
pilot program was expanded to include opportunities at 8 of 9 NASA Field Centers and will have 180 teachers funded in  
FY 1995. 
 

Higher Education 
 

The SFFP provides highly beneficial opportunities for U.S. citizen engineering and science faculty throughout the nation to 
participate in NASA research.  This program has contributed significantly to the improvement of both undergraduate and graduate 
education, and directly benefits NASA, universities, faculty, students and the Nation.  Approximately 300 university faculty are 
supported annually for ten weeks.  Evaluations of the program, conducted by the American Society for Engineering Education 
(ASEE), indicate that approximately 30-40% of the participating faculty subsequently receive NASA research grants or contracts.  
Program emphasis in FY 1995 will be curriculum development and to broaden the base of participating institutions. 
 

The JOint VEnture (JOVE) and Innovative Research programs also provide opportunities for college and university faculty to come to 
the NASA Centers to work with NASA data and to enhance research and teaching capabilities.  JOVE is managed by the Marshall 
Space Flight Center, where it was initiated as a pilot program in FY 1989.  NASA provides scientific on-line data from space 
missions, as well as support for electronic work stations and partial faculty and student support.  In turn, the universities agree to 
grant faculty release time, student support, and an instructional unit on a space science topic.  There are currently 75 academic 
institutions in 44 states and Puerto Rico participating.  This program allows NASA to provide data to a broader range of academic 
institutions. 
 

The Innovative Research program is managed through the Offices of Space Science and Mission to Planet Earth, to support research 
which has the potential for significant advances for Planetary and Earth Science and Astrophysics.  This program is intended to 
provide a mechanism for the funding of scientifically sound proposals which might not be funded through normal channels either 
because of their interdisciplinary nature or because they are speculative or risky.  The long-term goal is to help the new ideas 
mature to a state of acceptability within a particular science discipline. 
 

The FY 1995 and FY 1996 funding for Higher Education will provide for continuation of ongoing projects and a limited number of 
new awards. 
 

 


BASIS OF FY 1996 FUNDING REQUIREMENT 

 
                                                SYSTEMIC CHANGE 
 

                                                     FY 1994            FY 1995            FY 1996 
                                                                 (Thousands of Dollars) 
 


Aerospace education services program (AESP)            6,300              6,200              6,300 
Space grant college and fellowship program (SGCFP)    14,500             14,600             14,600 
Experimental program to stimulate competitive 
        research (EPSCoR)                              5,000              4,900              5,900 
Innovative reform initiatives                            700                700              2,700 
 

        Total                                         26,500             26,400             29,500 
 

PROGRAM GOALS 
 

The goal of the Systemic Change program is to enhance capabilities of the educational community through individual/ collaborative 
efforts with a range of partners and/or through infrastructure changes. 
 

STRATEGY FOR ACHIEVING GOALS 


Elementary and Secondary 
 

Systemic Change activities at the Elementary and Secondary level use NASA personnel and resources to contribute to K-12 
mathematics, science, and technology education reform by promoting the involvement of various community sectors; and enhance 
the participation of schools and organizations serving a significant number of underrepresented groups.  A major outreach program 
at the elementary and secondary education level is the Aerospace Education Services Program (AESP), also known as Spacemobile. 
The AESP specialists, all former science, mathematics, or technology teachers, capture the interest of millions of students and 
enhance the teaching skills of teachers each year by using aeronautics and space as a catalyst in the teaching of science, 
mathematics, and technology.  The AESP specialists visit schools throughout the U.S. conducting  teacher workshops and student 
programs.  The AESP specialists also conduct teacher workshops at the NASA Centers and various colleges and universities.  
 

Higher Education  
 

Systemic Change activities at the higher education level enhance the research and educational capabilities of the higher education 
community through activities conducted through partnerships, linkages, and collaborations; and enhance the collaborative 
capabilities of a diverse set of academic institutions serving a significant number of underrepresented groups.  Programs such as the 
Space Grant College and Fellowship Program (SGCFP), Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (ESPCoR), and 
Innovative Reform Initiatives play a major role in NASA's contribution toward the Nation's systemic educational reform movement.   
 

The SGCFP is composed of three interrelated elements:  Designated Space Grant Colleges/Consortia, Space Grant Program 
Consortia, and Space Grant Capability Enhancement Consortia.  All consortia contain academic, industry, and governmental 
affiliates.  The 21 Designated Space Grant Consortia were selected in FY 1989 and are led by preeminent institutions which are 
substantially involved in a broad spectrum of NASA research, offer advanced study in aerospace fields, and are significantly involved 
in related public service.  In FY 1992, FY 1993, and FY 1994, designated schools received grants ranging from $295,000-$380,000. 
 

In FY 1991, a second competition took place to select states for Program Grants or for Capability Enhancement Grants (the 
difference between the two types of programs is related to current involvement in aerospace fields).  Twenty-nine proposals were 
received.  Of those 29, fourteen were funded as Program Grants, twelve as Capability Enhancement Grants and three as planning 
grants.  Selections were announced in February 1991.  Program Grant and Capability Grant awardees received $150,000 in  
FY 1991, a portion of which was to be used for fellowships.  In FY 1992, FY 1993, and FY 1994, the states received an additional 
augmentation of $20,000, with the opportunity to receive an additional $35,000, depending upon the size of the consortium.  The 
three states which received planning grants of $25,000 each, were brought into the program as fully-funded Capability 
Enhancement grantees, along with Vermont and Puerto Rico, in FY 1992.   
 

Institutions of higher education involved in the Space Grant program currently number over 400.  All consortia match their program 
grants at 100% in either dollars and/or cost sharing arrangements to carry out programs of education, public service, and research. 
 

In addition to the very successful SGCFP, the FY 1993 NASA Authorization Act (P.L. 102-588) directed NASA to initiate a program to 
strengthen the research capability of states that do not successfully participate in competitive space and aeronautical research 
activities.  This program, modeled after the National Science Foundation's EPSCoR, provides seed funding that will enable eligible 
states to develop an academic research enterprise directed toward long-term, self-sustaining, nationally competitive capability in 
space science and applications, aeronautical research and technology, and space research and technology programs.  This capability 
will, in turn, contribute to the state's economic viability. 
 

Systemic change at both elementary and higher education levels is captured in NASA's Innovative Reform Initiatives program which 
is supportive of standard-based systemic reform efforts and NSTC/CET priorities, and focuses on science, mathematics and 
technology education.  A means of accomplishing systemic reform is through partnerships with professional education associations, 
national aerospace education associations, industries, other Federal agencies, and state and local groups.  When NASA becomes a 
partner with these groups, its role fluctuates between providing leadership, being a participant, or acting as a facilitator to empower 
and enable wide reaching educational reform that is systemic in nature.  Examples of these partnerships are:  the Tri-State 
Education Initiative (TSEI), the NASA Industry Education Initiative (NIEI) and the Aerospace Education Alliance Initiative. 
 

MEASURES OF PERFORMANCE 
 

                                      FY 1994            FY 1995            FY 1996 
                                      Actual             Estimate           Estimate 

AESP 
Elementary and secondary students:    670,012            600,000            500,000 
Elementary and secondary teachers:     17,152             21,000             22,000 
Schools visited:                        1,588              2,000              2,000 
Classrooms visited:                     2,766              3,000              3,000 
 

National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program 
Space grant consortia                      52                 52                 52 
Institutions:                             525                550                550 
Fellowships awarded:                    1,600              1,600              1,600 
Higher education programs:                283                308                333 
K-12 programs:                            400                350                325 
General public service programs:          400                350                250 
 

EPSCoR 
Awards                                      6                  6                 14 
 

Innovative Reform Initiatives 
Public schools systems:                    30                 45                 60 
Schools:                                  231                346                460 
Students:                             101,800            150,000            200,000 
Teachers:                               5,600             84,000              1,120 
 

Currently, program activities in the above categories have a variety of evaluation mechanisms.  In FY 1995, a high priority activity 
will be to further develop key indicators as standards by which all program activities will be measured.   These could include such 
outcomes as the establishment of partnerships; increased resources (people, funding, facilities, equipment); and new ways of 
conducting business. 
 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PLANS 
 

The systemic change programs address many different levels within the education community and include:  the Aerospace 
Education Services Program (AESP), Space Grant College and Fellowship Program (SGCFP), Experimental Program to Stimulate 
Competitive Research (EPSCoR), and the Innovative Reform Initiatives.  
 
 

AESP 
 

In FY 1994, the format of the AESP was redesigned; new training and program delivery strategies were implemented to include more 
teacher enhancement emphasis and support of the National Science Foundation systemic change initiatives.  Additionally, a pilot 
was established in FY 1994 to reformat the specialists role from a school consultant to a NASA state/regional level consultant.  
Funding in FY 1995 and FY 1996 will continue operation of this program. 

 
Space Grant College and Fellowship Program 
 


In FY 1994, an extensive evaluation of the 52 consortia was conducted.  Each consortia was graded on the bases of:  (1) a detailed 
self evaluation; (2) database entries on each consortia; and (3) a measure of consortia responsiveness to NASA requirements.  The 
result of this evaluation was that 39 consortia received new five-year awards and 13 consortia received one-year awards with 
detailed instructions on improvements that would be required to receive additional yearly awards.  In FY 1995 and FY 1996, Space 
Grant plans to initiate a competition for Program Grants to move to Designation status.   
 

Further substantive work in industry-Space Grant relations is planned.  Focus will be placed on the following Space Grant content 
areas: undergraduate training; community colleges; K-12 components which support national education reform, and a continued 
effort to bring more members of underrepresented groups into Space Grant management, as well as fellowship awards. 
 

EPSCoR 
 

A program announcement was issued in June 1993 advising  twenty eligible states of the opportunity to submit proposals for the 
NASA EPSCoR program.  Nineteen proposals were received, and after an extensive merit based review, involving peers from 
university and industry as well as representatives from NASA headquarters and field centers, Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, 
Louisiana, Montana, and Puerto Rico were selected to receive $500,000 annual awards for three years.   
 

FY 1995 marks the second year of the NASA EPSCoR program with funding continued for the original six awardees.  In addition, 
opportunities are being made available to the 13 non-selected states to build upon highly rated research areas from the original 
proposals.  These opportunities will be in the form of research grants or participation in existing NASA education programs, and are 
designed to enhance proposal competitiveness for the next round of EPSCoR selection.  An announcement for the next round of 
NASA EPSCoR awards will be issued in spring 1995, with selection of up to eight states scheduled for early calendar year 1996. 
 

In addition to making second round selections, FY 1996 will be the third year of funding for the original six awardees.  At the end of 
the third year, an assessment will be made based on an evaluation of the extent to which the goals stated in the program 
announcement and in the original proposal have been achieved.  Progress towards these goals will be evaluated through site visits 
by outside evaluators and by reference to indicators.  These states showing successful progress toward stated goals will qualify for 
an additional two-year award.  As the selected states are also part of the Space Grant College program, the two programs are being 
closely coordinated. 
 

Innovative Reform Initiatives 
 

The Tri-State Education Initiative is achieving systemic education reform through a consortium of 30 school districts by creating an 
interconnected, high technology learning environment in Alabama, Tennessee and Mississippi.  NASA leads the effort with 19 other 
Federal agencies and 35 national and international corporations reaching  5,600 teachers, 102,000 students and thousands of 
community members.  The Systemic Cooperative Model, developed by this initiative, is now being replicated in many areas 
throughout the nation. 
 

The NASA Industry Education Initiative is another example of the power of partnerships.  On November 15, 1994, Chief Executive 
Officers of the nation’s 28 largest aerospace contractors teamed with NASA and the U.S. Department of Education in an ambitious 
plan to achieve the nation’s mathematics, science and technology education goals. 
 

The Aerospace Education Alliance is a cooperative venture of the nation’s five leading aerospace education organizations -- the U.S. 
Space Foundation, Young Astronaut Council, Challenger Center for Space Science Education, U.S. Space Camp and Space 
Academy, and the Astronaut Memorial Foundation.  Working together, using space as a unifying and inspiring educational theme, 
the alliance will build on the success of the current programs each of the organizations offers to implement a coordinated strategy to 
support change in America’s K-8 teaching process. 

 
 
 


BASIS OF FY 1996 FUNDING REQUIREMENT 
 

                                            EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY 
	 

                                      FY 1994            FY 1995            FY 1996 

                                                   (Thousands of Dollars) 
 

Education technology                    5,100              3,900              4,200 
 

PROGRAM GOALS 
 

The goal of the Educational Technology program is to provide products and services that facilitate the application of technology to 
enhance the educational process for formal education and lifelong learning. 
 

STRATEGY FOR ACHIEVING GOALS 
 

The Education Technology program uses technology to support new models of learning and teaching for students.  The teaching and 
learning tools developed through this program combine the unique NASA mission and innovative technology and networking 
applications to stimulate student interest in math, science and technology.  Educational Technology activities produce teaching 
tools (e.g. CD-ROM databases, live or taped video, computer software, multimedia systems, virtual reality) and instructional 
materials for their most effective use.  These tools use existing technology as well as emerging technologies to facilitate education 
programs which support the achievement of national education standards.  This program also conducts research into new teaching 
and learning practices that are made possible with technology.  NASA’s strategy for educational technology has been developed in 
close alignment with the NSTC/CET Subcommittee on Research and Development in Education and Training. 
 

MEASURES OF PERFORMANCE 
 

Astronomy Village                 Development of interactive multimedia program to supplement high school science 
May 1995                          curricula. 
 

Educational Multimedia showcase   Begin operation of a 21st century learning center, to develop multimedia curriculum  
Classroom of the Future	          products based on existing and emerging learning technology.  Facility includes  
May 1995	                  distance learning facility, video production equipment for education videos, teacher  
	                          resource center, Challenger learning center for learning science in an interactive  
	                          environment. 
 

BioBLAST                          Development of computer simulation curriculum package in which students manage 
FY 1996	                          missions aboard the International Space Station and a mission to Mars. 
 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PLANS 
 

During FY 1994, two major curriculum packages which utilize advanced educational technologies and which are aligned with 
emerging national curriculum strategies were developed.  The first, Interactive NOVA: Earth, is a high school course in Earth 
Systems Sciences.  The second, Astronomy Village, is an 11th grade, 10-week course in Astronomy.  Both packages incorporate 
state-of-the-art interactive strategies delivered on optical media (i.e. videodisk and CD-ROM respectively).  Additionally, both 
underwent extensive formative evaluation and field testing in preparation for distribution to schools.  These packages, as well as 
others (e.g. Liftoff to Learning), will be made widely available to schools nationwide.  In FY 1995, additional tools will be developed to 
build upon the success of Interactive NOVA and Astronomy Village. 
 



BASIS OF FY 1996 FUNDING REQUIREMENT 
 

                                           EVALUATION 
	 

                                      FY 1994            FY 1995            FY 1996 
                                                    (Thousands of Dollars) 
 

Evaluation                                 --                500              1,000 
 

PROGRAM GOALS 
 

The goal of the Evaluation program is to: (a) provide documented evidence of the degree to which NASA’s educational program, with 
its associated projects and activities, has accomplished its goals, and (2) to develop a systematic strategy for collecting, aggregating, 
and reporting evaluation indicator data. 
 

STRATEGY FOR ACHIEVING GOALS 
 

In FY 1993, NASA initiated the key element of a strategy to enhance the evaluation of its education programs by contracting with 
National Research Council (NRC) to conduct a study and recommend appropriate evaluation indicators.  The report from NRC was 
received by NASA in August 1994 and is now being implemented by convening education program managers along with experts from 
the professional evaluation community to develop data collection instruments.  Additionally, more detailed evaluation studies of 
major program are to be conducted.  These studies will conform to standards recommended by NSTC/CET and will be closely tied to 
management decisions regarding program continuation or modification. 
 

MEASURES OF PERFORMANCE 
 

In FY 1995, an evaluation indicator system, with corresponding data collection instruments and a database, will be operational 
across core NASA education programs.  Two major evaluation studies will be implemented with results expected in FY 1996. 
 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PLANS 
 


NASA has commissioned and received (in August 1994) a study by the National Academy of Sciences on evaluation indicators.  
Concomitantly, NASA has worked with the National Science Foundation to establish program evaluation standards.  These 
indicators and standards are now being implemented in all of NASA’s education programs.  NASA’s plans call for a revised database 
to collect all these data and specific instrumentation to be developed and implemented.
	

SAT 7.1