SCIENCE, AERONAUTICS AND TECHNOLOGY 

 
                                  FISCAL YEAR 1996 ESTIMATES 
 

                                       BUDGET SUMMARY 
 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS                           MINORITY UNIVERSITY RESEARCH AND EDUCATION PROGRAM 
   

                              SUMMARY OF RESOURCES REQUIREMENTS 
 
                                                                                                  

                                                 FY 1994            FY 1995            FY 1996	 
                                                              (Thousands of Dollars) 
 

Historically black colleges and universities      17,700             25,000             30,500   
Other minority universities                        7,000             14,400             20,000   
Graduate student researchers program 
  (Underrepresented minority and disabled focus)   3,400              3,400              3,600   
Undergraduate student researchers program 
  (Underrepresented minority and disabled focus)   3,100              3,100              3,200   
 

        Total                                     31,200             45,900             57,300 
 

Distribution of Program Amount by Installation 
 

Johnson Space Center                                 675              1,125              1,275 
Kennedy Space Center                                 125                575                725 
Marshall Space Flight Center                         837                987              1,137 
Stennis Space Center                                 134                344                494 
Ames Research Center                                  75                425                575 
Dryden Flight Research Center                         --                200                350 
Langley Research Center	                           2,266              2,416              2,566 
Lewis Research Center                                325                975              1,125 
Goddard Space Flight Center                          919              1,169              1,319 
Jet Propulsion Laboratory                          1,287              1,437              1,587 
Headquarters                                      24,557             36,247             46,147 
 

        Total                                     31,200             45,900             57,300 



                                            SCIENCE, AERONAUTICS AND TECHNOLOGY 
 

                                                FISCAL YEAR 1996 ESTIMATES 

 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS                                            MINORITY UNIVERSITY RESEARCH AND EDUCATION PROGRAM 
 

PROGRAM GOALS 
 

NASA has made a major commitment to being a leader in strengthening the research infrastructure capabilities of minority 
universities to compete for "mainstream" federal funding.  The goal of the Minority University Research and Education program is to 
strengthen the research capabilities of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU's) and Other Minority Universities 
(OMU's), primarily Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSI's) and Tribal Colleges, and to develop a stronger and more diverse resource 
pool of scientific and technical talent from which NASA and the Nation will benefit. 
 

STRATEGY FOR ACHIEVING GOALS 
 

The goal of strengthening the research capabilities of minority institutions has been one of NASA's major goals for several years.  
The Congress and Executive Branch have established a clear record of commitment to increasing the involvement of minority 
institutions in federally-sponsored programs.  One of the Administration's national education goals is to increase the number of 
women and minority students receiving graduate and undergraduate degrees in mathematics and science.  The NASA Minority 
University Research and Education program seeks to form alliances between minority institutions, majority research institutions, 
state and local governments, elementary and secondary schools, industry and other Federal Research and Development programs.   
 

The Minority University Research and Education program pursues these alliances through the aggressive implementation of 
research initiatives for the HBCU's and the OMU's (particularly the HSI's and the Tribal Colleges), and by supporting undergraduate 
and graduate student incentive programs at minority universities.  The NASA Program Offices and Installations are directly involved 
in this strategy by providing technical assistance and long-term research programs to prepare and guide the transition of minority 
institutions, faculty and students into NASA's research and education competitive peer review processes.  Ultimately, it is 
anticipated that these institutions, faculty and students will be prepared to compete successfully in NASA's mainstream research 
and employment processes.  There is close collaboration with the NASA Education Programs to ensure that minority institutions 
and their elementary and secondary school partners, especially those with predominant enrollments of underrepresented minority 
students, are aware of and involved in the Agency's K-12 mathematics, science, and technology educational efforts. 
 

NASA's outreach to minority institutions is accomplished primarily through research and training grants which focus on specific 
research disciplines relevant to NASA requirements in science and technology.  These grants are used to support faculty and 
students at HBCU's and OMU's, thereby increasing the scientific and technological contributions from these institutions, and 
increasing the pool of underrepresented minorities in NASA-related science and engineering disciplines.  The four primary categories 
of awards and their goals are: 


  Minority Research Centers - to develop broad-based research in areas related to NASA's strategic enterprises.  Support for 
   the Research Centers is provided by the NASA program offices. 
 

  Institutional Research Awards - to strengthen the research infrastructure of minority universities and to provide focus on 
   NASA disciplines through a quality learning and research environment for underrepresented minority students and faculty 
   members. 
 

  Principal Investigator Awards - to increase diversity in the NASA-sponsored research community by providing "start-up" 
   funds for underrepresented minority investigators at minority institutions. 
 

  Math and Science Awards - to contribute to the Nation's mathematics, science, and technology goals by supporting and 
   participating in partnerships led by minority institutions and involving state and local elementary and secondary schools, 
   corporations, and community-based organizations that support and further the mathematics, science, and technology 
   education of underrepresented minorities and individuals with disabilities.  
 

The NASA Institutional Program Offices and other technically oriented program offices contribute to the success of the Minority 
University Research and Education program by selecting, funding and conducting research activities with minority universities.  In 
FY 1994, the NASA Program Offices funded $17.7 million of research activities at minority colleges and universities.  This funding 
level is expected to increase to $20.8 million in FY 1995 and to $24.3 million in FY 1996. 
 

To encourage the development of talent at the undergraduate and graduate level, a special focus on Underrepresented Minority and 
Disabled Students was established within the NASA Graduate and Undergraduate Student Researchers program.  This program 
identifies capable students at the undergraduate and graduate level pursuing degrees in science or engineering.  These students 
receive tuition support, mentoring support and opportunities to spend their summers conducting research with principal 
investigators at their universities, NASA Installations, Federal laboratories or private industry. 
 



BASIS OF FY 1996 BUDGET REQUIREMENT 
 

                                                 FY 1994            FY 1995            FY 1996 
                                                             (Thousands of Dollars) 
 

Historically black colleges and universities      17,700             25,000             30,500 
 

PROGRAM GOALS 
 

The goal of NASA's Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) program is to strengthen the capacity of HBCU's to provide 
quality education; and to increase opportunities for HBCU's, their faculty and students to participate in and benefit from NASA's 
research and education programs. 

 
STRATEGY FOR ACHIEVING GOALS 

 
The HBCU's were involved in NASA's mission before man set foot on the Moon in 1969.  In 1980, President Jimmy Carter signed 
Executive Order 12232 which established a Federal program "...to strengthen and expand the capacity of HBCUs to provide quality 
education."  Executive Orders issued by Presidents Ronald Reagan and George Bush strengthened this program.  NASA's current 
initiatives for the HBCU's are based upon two recent Executive Orders.  Executive Order 12876, signed November 1, 1993, 
mandates that agencies "...advance the development of human potential, to strengthen the capacity of HBCU's to participate in and 
benefit from federal programs...to achieve an increase in the participation by HBCU's in federal programs."  Executive Order 12928, 
signed September 16, 1994, directs Federal agencies to promote procurement with "...Historically Black Colleges and Minority 
Institutions."  NASA employs a comprehensive strategy to accomplish the HBCU program goals.  This approach is carried out 
through awards in four areas:  

 
  1.  Research Center Awards 
 

  2.  Institutional Research Awards 
 

  3.  Individual Principal Investigator Awards 
 

  4.  Mathematics and Science Awards 
 

The NASA HBCU Research Center Awards program was established in FY 1991 by the Office of Space Science and Applications; the 
Office of Aeronautics, the Office of Space Flight; and the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs.  The goal of the HBCU Research 
Center program is to develop broad-based competitive research capability in areas related to space science and applications, 
advanced space technology, and advanced aeronautics technology, while expanding the Nation's base for aerospace research and 
development, and increasing the participation of the HBCU faculty and students in the Agency's research.  Seven Research Centers 
were selected to receive 5-year research grant awards.   These selections were based on the technical quality and understanding of 
the proposed core research and its relevance to NASA; the strength and quality of the HBCU's existing undergraduate and graduate 
research programs; management and staffing of the research center; the university's commitment to the institutional long-term 
strategic commitment in the core research area; and university, government agency and industry partnerships.   

 
The following institutions were selected as HBCU Research Centers: 
 

        University                      Research Focus 
 

	Tuskegee University             Center for Food Production, Processing and Waste Management for Controlled Ecological Life 	
		                        Support Systems (CELSS) 
 

        Howard University               Center for the Study of Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Atmospheres 
 

        Florida A&M University          Center for Nonlinear and Nonequilibrium Aeroscience 
 

        Clark Atlanta University        High Performance Polymers and Ceramics (HiPPAC) Center  
 

        North Carolina A&T              Center for Aerospace Research 
        State University	 

 
        Fisk University                 Center for Photonic Materials and Devices 
 

        Hampton University              Center for Optical Physics 
 

NASA's Institutional Research Awards (IRA) program is being expanded to include outreach to the HBCU's during FY 1995.  The IRA 
program targets the HBCU's which do not receive significant NASA research funding and which offer graduate degree programs in 
engineering or science.  The objectives of the IRA program are:  to strengthen and improve core research areas of significance to the 
NASA mission; increase the number of underrepresented minorities who are U.S. citizens conducting space research and working in 
NASA-related disciplines; and, strengthen the research environment of eligible institutions and the capability of individuals by 
supporting the institutional infrastructure through the acquisition of research equipment; faculty research; underrepresented 
minority U.S. citizens who are undergraduate and graduate student researchers; and technology transfer to market place and 
minority communities.  This year's IRA solicitation will call for research proposals that achieve routine full Internet usage at HBCU's 
conducting NASA-related research and education.   
 

Principal Investigator Awards identify outstanding and promising engineering, physical and life science tenure-track 
underrepresented minority and disabled faculty early in their academic careers, who are capable of contributing to the Agency's 
research objectives, and who have limited past NASA research grant experience.  The Principal Investigator awards provide faculty 
members with sufficient research support and exposure to the NASA peer review process to enable them to demonstrate creativity, 
productivity, and future promise in the transition toward achieving competitive awards in the Agency's mainstream research 
processes.   
 

The HBCU Mathematics and Science Awards program focuses on strengthening the capacity of the HBCU's to provide excellence in 
mathematics, science, engineering, and technology (MSET) training while increasing the participation and achievement of 
underrepresented minorities and persons with disabilities in the MSET fields at all levels of education. 
 

NASA has established Technical Review Committees to provide technical guidance and on-site reviews to the IRA and the Research 
Center award recipients in order to help them achieve their goals.  NASA promotes collaboration between its HBCU-funded 
programs, the Installations and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); and with entities outside of NASA.  Institutions are encouraged 
to seek funding through NASA's traditional opportunities, as well as other government agencies and private sources.  This is done in 
an effort to promote future sustainability.  Research Centers, IRA's and Principal Investigator (PI's) awards require substantial 
undergraduate and graduate student involvement in research projects.  The mathematics and science awards are normally managed 
by personnel at the NASA Installations and the JPL. 

 
NASA Headquarters Program Offices, NASA Installations and the JPL support the HBCU program through direct funding, use of 
their facilities, and commitment of their personnel to serve on Technical Review Committees, and assist in other facets of program 
implementation.  Numerous students and PI's from the HBCU's spend time on-site at the Installations and the JPL throughout the 
year. 

 
MEASURES OF PERFORMANCE 
 

Progress towards achieving the HBCU program goals is monitored through assessing the research involvement and productivity of 
faculty and students in NASA programs at HBCUs.  In FY 1994, 124 faculty-level investigators were involved in NASA-related 
research work at the seven HBCU Research Centers, and 103 faculty researchers were involved in individual principal investigator 
research projects at HBCUs.  During this same period, the HBCU Research Centers involved in their research work 96 graduate and 
135 undergraduate U.S. citizen, underrepresented minority students, produced 140 refereed papers or book chapters, and gave 166 
presentations at research conferences or seminars.  Building on their FY 1992-FY 1993 NASA funding, the HBCU Research Centers 
secured $16.7 million in 1994 research funding from other sources, as compared to the $10.6 million invested by NASA in FY 1994.  
Service on NASA peer review and advisory panels is a key indicator of integration into the mainstream of NASA research.  In FY 
1994, four incidences of such service were reported by the HBCU Research Centers.  Greater involvement will be sought in FY 1995. 

 
Similar data for individual principal investigator awards is being compiled, but is not yet available.  In FY 1995, the productivity 
represented by these indicators is expected to increase as the existing HBCU Research Centers reach maturity, and new HBCU 
Research Centers and Institutional Research Awards are established. 
 

 
 
Pre-college students are involved mainly through faculty, student and teacher preparation programs carried out by the HBCUs.  In  
FY 1994, NASA outreach programs at seven HBCUs involved 2,264 underrepresented minority students in mathematics, science, 
engineering, and technology enhancement activities.  In FY 1995, these numbers are expected to increase significantly as the 
Mathematics, Science and Technology Preparation and Curriculum Enhancement Awards (MASTAP) and Pre-College Awards for 
Excellence in Mathematics, Science, Engineering and Technology (PACE/MSET) projects are initiated at HBCUs.   
 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PLANS 
 

In FY 1994, NASA provided support to 37 out of the 106 existing HBCUs.  This funding included a total of 29 research projects and 
20 training projects, with 12 of the HBCUs having both training and research projects. 
 

NASA provided the third year of funding for seven HBCU Research Centers during FY 1994.  As a result of satisfactory technical 
progress as determined by on-site reviews of all the HBCU Research Centers, and recommendations from the NASA Technical 
Review Committees to continue funding in FY 1995, these seven Research Centers will be sustained for a fourth year.  During the 
fourth year of the 5-year award, a comprehensive technical review by technical peer reviewers external to NASA will be made of each 
Research Center.  The results of the external review will be used by NASA to finalize the continuation process for the above Research 
Centers before the last year of their 5-year grant award.  Additionally, in FY 1995, two new Research Centers will be selected as a 
result of a competitive peer review process conducted by internal NASA and external technical reviewers.  All nine Research Centers 
will be sustained in FY 1996. 
 

During FY 1995, the IRA program will be expanded to include the participation of the HBCU's.  The focus of the FY 1995 awards will 
be on establishing three HBCU Network Resources and Training Sites (NRTS).  These sites will be responsible for stimulating the use 
of the Internet as an integral part of minority institutions' interdisciplinary research and education capabilities.  Additionally, the 
HBCU NRTS's will be required to assess the specific needs of institutions in their region, to provide network connectivity for the 
institutions in their region, and to provide a user resource center and network training for the HBCU faculty and students in their 
region.  During FY 1996, these three IRA's will be sustained, and three new IRA awards will be competitively selected. 

 
The awards to individual PI's at the HBCU's were slightly increased between FY 1994 and FY 1995 to a total of 117 awards.  During 
FY 1996, the total awards to the PI's will increase to 138, with an average of $75,000 per award.  Consistent with the Administration's 
FY 1996 research and development priorities, all research funded under the minority university program will continue to be primarily 
awarded through merit review with peer evaluation processes.  For individual PI awards, an annual research announcement of 
opportunity, the Faculty Awards for Research (FAR) has been developed.  Peer review is conducted by NASA Installations and the JPL 
technical personnel.  Following the merit review, selections are made by NASA Headquarters Program Offices and the FAR recipients 
are awarded 3-year research grants.  During FY 1995, six second-year HBCU FAR awards will be continued, and up to 10 new FAR 
recipients will be selected.  Funding in FY 1996 will continue support to award recipients. 
 

In support of the national mathematics and science education goals, NASA funds educational programs to support the preparation, 
persistence and participation of underrepresented minorities and individuals with disabilities in Agency-related disciplines.  Two 
competitive peer review processes have been established to identify and select the most productive projects in this area.  These 
processes involve two different initiatives:  the MASTAP and the PACE/MSET. 

 
The MASTAP was initiated under NASA's Other Minority University program in FY 1994.  The primary objective of MASTAP is to 
support institutions of higher education to increase the number and quality of underrepresented minority teachers well-prepared in 
science and mathematics.   MASTAP is designed to increase the number and strengthen the technical skills and knowledge of 
underrepresented minority mathematics, science and technology pre-service teachers at the HBCU's who become state-certified to 
teach in middle and high schools that have substantial enrollments of underrepresented minorities; and to improve mathematics 
and science literacy among underrepresented minority pre-service and in-service teachers and middle and high school students.  In 
FY 1995, the HBCU's will be able to submit proposals for the first time in response to NASA's program notice.  Through the 
competitive peer review selection process, three institutions will be selected for awards in FY 1995.  In FY 1996, NASA will sustain 
these three awards and competitively select three additional awards.   

 
The PACE/MSET program will be initiated in FY 1995.  The purpose of the program is to contribute to the national education goals 
by supporting research-based educational outreach projects that increase the number and strengthen the skills, knowledge and 
interest of underrepresented minority and disabled students in college preparatory mathematics, science and technology courses in 
public middle and high schools with substantial enrollments of minorities.  During FY 1995,  NASA will competitively select four 
awards at the HBCU's and continue to fund other ongoing efforts for a total of 33 pre-college projects.  In FY 1996, NASA will use 
the PACE/MSET competitive review process to increase the number of projects at the HBCU's to 43. 
 

In FY 1994, the NASA Program Offices contributed $11.3 million in support of research activities conducted primarily at the HBCU 
Research Centers.  This funding is expected to increase to $12.8 million in FY 1995, and to $14.2 million in FY 1996. 



BASIS OF FY 1996 BUDGET REQUIREMENT 
 

                                      FY 1994            FY 1995            FY 1996 
                                                   (Thousands of Dollars) 
 

Other minority universities             7,000             14,400             20,000 
 

PROGRAM GOALS 
 

The goal of NASA's Other Minority Universities (OMU) program is to increase the opportunities for Hispanics, Native Americans, 
Pacific Islanders, and people with disabilities to participate in and benefit from NASA's research and education programs. 
 

STRATEGY FOR ACHIEVING GOALS 
 

In the House and Senate Reports accompanying the FY 1985 VA-HUD-Independent Agencies Appropriations Act (P.L. 98-371), 
Congress established building relationships between NASA and minority institutions of higher education as a priority.  Language 
included in both reports (House Report 98-803 and Senate Report 98-506) directed NASA to "...review institutions of higher learning 
having significant minority enrollments to find ways to build closer relations with such schools, meet NASA's research objectives 
and increase the number of individuals from underrepresented groups in the pool of graduate researchers...to build a closer 
relationship with institutions serving significant numbers of minorities...".  To provide greater emphasis on this congressional 
mandate NASA established the OMU program in August 1991.  Since that time, Presidential Executive Orders and congressional 
reports have provided specific direction to the Agency to strengthen its research and education programs with other minority 
universities.  Most recently, Executive Order 12900 (February 22, 1994) mandates that agencies increase Hispanic American 
participation in Federal education programs where Hispanic Americans currently are underserved, and Executive Order 12928 
(September 16, 1994) directs Federal agencies to promote procurement with "...Historically Black Colleges and Minority 
Institutions."  Congress has directed funding increases in FY 1994 and FY 1995 for the Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs).  
Additionally, congressional direction was provided to NASA in the Conference report accompanying the FY 1995 VA-HUD-
Independent Agencies Appropriations Act (P.L. 103-327) to establish NASA research centers at the HSI's.   
 

NASA originally responded to the early Congressional and Executive Branch direction by formulating a five-year plan for the OMU 
program in FY 1991 to strengthen the Agency's research initiatives at other minority universities.  This plan consists of three 
phases:  (1) individual principal investigator research awards, (2) institutional research awards and (3) teacher training and student 
programs focusing on NASA-related disciplines, and addressed all institutions with significant minority populations other than the 
Historically Black Colleges and Unversities (HBCUs).  The OMU plan was expanded in FY 1993, when the NASA Administrator 
signed a plan to strengthen the Agency's relationships with HSI's.  The direction received from the Congress and Executive Branch 
is reflected in the current program plan for the OMU.  
 

NASA strategies for achieving the goals of the OMU program reflect those established in the HBCU program.  However, because of 
the differences in the evolution of minority institutions and the particularities of Federal mandates for the HBCU's and Hispanic 
Americans, NASA's approach and implementation plan have been adjusted to take these factors into consideration.  For example, 
the Federal mandate for Hispanic Americans directs Federal agencies to "...improve educational outcomes for Hispanic Americans 
participating in Federal education programs...".  As a result, the Agency has placed greater emphasis on mathematics and science 
awards than on institutional research awards.  The strategies for achieving goals under NASA's OMU program are identified below in 
priority order:  

 
  1.  Mathematics and Science Awards 
 

  2.  Individual Principal Investigator Awards 
 

  3.  Institutional Research Awards; and 
 

  4.  Research Center Awards 
 

Competitive peer review processes have been established for each of the above areas.  In 1991, unsolicited proposals were the 
primary mechanism used to fund mathematics and science awards.  In 1994, the first minority university program, Mathematics, 
Science and Technology Teacher Preparation and Curriculum Enhancement Awards (MASTAP), competitive announcement of 
opportunity was issued for response by the OMU's.  The Individual Principal Investigator (PI) awards program was established in 
1992, under the Faculty Awards for Research Announcement of Opportunity.  This was also the first competitive announcement of 
opportunity issued specifically to identify and attract faculty at the OMU's to NASA research.  To enhance and build research 
capability in a core research area, NASA issued the first announcement of opportunity for the IRA's to the OMU's in 1994.  The final 
strategy in NASA's plan to strengthen the research capability at the OMU's will be implemented in 1995, when the Agency selects 
four OMU Research Center Awards.  This selection will be made through a competitive process.  

 
MEASURES OF PERFORMANCE 
 

In FY 1994, 44 faculty-level investigators were involved in NASA-related research work with the six IRAs, and 105 faculty 
researchers were involved in individual principal investigator research projects at the OMU's.  During this same period, the IRA 
institutions involved 19 graduate and 29 undergraduate U.S. citizens, underrepresented minority students in these research 
activities.  
 

Information on publications and leveraged funding for the IRAs is not yet available as they have yet to complete their first year of 
work.  Data for individual principal investigator awards is being compiled, but is not yet available.  In FY 1995, the productivity 
represented by these indicators is expected to substantially increase as the first IRAs move into their second year of funding, and 
new IRAs and the OMU Research Centers are established.  Involvement in NASA conventional "mainstream" research processes is a 
key indicator of integration into the mainstream of NASA awards for recipients of IRA and principal investigator awards.  Data on 
the level of involvement will be complied during FY 1995. 


Pre-college students are involved mainly through faculty, student and teacher preparation programs carried out at OMUs.  In  
FY 1994, NASA outreach programs at nine OMUs involved 4,225 underrepresented minority students in mathematics, science, 
engineering, and technology enhancement activities.  In FY 1995, these numbers are expected to increase significantly as the first 
year of MASTAP projects are completed, and additional Mathematics, Science and Technology Teacher Preparation and Curriculum 
Enhancement Awards (MASTAP) and the Pre-college Awards for Excellence in Mathematics, Science, Engineering and Technology 
(PACE/MSET) projects are initiated. 
 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PLANS 
 

In FY 1995, NASA will initiate a Research Center Program for the OMU's; four institutions will be competitively selected to receive 
awards.  NASA will sustain these four Research Centers for a second year in FY 1996.   
 

During FY 1994, six HSI's successfully competed to receive an IRA.  These institutions are: 
 

        California State University at Los Angeles; 
        City College of New York; 
        Florida International University; 
        New Mexico Highlands University; 
        University of Puerto Rico - Rio Piedras; 
        University of Texas at San Antonio. 
 

In FY 1995, NASA will sustain these six awards and competitively select three additional OMU's for awards.  The focus of the  
FY 1995 awards will be the design of an Internet network among the OMU's and other minority institutions for conducting network 
training and NASA-related research work.  In FY 1996, NASA will sustain six third year and three second year IRA's to the HSIs and 
competitively select three additional OMU's for awards.   
 

During FY 1994 PI awards, through the Faculty Awards for Research (FAR), at the OMU's totaled 40.  In FY 1995, that number will 
be increased slightly to 52 awards.  In  FY 1996, total PI awards will increase to 88, with an average of $75,000 per award.  Growth 
is projected based on outreach to the PIs at the OMU's.  The primary funding mechanism will be the FAR competitive peer review 
process. 

 
To promote faculty and student development and teacher preparation, NASA funds two programs:   the MASTAP and the 
PACE/MSET. 


The primary objective of MASTAP is to support institutions of higher education to increase the number and quality of 
underrepresented minority teachers well-prepared in science and mathematics.  MASTAP is designed to improve the quality of 
instruction in mathematics and science in our nation's elementary schools with significant minority enrollments.  They are also to 
support development of diverse and exemplary research in the area of mathematics, science and technology teacher training.  In FY 
1994, NASA funded three MASTAP awards to the OMU's.  In FY 1995, NASA will sustain these three awards and competitively select 
three additional awards at the OMU's.  In FY 1996, NASA will sustain three third year and three second year awards, and 
competitively select three additional awards at $200,000 each.   
 

The PACE/MSET program will be initiated in FY 1995.  The purpose of the program is to contribute to the national education goals 
by supporting research-based educational outreach projects that increase the number and strengthen the skills, knowledge and 
interest of underrepresented minority and disabled students in college preparatory mathematics, science and technology courses in 
public middle and high schools with substantial enrollments of minorities.  During FY 1995, NASA will competitively select four 
awards at the OMU's for $100,000 each and continue to fund other ongoing efforts for a total of 35 pre-college projects.  In FY 1996, 
NASA will use the PACE competitive review process to increase the number of projects at the OMU's to 45. 

 
In FY 1994, the NASA Program Offices contributed $6.4 million in support of research activities conducted at the OMU.  This 
funding is expected to increase to $8.0 million in FY 1995, and to $10.1 million in FY 1996. 
 
 
 
 



BASIS OF FY 1996 BUDGET REQUIREMENT 
 

                                                  FY 1994            FY 1995            FY 1996 
                                                              (Thousands of Dollars) 
 

Graduate student researchers program 
  (Underrepresented minority and disabled focus)    3,400              3,400              3,600 
 

PROGRAM GOALS 
 


The goal of the Graduate Student Researchers program within the Office of Equal Opportunity Program (OEOP) is to positively affect 
the number of underrepresented minorities and persons with disabilities receiving graduate degrees in NASA-related fields, 
particularly those students attending minority institutions (MIs).  The desired outcome for participants include employment with 
NASA or aerospace industries, as science and engineering faculty researchers, mathematics and science pre-college teachers or 
entrepreneurs. 

 
STRATEGY FOR ACHIEVING GOALS 

 
The Graduate Student Researchers program (Underrepresented Minority and Disabled Focus) (GSRP/UMDF) was initiated to 
respond to direction from Congress in the House and Senate Reports accompanying the FY 1985 VA-HUD-Independent Agencies 
Appropriation Act (P.L. 98-371) to "...look at those institutions of higher learning having significant minority enrollments in an effort 
to find ways to build closer relations with such schools, meet NASA's research objectives, and increase the number of individuals 
from underrepresented groups in the pool of graduate researchers."  In the House Committee Report (103-555) accompanying the FY 
1995 VA-HUD-Independent Agencies Appropriations Act (P.L. 103-327), language is included encouraging NASA to "...develop and 
increase Ph.D. graduate fellowship programs at HBCUs and HSIs offering Ph.D.s in NASA-related discipline areas; and increase 
scholarship and graduate fellowship activities for underrepresented minority students and individuals with disabilities."   
 

The OEOP supports graduate students through several programs.  The largest of these is the GSRP (UMDF), which began in 1987.  
The OEOP works in close collaboration with the NASA Installations and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to select Masters and 
Ph.D. candidates for the program.  Evaluations are based on the applicants' research proposals and/or plans of study.  The 
Installations and the JPL assign technical monitors and collaborate with the student and his/her advisor on research related to 
NASA's mission.  NASA requires active participation from the institutions, which provide student support services, faculty mentors, 
guidance on research, tuition support, and administrative support.  NASA also works in conjunction with two other national 
programs to support graduate students.  One, the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Helen T. Carr Fellowship 
program, provides fellowships for African-Americans pursuing Ph.D.s in engineering.  Upon completion of the doctoral requirements, 
a fellow is committed to teach at one of the HBCU's engineering schools.  Another program, the National Physical Science 
Consortium (NPSC) Fellowship, provides up to six years of support to underrepresented minorities pursuing Ph.D.s in the physical 
sciences.  Currently, the majority of students in these programs attend major research institutions.  The OEOP, working with the 
Installations and the JPL, will expand recruitment activities for all of its graduate programs to include juniors and seniors at 
minority institutions to encourage their consideration and preparation for graduate-level programs.  As a result of these efforts, the 
OEOP will increase the selection of students at minority institutions to a minimum of ten per year, thereby increasing support to 
minority institutions through participation in graduate programs. 

 
MEASURES OF PERFORMANCE 
 

Progress towards achieving the OEOP GSRP goals is monitored through assessing the numbers of U.S. citizen, underrepresented 
minority graduate students involved in NASA-related research and studies through the graduate program.  While the total numbers 
of such students is projected to remain roughly constant from FY 1994 through FY 1996, funding will shift towards a greater 
emphasis on supporting students at minority universities, as shown below: 
 

                                            Hispanic Serving              Other 
                        HBCU                 Institutions              Universities 
 

FY 1994                  0                        20                        146 
 

FY 1995                 15                        30                        109 
 

FY 1996                 33                        35                         95 
 

Ultimate program success is measured by the number of students completing graduate degrees and entering employment in 
scientific and technological fields.  This data is being collected, but is not yet available. 
 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PLANS 
 

In FY 1994, the eighth year of the program, an additional 49 underrepresented minority students were selected for a total of 147 
participants in the GSRP (UMDF).  This total included 41 black males, 24 black females, 47 Hispanic males, 16 Hispanic females, 4 
American Indian males, 3 American Indian females, 5 Pacific Islander males, 3 Pacific Islander females, and 4 non-minority disabled 
males.  In addition, 9 students were supported through the ASEE Helen T. Carr Fellowship program and 10 through the NPSC 
Fellowship.  In both FY 1995 and FY 1996, 50 new students will be selected to receive support through these programs. 
 

In FY 1994, $462,000 (14%) of the total funding granted to institutions under this program was granted to minority institutions.  
During FY 1995, the program will focus more heavily on minority institutions, with plans to award them $1.0 million (29%) of the 
total funding granted.  The plan for FY 1996 is to award $1.5 million (42%) of the $3.6 million budgeted for this program to minority 
institutions. 

 
In FY 1995, a panel of outside experts was convened to evaluate this program and recommend changes.  Based on their final report, 
NASA anticipates significant restructuring of the program, beginning in FY 1996.  Projected changes include increasing recruitment 
of Masters level candidates, aggressively identifying and working with minority institutions offering graduate degrees in NASA-
related disciplines, and limiting the number of institutions allowed to participate in the program.  Beginning in FY 1995, at least five 
students attending the HBCUs and five attending the HSIs will be selected into the program each year.  

 


BASIS OF FY 1996 BUDGET REQUIREMENT 
 

                                                      FY 1994            FY 1995            FY 1996 
                                                                (Thousands of Dollars) 
 

Undergraduate student researchers program 
  Underrepresented minority and disabled focus)         3,100             3,100               3,200 
 

PROGRAM GOALS 
 

The goal of the Office of Equal Opportunity's undergraduate program is to increase the presence of underrepresented minority and 
disabled students in fields of science, mathematics, engineering, and computer science compatible with NASA's mission.  The 
desired outcomes for participants include entry into graduate programs; employment with NASA or aerospace industries, as science 
and engineering faculty researchers, or as mathematics and science pre-college teachers. 
 

STRATEGY FOR ACHIEVING GOALS 
 

NASA's undergraduate program is designed to address one of the President's national education goals:  to increase the number of 
minority students receiving undergraduate and graduate degrees in mathematics and science.  This program, started in FY 1991, 
identifies high school senior and continuing first year underrepresented minority students majoring in science, engineering, 
mathematics or computer science and awards them scholarships through universities with proven records of recruiting, retaining 
and graduating underrepresented minorities and persons with disabilities in fields of science, engineering, mathematics and 
computer science. This program continues to select approximately 75 new students each year.  The students receive tuition support; 
are monitored, tutored and nurtured; and spend their summers conducting research with principal investigators at their 
universities, NASA Installations, Federal laboratories or private industry.  The NASA Installations and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
(JPL) annually review applications to the program, identify students for selection, and provide hands-on research experiences and 
mentors for those students.  NASA requires active participation from the institutions, which provide student support services, 
faculty mentors, research experiences, additional tuition support as needed, and administrative support. 



MEASURES OF PERFORMANCE 
 

Progress towards achieving the Undergraduate Student Research Program (USRP) goals is monitored through assessing the 
numbers of U.S. citizen, underrepresented minority undergraduate students involved in NASA-related research and studies through 
the USRP program.  While the total numbers of such students is projected to remain roughly constant from FY 1994 through FY 
1996, funding will shift towards a greater emphasis on supporting students at minority universities, as shown below: 
 

                                   Hispanic Serving        Native American/               Other 
                       HBCU	    Institutions         Disabilities Serving         Universities 
 

FY 1994                 54              54                       13                       127 
 

FY 1995                 66	        66                       14                       108 
 

FY 1996                 78	        78                       16                        84 
 

Ultimate program success is measured by the retention rate, number of students entering graduate programs, and number of 
students employed in scientific and technological fields.  The retention rates since program inception in FY 1991 have been 84.6%, 
82.5%, and 91.67% for the cohorts beginning in FY 1991, FY 1992, and FY 1993, respectively.  Data on graduation and career plans 
will be collected in FY 1995 as the first cohort graduates from college. 
 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PLANS 
 

In FY 1994, the fourth year of the program, an additional 56 underrepresented minority students were selected for a total of 247 
participating in the program.  This total included 124 African-Americans, 103 Hispanics, 9 Native Americans, 3 Pacific Islanders, 
and 8 students with disabilities.  FY 1995 will see the first class of graduates; the projected graduation rate for the program is 83%, 
based on the retention rate of the initial class of students.  The pipeline of undergraduate minority students majoring in the 
physical and life sciences and engineering coming from this program is expected to substantially and positively impact NASA's and 
the aerospace industry's hiring needs.  Even more important, these students are being targeted for graduate level studies and 
research careers in the fields of science and engineering.  The USRP (UMDF) will serve as a feeder to the GSRP (UMDF), in particular 
considering the relationships the students develop with the NASA Installations and the JPL as a result of participating in the USRP. 
 

In FY 1994, $1.4 million (45%) of the $3.1 million awarded under this program was given to minority institutions (MIs).  During FY 
1995, the program will focus more heavily on minority institutions, with plans to award them $1.7 million (55%) of the $3.1 million 
granted.  The plan for FY 1996 is to award $2.0 million (63%) of the $3.2 million budgeted for the program to MIs. 
 

The graduating class each year will be replaced by new selections (approximately 75 per year), thereby keeping the number of 
participants fairly constant over the next several years. 


	



SAT 7.2